Integrating Operations into Planning and Programming

Analysis and Performance Measurement

Regional Collaboration and Coordination

Organizing for Operations

Congestion Management Process (CMP)

Regional Concept for Transportation Operations (RCTO)

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Selected Planning for Operations Excerpts from Title 23, United States Code, Reflecting MAP-21 Amendments

Bold has been added to highlight portions specific to planning for operations. Although relevant to planning for operations, these excerpts do not highlight the performance-based planning aspects of the U.S.C. For information on MAP-21 and performance-based planning, see the FHWA MAP-21 website.

Transportation Systems Management and Operations

MAP-21 provides an updated definition of transportation systems management and operations (TSMO), also referred to as "management and operations" or "M&O."

Title 23 U.S.C. Sec. 101. Definitions and declaration of policy

(30) Transportation systems management and operations. -

(A) In general. - The term "transportation systems management and operations" means integrated strategies to optimize the performance of existing infrastructure through the implementation of multimodal and intermodal, cross- jurisdictional systems, services, and projects designed to preserve capacity and improve security, safety, and reliability of the transportation system.

(B) Inclusions. - The term "transportation systems management and operations" includes -

(i) actions such as traffic detection and surveillance, corridor management, freeway management, arterial management, active transportation and demand management, work zone management, emergency management, traveler information services, congestion pricing, parking management, automated enforcement, traffic control, commercial vehicle operations, freight management, and coordination of highway, rail, transit, bicycle, and pedestrian operations; and

(ii) coordination of the implementation of regional transportation system management and operations investments (such as traffic incident management, traveler information services, emergency management, roadway weather management, intelligent transportation systems, communication networks, and information sharing systems) requiring agreements, integration, and interoperability to achieve targeted system performance, reliability, safety, and customer service levels.

 

Management and Operations in Metropolitan Transportation Planning

Title 23 U.S.C. Sec. 134. Metropolitan transportation planning

 

(c) General Requirements. -

(1) Development of long-range plans and tips. - To accomplish the objectives in subsection (a), metropolitan planning organizations designated under subsection (d), in cooperation with the State and public transportation operators, shall develop long-range transportation plans and transportation improvement programs through a performance-driven, outcome-based approach to planning for metropolitan areas of the State.

(2) Contents. - The plans and TIPs for each metropolitan area shall provide for the development and integrated management and operation of transportation systems and facilities (including accessible pedestrian walkways and bicycle transportation facilities) that will function as an intermodal transportation system for the metropolitan planning area and as an integral part of an intermodal transportation system for the State and the United States.

(3) Process of development. - The process for developing the plans and TIPs shall provide for consideration of all modes of transportation and shall be continuing, cooperative, and comprehensive to the degree appropriate, based on the complexity of the transportation problems to be addressed.

. . .

(h) Scope of Planning Process. -

(1) In general. - The metropolitan planning process for a metropolitan planning area under this section shall provide for consideration of projects and strategies that will -

(A) support the economic vitality of the metropolitan area, especially by enabling global competitiveness, productivity, and efficiency;

(B) increase the safety of the transportation system for motorized and nonmotorized users;

(C) increase the security of the transportation system for motorized and nonmotorized users;

(D) increase the accessibility and mobility of people and for freight;

(E) protect and enhance the environment, promote energy conservation, improve the quality of life, and promote consistency between transportation improvements and State and local planned growth and economic development patterns;

(F) enhance the integration and connectivity of the transportation system, across and between modes, for people and freight;

(G) promote efficient system management and operation; and

(H) emphasize the preservation of the existing transportation system.

. . .  

(i) Development of Transportation Plan. -

(1) Requirements. -

(A) In general. - Each metropolitan planning organization shall prepare and update a transportation plan for its metropolitan planning area in accordance with the requirements of this subsection.

(B) Frequency. –

(i) In general. - The metropolitan planning organization shall prepare and update such plan every 4 years (or more frequently, if the metropolitan planning organization elects to update more frequently) in the case of each of the following:

(I) Any area designated as nonattainment, as defined in section 107(d) of the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7407(d)).

(II) Any area that was nonattainment and subsequently designated to attainment in accordance with section 107(d)(3) of that Act (42 U.S.C. 7407(d)(3)) and that is subject to a maintenance plan under section 175A of that Act (42 U.S.C. 7505a).

(ii) Other areas. - In the case of any other area required to have a transportation plan in accordance with the requirements of this subsection, the metropolitan planning organization shall prepare and update such plan every 5 years unless the metropolitan planning organization elects to update more frequently.

(2) Transportation plan. - A transportation plan under this section shall be in a form that the Secretary determines to be appropriate and shall contain, at a minimum, the following:

(A) Identification of transportation facilities. -

(i) In general. - An identification of transportation facilities (including major roadways, transit, multimodal and intermodal facilities, nonmotorized transportation facilities, and intermodal connectors) that should function as an integrated metropolitan transportation system, giving emphasis to those facilities that serve important national and regional transportation functions.

(ii) Factors. - In formulating the transportation plan, the metropolitan planning organization shall consider factors described in subsection (h) as the factors relate to a 20- year forecast period.

(B) Performance measures and targets. - A description of the performance measures and performance targets used in assessing the performance of the transportation system in accordance with subsection (h)(2).

(C) System performance report. - A system performance report and subsequent updates evaluating the condition and performance of the transportation system with respect to the performance targets described in subsection (h)(2), including -

(i) progress achieved by the metropolitan planning organization in meeting the performance targets in comparison with system performance recorded in previous reports; and

(ii) for metropolitan planning organizations that voluntarily elect to develop multiple scenarios, an analysis of how the preferred scenario has improved the conditions and performance of the transportation system and how changes in local policies and investments have impacted the costs necessary to achieve the identified performance targets.

(D) Mitigation activities. -

(i) In general. - A long-range transportation plan shall include a discussion of types of potential environmental mitigation activities and potential areas to carry out these activities, including activities that may have the greatest potential to restore and maintain the environmental functions affected by the plan.

(ii) Consultation. - The discussion shall be developed in consultation with Federal, State, and tribal wildlife, land management, and regulatory agencies.

(E) Financial plan. -

(i) In general. - A financial plan that -

(I) demonstrates how the adopted transportation plan can be implemented;

(II) indicates resources from public and private sources that are reasonably expected to be made available to carry out the plan; and

(III) recommends any additional financing strategies for needed projects and programs.

(ii) Inclusions. - The financial plan may include, for illustrative purposes, additional projects that would be included in the adopted transportation plan if reasonable additional resources beyond those identified in the financial plan were available.

(iii) Cooperative development. - For the purpose of developing the transportation plan, the metropolitan planning organization, transit operator, and State shall cooperatively develop estimates of funds that will be available to support plan implementation.

(F) Operational and management strategies. - Operational and management strategies to improve the performance of existing transportation facilities to relieve vehicular congestion and maximize the safety and mobility of people and goods.

(G) Capital investment and other strategies. - Capital investment and other strategies to preserve the existing and projected future metropolitan transportation infrastructure and provide for multimodal capacity increases based on regional priorities and needs.

(H) Transportation and transit enhancement activities. - Proposed transportation and transit enhancement activities.

. . .  

(k) Transportation Management Areas. -

(1) Identification and designation. -

(A) Required identification. - The Secretary shall identify as a transportation management area each urbanized area (as defined by the Bureau of the Census) with a population of over 200,000 individuals.

(B) Designations on request. - The Secretary shall designate any additional area as a transportation management area on the request of the Governor and the metropolitan planning organization designated for the area.

(2) Transportation plans. - In a transportation management area, transportation plans shall be based on a continuing and comprehensive transportation planning process carried out by the metropolitan planning organization in cooperation with the State and public transportation operators.

(3) Congestion management process. -

(A) In general. - Within a metropolitan planning area serving a transportation management area, the transportation planning process under this section shall address congestion management through a process that provides for effective management and operation, based on a cooperatively developed and implemented metropolitan-wide strategy, of new and existing transportation facilities eligible for funding under this title and chapter 53 of title 49 through the use of travel demand reduction and operational management strategies.

(B) Schedule. - The Secretary shall establish an appropriate phase-in schedule for compliance with the requirements of this section but no sooner than 1 year after the identification of a transportation management area.

. . .

Management and Operations in Statewide Transportation Planning

Sec. 135. Statewide and nonmetropolitan transportation planning

(a) General Requirements. -

(1) Development of plans and programs. - Subject to section 134, to accomplish the objectives stated in section 134(a), each State shall develop a statewide transportation plan and a statewide transportation improvement program for all areas of the State.

(2) Contents. - The statewide transportation plan and the transportation improvement program developed for each State shall provide for the development and integrated management and operation of transportation systems and facilities (including accessible pedestrian walkways and bicycle transportation facilities) that will function as an intermodal transportation system for the State and an integral part of an intermodal transportation system for the United States.

. . .

(d) Scope of Planning Process. -

(1) In general. - Each State shall carry out a statewide transportation planning process that provides for consideration and implementation of projects, strategies, and services that will -

(A) support the economic vitality of the United States, the States, nonmetropolitan areas, and metropolitan areas, especially by enabling global competitiveness, productivity, and efficiency;

(B) increase the safety of the transportation system for motorized and nonmotorized users;

(C) increase the security of the transportation system for motorized and nonmotorized users;

(D) increase the accessibility and mobility of people and freight;

(E) protect and enhance the environment, promote energy conservation, improve the quality of life, and promote consistency between transportation improvements and State and local planned growth and economic development patterns;

(F) enhance the integration and connectivity of the transportation system, across and between modes throughout the State, for people and freight;

(G) promote efficient system management and operation; and

(H) emphasize the preservation of the existing transportation system.

. . .

(f) Long-range Statewide Transportation Plan. -

(1) Development. - Each State shall develop a long-range statewide transportation plan, with a minimum 20-year forecast period for all areas of the State, that provides for the development and implementation of the intermodal transportation system of the State.

. . .

(8) Existing system. - The statewide transportation plan should include capital, operations and management strategies, investments, procedures, and other measures to ensure the preservation and most efficient use of the existing transportation system.