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21st Century Operations Using 21st Century Technologies

Leveraging the Promise of Connected and Autonomous Vehicles to Improve Integrated Corridor Management and Operations: A Primer

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United States Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration

U.S. Department of Transportation
Federal Highway Administration
Office of Operations
1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
Washington, DC 20590

FHWA HOP-17-001

January 2017


[ Notice and Quality Assurance Statement ] [ Technical Report Documentation Page ] ]

Table of Contents

Introduction
Background
The Integrated Corridor Management Research Initative
Connected and Automated Vehicles
Connected Vehicle Deployment Status
Incorporating Connected and Autonomous Vehicles into the Integrated Corridor Management Approach
The Relationship between Connected and Autonomous Vehicles and Integrated Corridor Management
Best Practices for Including Connected and Autonomous Vehicles Stakeholders into the Integrated Corridor Management Approach
Building Interest
Aligning Resources
The Two-Way Benefits of Incorporating Connected and Autonomous Vehicles into Integrated Corridor Management
Opportunities and Challenges to Integration
Institutional Integration
Opportunities for Institutional Integration
Challenges to Institutional Integration
Operational Integration
Opportunities for Operational Integration
Challenges to Operational Integration
Technical Integration
Opportunities for Technical Integration
Challenges to Technical Integration
Summary and Conclusions
Getting Ready for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles
The Benefits of Incorporating Connected and Autonomous Vehicles into Integrated Corridor Management

List of Figures

Figure 1. Illustration. Connected vehicles can help to prevent crashes at busy intersections
Figure 2. Illustration. Platooning uses cooperative adaptive cruise control to improve traffic flow stability
Figure 3. Illustration. Automated vehicles use a variety of technologies to help perform safety-critical driving functions
Figure 4. Illustration. Dynamic Ridesharing (D-RIDE) communication flow
Figure 5. Illustration. Information ow for a road weather information system

List of Tables

Table 1. Connected vehicle deployment driven by the regulatory and government efforts
Table 2. Definition of champions and stakeholders
Table 3. Bringing together integrated corridor management and connected and autonomous vehicle stakeholders
Table 4. Relevant impact assessment results
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