Work Zone Mobility and Safety Program
Photo collage: temporary lane closure, road marking installation, cone with mounted warning light, and drum separated work zones.
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Facts and Statistics – Charts and Graphics

Work Zone Activity

Stacked bar chart comparing federal construction funding by activity type from 2012 through 2014.  All figures in dollars. In 2012 federal funding was 18.41 billion, including: 3.1 billion restoration and rehabilitation, 183 million relocation, 1.7 billion new route, 4.8 billion resurfacing, and 8.6 billion reconstruction. In 2013 federal funding was 19.1 billion, including: 3.2 billion restoration and rehabilitation, 190 million relocation, 1.7 billion new route, 4.8 billion resurfacing, and 9.1 billion reconstruction. In 2014 federal funding was 19.1 billion, including: 3.1 billion restoration and rehabilitation, 183 million relocation, 1.7 billion new route, 4.8 billion resurfacing, and 8.6 billion reconstruction
Source: Highway Statistics 2014, U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration

Bar chart showing state highway agency capital outlay and maintenance costs by year from 2012 through 2014.  All figures in dollars. For 2012: Maintenance was 76 billion and Capital outlay was 15.2 billion. For 2013: Maintenance was 76.4 billion and Capital outlay was 14.6 billion. For 2014: Maintenance was 80.8 billion and Capital outlay was 16.3 billion
Source: Highway Statistics 2014, U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration

Work Zone Fatalities

Line chart showing work zone fatalities by year from 2007 through 2014. Year is followed by number of fatalities resulting from crashes occurring in work zones that year: 2007 831, 2008 716, 2009 680, 2010 586, 2011 590, 2012 617, 2013 593, and 2014 669.
Source: National Work Zone Safety Information Clearinghouse Work Zone Fatalities

TLine chart showing work zone fatalities as a percentage of total highway fatalities by year from 2007 through 2014.  
Year is followed by percentage for that year: 2007 2.0 percent, 2008 1.9 percent, 2009 2.0 percent, 2010 1.8 percent, 2011 1.8 percent, 2012 1.8 percent, 2013 1.8 percent, and 2014 2.0 percent.
Source: National Work Zone Safety Information Clearinghouse Work Zone Fatalities

Line chart comparing large truck fatalities in work zones to all highway large truck fatalities by year from 2008 through 2014.
Year is followed by percentage of large truck involvement in all highway fatal crashes, followed by percentage of large truck involvement in work zone fatal crashes: 2008 10.7 25.7, 2009,9.4,22.2, 2010,10.6,22.7, 2011,11.0,28.3, 2012,11.0,23.1, 2013,11.3,23.6, and 2014,11.5,28.2
Source: Large Truck Related Work Zone Crashes

Table listing Persons Killed in Work Zones, by Roadway Function Class and Person Type.  Listed by Driver type followed by the number of fatalities occurring on each functional class in the following order; Interstate, Freeway/Expressway, Other Principal Arterial, Minor Arterial, Collector, Local Road or Street, Unknown, and Total for that driver type. Driver fatalities including motorcycle riders: 164,23, 109,69,37,21,4,427, Passenger fatalities including motorcycle passengers: 61,2,27,17,8,6,0,121, Pedestrian: 35,6,35,14,5,13,1,109, Pedalcyclist: 0,1,2,3,0,1,0,7, Other Nonoccupant: 0,1,2,1,0,1,0,5 and Total among all person types: 260,33,175,104,50,42,5,669.
Source: Traffic Safety Facts 2014 (PDF 3.5MB)

This chart shows a comparison of work zone fatalities among all states per $1 billion of construction spending, using 2004 data. Montana ranks the highest with approximately 30 fatalities per $1 billion of construction spending, and Washington, D.C. ranks the lowest with less than 5 fatalities per $1 billion of construction spending.
Source: Dave Holstein, Ohio Department of Transportation

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