Office of Operations Freight Management and Operations

Compilation of Existing State Truck Size and Weight Limit Laws

Appendix A: State Truck Size and Weight Laws

The scope of this report captures the current structure of existing truck size and weight limit laws from all 50 States and the District of Columbia. This report does not address the interplay of ever-changing case law and its effect on State laws. In some instances, State or Federal courts may have interpreted State law and issued rulings that are inconsistent with the statutes and laws in this report.

Common State Statute Exemptions to Standard Federal Limits

Through statute, administrative code, and enforcement policy, States have given exemptions to various types of vehicles and commodities to operate above standard Federal truck size and weight limits. These exemptions often only apply to non-Interstate highways; however, that is not always the case. Also, some exemptions or higher weights are allowed through specific permits. To summarize how prevalent exemptions are on the non-Interstate, including segments of the NHS, Exhibit 7 below shows the most common commodity and vehicle exemptions given through State statute and the number of States in which they are present (including the District of Columbia).

Exhibit 7: Common State Statute Exemptions
Vehicle Type/Commodity Number of States With Exemptions
Aggregate Products (Rock, sand, gravel, road base, etc.) 15
Agricultural/Farm Products & Commodities  41
Construction Equipment/ Highway Machinery 28
Emission Reduction Equipment10 40
Fire Trucks 29
Government-owned Vehicles 16
Implements of Husbandry 20
Snow Plows 10
Solid Waste/Rubbish/Trash 28
Timber Products & Commodities 22
Tow Trucks 22

Federal Compliance Clauses

Federal law prevents States from enforcing vehicle weight limits on Interstate highways that deviate from established Federal weight limits and specific exceptions.11 According to these provisions, "the United States Secretary of Transportation shall withhold 50 percent of appropriated funds from a State that sets weight limits for Interstate travel that are higher or lower than the standard Federal limits for Interstate highways, with some exceptions" (23 U.S.C. §127[a]).

Many State statutes include clauses that place some level of restriction on State weight limits to avoid withholding of Federal funds due to non-compliance with Federal provisions. States ensure adherence to these Federal compliance clauses in a variety of ways.12 Many States require the legislature or the State Department with jurisdiction over vehicle weight regulations to increase the limits if Federal law changes or if it is brought to their attention that they do not comply with Federal law. A few States directly tie their limits to increases or decreases in Federal weight limits, while others simply void any provision that would threaten the appropriation of Federal funds to their State.

Although most States explicitly establish two sets of weight limits, one for State highways and one for Interstate highways, others do not explicitly draw out separate limits for Interstates in statute. In at least eight such States (Connecticut, Hawaii, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, Washington, and Wyoming), the weight limits given in statute are higher than the standard Federal limits for Interstate highways,13 but a Federal compliance clause is in place that implies that the standard Federal weight limits would apply to Interstate travel to protect that State from losing any Federal funding.

The compilation of State laws that were in effect on or before the enactment of MAP-21 (October 1, 2012) follows.

Alabama Illinois Mississippi Rhode Island
Alaska Indiana Nebraska South Carolina
Arizona Iowa Nevada South Dakota
Arkansas Kansas New Hampshire Tennessee
California Kentucky New Jersey Texas
Colorado Louisiana New Mexico Utah
Connecticut Maine New York Vermont
Delaware Maryland North Carolina Virginia
District of Columbia Massachusetts North Dakota Washington
Florida Michigan Ohio West Virginia
Georgia Minnesota Oregon Wisconsin
Hawaii Missouri Pennsylvania Wyoming
Idaho Montana Oklahoma

 


Alabama

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Alabama are found in Ala. Code §§32-9-20 et seq.(available on the Alabama's Web site at http://alisondb.legislature.state.al.us/acas/ACASLoginfire.asp).

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Alabama, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. The State bridge formula allows up to 36,000 lbs. on tandem axles on non-Interstate highways, depending on axle spacing. 
  2. The State bridge formula allows 42,000 lbs. on a tridem axle on non-Interstate highways. 
  3. The State bridge formula allows a gross weight of 84,000 lbs. on a six axle truck-semitrailer (TST) combination.
  4. State law provides for a10 percent weight tolerance for enforcement on non-Interstate highways.
  5. State law exempts vehicles transporting certain commodities from State weight limits.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State's bridge formula (Computed Gross Weight Table in Ala. Code §32-9-20[a][4][c]). State law allows a 10 percent tolerance for weight enforcement (Ala. Code §32-9-20[a][4][d]). See Exhibit 8 for a summary of Alabama weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 8: Summary of Alabama Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs. on Interstate highways 36,000 lbs. on non-Interstate highways
Tridem Axle 42,000 lbs.
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs. on Interstate highways 84,000 lbs. (6 or more axles) on non-Interstate highways
Other 10 percent scale or enforcement tolerance on non-Interstate highways

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Agricultural Commodities: Two- and three-axle vehicles being used exclusively for the purpose of transporting agricultural commodities or products to and from a farm and for agricultural purposes relating to the operation and maintenance of a farm by any farmer, custom harvester, or husbandman may not be made to conform to the State axle and gross vehicle weight limits (Ala. Code §32-9-20[a][4][j]). 

Cotton: Trucks, semitrailer trucks, or trailers used exclusively for carrying 50 bales or less of cotton are generally exempt from State size and weight limits (Ala. Code §32-9-22[a]).

Implements of Husbandry: Implements of husbandry are generally exempt from State size and weight limits (Ala. Code §32-9-22[a]).

Milk for Human Consumption: Any truck or semitrailer truck transporting milk for human consumption where refrigeration and transit is reasonably necessary in the interest of public health, when moving under refrigeration to or from market and the area where the milk is collected or concentrated, is exempt from State size and weight provisions (Ala. Code §32-9-23).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for auxiliary power units or idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12).  The exemption, which applies to axle weight, gross vehicle weight, or bridge formula weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (Ala. Code §32-9-20[b]).

Other Exemptions

Vehicles Constructed for Special Types of Work: Dump trucks, dump trailers, concrete mixing trucks, fuel oil trucks, gasoline trucks, and trucks designated and constructed for special types work or use do not need to conform with the axle spacing requirements specified by the State bridge formula.  These vehicles are limited to a weight of 20,000 lbs. per axle plus scale tolerances, provided that the maximum gross weight does not exceed State limits and all axles are brake equipped (Ala. Code §32-9-20[a][4][e]).

Government-Owned Vehicles: Trucks, semitrailer trucks, or trailers owned by Federal, State, or local governments are generally exempt from State size and weight limits (Ala. Code. §32-9-22[a]). 

Local Licenses and Limits: Vehicles licensed by a city or an incorporated town are exempt from State size and weight limits, provided that they are operating within the limits of the municipality or police jurisdiction, that the municipality has adopted ordinances governing the size and weight of vehicles within their police jurisdiction, and that the municipal limits are not less than State limits (Ala. Code §32-9-22[b]). 

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Director of the Alabama Department of Transportation or a designee may issue both annual and single-trip permits for oversized vehicles or vehicle combinations, provided that the permits are issued for loads that are non-divisible.  Annual permits can authorize overweight vehicles up to 150,000 lbs. GVW with up to 22,000 lbs. on a single axle.  Vehicles over 100,000 lbs. require advance routing by the Department of Transportation (Ala. Code §32-9-29[a]).  The Director may also issue annual permits for vehicles transporting rubber-tired equipment used for mining refractory grade bauxite authorizing single axle weights up to 27,000 lbs. (Ala. Code §32-9-29[b][1][b]).  Farm and agriculture commodities and equipment are exempt from the requirement of obtaining permits for movement on the State highway system (Ala. Code §32-9-29[f]).

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Alabama State statute.

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Alaska

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Alaska are found in Alaska Administrative Code (Alaska Admin. Code tit. 17, §§25.010 et seq., available on the State's Web site at http://www.legis.state.ak.us/basis/folioproxy.asp?url=http://wwwjnu01.legis.state.ak.us/cgi-bin/folioisa.dll/aac/query=*/doc/{t73571}) per Alaska Stat. §19.10.060.

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways14

Alaska has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) that allows vehicles to operate above 80,000 lbs. on parts of federally funded AK-1, AK-2, and AK-3.  See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Alaska, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. The 38,000 lb. tandem axle limit and 42,000 lb. tridem axle limit exceed the FBF for axle spacing less than 8 feet. 
  2. Alaska does not impose a cap on the gross vehicle weight limit. Gross weight is governed by axle group limits, the FBF, and allowable vehicle configurations. 
  3. During winter months, shifting extra weight (up to 2,000 lbs.) to drive axles within axle groups is allowed, and an overall weight limit tolerance (up to 1,500 lbs.) for ice buildup is provided. State law provides for a 1,000-lb. enforcement tolerance.

Regular Operations

Alaska is unique in that it does not have a stated gross vehicle weight limit.  The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the FBF and State axle group limits, whichever is less.  Because Alaska limits the length of cargo-carrying trailers or semitrailers to a length of 53 feet, the practical limit for a five-axle TST is a GVW of 80,000 lbs. See Exhibit 9 for a summary of Alaska's weight provisions under regular operations (Alaska Admin. Code, tit. 17, §25.013).

Exhibit 9: Summary of Alaska Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 38,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle 42,000 lbs.
Gross Weight

No defined upper limit.  Gross vehicle weight is limited by the FBF or the summation of axle or axle group limits – whichever is less.  Weight limits on axles or axle groups may not exceed the following, and the distance between axles may not be less than the following:

Single Axle: weight (lbs.) - 20,000; distance: 8'1" Minimum spacing*

2-Axle Group: weight (lbs.) - 38,000; distance: 3'6" Minimum spacing

3-Axle Group: weight (lbs.) - 42,000; distance: 3'6" Minimum spacing**

4-Axle Group: weight (lbs.) - 50,000; distance: 3'6" Minimum spacing

Other n/a
* Any axle spaced less than 8 feet and 1 inch from any other axle, measured between the centers of the nearest axles, is considered as part of an axle group.
** When the semitrailer length in a TST combination is 48 feet or more, the maximum weight on a three-axle group where the minimum axle spacing is 5 feet is 43,500 lbs. Where the minimum spacing is 6 feet, the maximum weight is 45,000 lbs.

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

None.

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for auxiliary power units or idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight, gross vehicle weight, or bridge formula weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (Alaska Admin. Code tit. 17, §25.013[g]).

Other Exemptions

Implements of Husbandry: Implements of husbandry are not subject to vehicle weight restrictions unless the implement is the load of another vehicle. These vehicles may be operated on highways subject to the jurisdiction of the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities without obtaining a permit, subject to the provisions of Alaska Stat. §19.10.065.

Traction Weight Shifting in Axle Groups: Between October 1 and March 31, legal axle weights are allowed to be shifted for one, two, and three drive axle groupings on power vehicles traveling on the Steese, Elliott, Dalton, and Richardson highways between North Pole and Prudhoe Bay, or between North Pole and MP 30 of the Steese Highway. The shifted weight on these drive axle groupings may not exceed 2,000 lbs. per axle. The legal allowable gross weight on a vehicle or combination of vehicles may not exceed the maximum weight. Reasonable access for food, fuel, or rest up to 5 miles is also granted, subject to local ordinances (Alaska Admin. Code tit. 17, §25.013[d]).

Snow and Ice Tolerance: Alaska allows a tolerance of 1,500 lbs. for gross and axle weight limits for snow and ice buildup between October 1 and April 30 of each year (Alaska Admin. Code tit. 17, §25.335[b][3]).

Enforcement Tolerance: Weight violations up to 1,000 lbs. over limits will be issued a citation and allowed to proceed. Violations over 1,000 lbs. will be issued a citation and directed to a location to unload excess weight from the vehicle (Alaska Admin. Code tit. 17, §25.335[b][1]-[2]).

Government-Owned Vehicles: A vehicle that is owned by the State and operated by an employee of the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities is not subject to State weight limits (Alaska Admin. Code tit. 17, §25.011).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities is authorized to issue permits for the transportation of non-divisible loads that exceed State weight limits by up to 25 percent (Alaska Admin. Code tit. 17, §25.320).

As necessary, each permit will establish time limitations, designated routes, a limit on the number of trips, or other restrictions. The movement of permitted oversize or overweight vehicles or loads must also comply with requirements and safety considerations specified in the department's Administrative Permit Manual.

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: Grandfathered routes in Alaska include AK-1 from Anchorage to Palmer, AK-2 from Fairbanks to Delta Junction, and AK-3 from the Junction with AK-1 to Fairbanks (Alaska Admin. Code tit. 17, §25.014).

Traction Weight Shifting: The exemption for traction weight shifting in axle groups applies to these routes only: Steese, Elliott, Dalton, and Richardson highways between North Pole and Prudhoe Bay, or between North Pole and MP 30 of the Steese Highway.

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Arizona

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Arizona are found in Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. §§28-1100 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://www.azleg.gov/ArizonaRevisedStatutes.asp?Title=28). State regulations related to overweight permits are in Ariz. Admin. Code §§R17-6-101 et seq.

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Arizona has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 129,000 lbs. GVW on parts of the Interstate system.15 See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Arizona, a provision in State law allows trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits: Excess weight up to 1,000 lbs. over State limits, which are consistent with Federal limits, is penalized by a fine of 1 dollar.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State's bridge formula (adopted FBF). The State's adopted bridge formula allows for 80,000 lbs. maximum on a 5-axle vehicle, provided that the vehicle complies with the FBF. See Exhibit 10 for a summary of Arizona's weight provisions under regular operations (Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. §28-1100).

Exhibit 10: Summary of Arizona Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle Per State weight table
Gross Weight Per State weight table
80,000 lbs. (5-axle or more)
Other n/a

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

None.

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for auxiliary power units or idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S. Code §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight, gross vehicle weight, or bridge formula weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. §28-1100[h]).

Other Exemptions

Vehicles Constructed for Special Types of Work: State size, weight, and load provisions do not apply to fire trucks, urban public transportation system vehicles, or implements of husbandry (including farm tractors) that are temporarily moved on a highway (Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. §28-1091). In addition, trucks for which a special permit has been issued pursuant to Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. §28-1103 and that meet the following requirements are exempt from the provisions in §28-1100:

  • Are equipped with a conveyor bed;
  • Are used solely as a fiber and forage module mover;
  • Do not exceed 48 feet in length; and
  • Are only operated each year from August 1 through January 30, unless the Director extends the period of use. (Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. §28.1100[g])

Tow Trucks: The total weight of a tow truck is also exempt from the allowable maximum total gross weight load when it is towing a damaged, disabled, or abandoned vehicle or vehicle combination (Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. §28-1108[f]).

Enforcement Tolerance: Weight violations up to 1,000 lbs. receive a fine of 1 dollar (Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. §28-1101[1][b]).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Director of the State Department of Transportation is authorized to issue permits for the operation of vehicles that exceed State weight limits. The Director is required to adopt rules for over dimensional and overweight loads; these rules can be found in Ariz. Admin. Code §§17-6-101 et seq. State statute allows a special permit to be valid for 1 year, unless limited by the Director, under one of these conditions:

  • The vehicle is a vehicle or vehicle combination with weight not exceeding 111,000 lbs. and traveling within 20 miles of the borders of Arizona and an adjacent State that allows the same gross vehicle weight.
  • The vehicle is a vehicle or vehicle combination with weight not exceeding 123,000 lbs. and traveling within 4 miles of the borders of Arizona and an adjacent State allowing certain vehicle combinations, or traveling on a route extending at least 10 miles through an Indian reservation and within 20 miles of the border of Arizona and an adjacent State allowing certain vehicle combinations. This provision does not apply to NN truck routes.

State axle weight limitations apply in both instances (Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. §28-1103).

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Arizona State statute.

Grandfathered Routes: Following are considered grandfathered routes in or through Arizona: I-15 from Nevada to Utah; U.S.-89 from 20 miles south of Utah to the Utah border; U.S.-160 from U.S.-163 to New Mexico; U.S.-163 from U.S.-160 to Utah.

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Arkansas

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Arkansas are found in Ark. Stat. Ann. §§27-35-101 et seq. (available via LexisNexis at http://www.lexisnexis.com/hottopics/arcode/). Provisions related specifically to weight limits begin at Ark. Stat. Ann. §27-35-203.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Arkansas, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits.

  1. Arkansas allows 50,000 lbs. on a tridem axle.
  2. Several variances are allowed for specific industries, including transportation of cotton, animal feed, solid waste, aggregate products, farm products, and forest products.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the FBF. See Exhibit 11 for a summary of Arkansas' weight provisions under regular operations (Ark. Stat. Ann. §27-35-203).
Exhibit 11: Summary of Arkansas Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle 50,000*
Gross Weight Per State weight table
80,000 lbs.
Other Steering axle 20,000 lbs.**
Tandem-steer axle 24,000 lbs
* Provided that, within a tri-axle group, no single axle exceeds 18,000 lbs. and no tandem axle group exceeds 32,000 lbs. This number is derived by adding the weight limit for a tandem to the weight limit for a single axle, as specified in Ark. Stat. Ann. §27-35-203(e)(1), consistent with the definition of a tridem given in Ark. Admin. Code §001.01.3-IV.
**12,000–20,000 lbs., depending on the manufacturer's steering axle weight rating §27-35-203[c][1].

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Cotton: Vehicles that have a total outside width between 102 and 108 inches and are used for hauling compacted seed cotton from the farm to the first point of processing are allowed an 8,000 lb. per axle variance above the maximum allowable gross axle weight for single and tandem axles, except on Federal Interstate highways. However, the maximum gross weight, including any allowable variance or tolerance, may not exceed 80,000 lbs. (Ark. Stat. Ann. §27-35-203[g][1][a]).

Animal Feed: Vehicles with five axles used exclusively by an owner of livestock or poultry for hauling animal feed to the owner's farm/home for consumption are allowed an 8 percent variance above the allowable gross weight under the FBF and a tandem axle load of up to 36,500 lbs. However, the maximum gross weight, including any allowable variance or tolerance, may not exceed 80,000 lbs., and any variance of gross or axle weight is not permitted on Federal Interstate highways (Ark. Stat. Ann. §27-35-203[g][1][b] and §27-35-203[g][2]).16

Solid Waste: Vehicles used exclusively for hauling solid waste are allowed an 8 percent variance above the allowable gross weight under the FBF and a tandem axle load of up to 36,500 lbs. However, the maximum gross weight, including any allowable variance or tolerance, may not exceed 80,000 lbs., and any variance of gross or axle weight is not permitted on Federal Interstate highways (Ark. Stat. Ann. §27-35-203[g][1][c] and §27-35-203[g][2]).

Aggregate Products: A truck tractor and single semitrailer combination with five axles hauling sand, gravel, rock, or crushed stone is exempt from the FBF on non-Interstate highways. However, they must comply with the single axle (20,000 lbs.), tandem axle (34,000 lbs.), and gross weight (80,000 lbs.) maximums (Ark. Stat. Ann. §27-35-203[i][1] – [2][a]).

Unprocessed Farm/Forest Products: Vehicles with five axles hauling unfinished and unprocessed farm products, forest product, or other products of the soil are exempt from the FBF on non-Interstate highways. However, they must comply with a single axle limit of 20,000 lbs., a tandem axle limit of 36,500 lbs., and a gross weight limit of 85,000 lbs. (Ark. Stat. Ann. §27-35-203[i][1] – [2][b]).

Other Exemptions

Vehicles Constructed for Special Types of Work: State size, weight, and load limits do not apply to fire trucks, road machinery, or implements of husbandry (including farm tractors) temporarily moved upon a highway (Ark. Stat. Ann. §27-35-102).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

None.

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The State Highway Commission is authorized to issue special permits for cargoes that cannot readily be taken apart, separated, dismembered, or otherwise reduced in size or weight. These permits authorize the applicant to exceed the maximum weight specified in statute on any highway under the commission's jurisdiction. The commission may also delegate the authority to issue special permits to other State agencies (Ark. Stat. Ann. §27-35-210[a][1]).

Special Permits: The commission has the power to issue special permits (to divisible loads) in the following situations:17

  • Vehicles transporting cross ties from their point of processing to a location where they will undergo creosote processing, and traveling less than 100 miles one-way, can receive a special permit. Permits may allow a tandem axle on a 5-axle vehicle to carry a load of 36,500 lbs. No portion of such a trip may be on any part of the Federal Interstate highways (Ark. Stat. Ann. §27-35-210[k][1]).
  • Vehicles with at least five load-bearing axles carrying sealed containerized cargo units, as part of international trade, may be permitted to have a gross vehicle weight of 90,000 lbs. but may not exceed 20,000 lbs. per axle (Ark. Stat. Ann. §27-35-210[l][1]).
  • Wreckers or tow vehicles may obtain a single-trip or annual permit to operate in excess of maximum size and weight limitations while moving a disabled or wrecked vehicle (Ark. Stat. Ann. §27-35-210[m]).

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Arkansas State statute.

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California

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of California are found in Cal. Vehicle Code §§35001 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/codes.xhtml). The provisions governing truck weight are in Cal. Vehicle Code §§35550 et seq. and permitting provisions are in Cal. Vehicle Code §§35780 et seq.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in California, two provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. Log trucks are allowed to exceed the Federal limit for tandem axles of 34,000 lbs. by 1,500 lbs.
  2. Between September 15 and March 15 each year, cotton trucks that meet certain criteria are allowed an additional 6,000 lbs. above the Federal limit of 34,000 lbs. for tandem axles.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by two separate sections of State law, the "computation of allowable gross weight" and the "alternative method of computation," for combinations of vehicles containing trailers or semitrailers18 (Cal. Vehicle Code §35551 and §35551.5). See Exhibit 12 for a summary of California's weight provisions under regular operations (Cal. Vehicle Code §35550 through §35551.5).

Exhibit 12: Summary of California Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Alternative method of computation: 18,000 lbs.
Alternative method of computation, limit on steering axle: 12,500 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Alternative method of computation: 33,600 lbs.
Tridem Axle Not defined in statute but subject to provisions
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Alternative method of computation: 76,800 lbs.
Other n/a

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Logs: Trucks and vehicle combinations transporting loads composed solely of logs are allowed to exceed the tandem axle limit by up to 1,500 lbs. for a maximum tandem axle gross weight of 35,500 lbs. Two consecutive sets of tandem axles are allowed a combined gross weight of up to 69,000 lbs. provided no axle exceeds 35,500 lbs. and the overall distance between the first and last axle of such consecutive sets of tandem axles is 34 feet or more (Cal. Vehicle Code §35552). State axle weight limits do not apply to the transportation of a single saw log of up to 8 feet in diameter and 21 feet in length, or up to 6 feet in diameter and 33 feet in length, if the log is hauled on a combination consisting of a three-axle truck and a two-axle logging dolly that is operating under a relevant permit (Cal. Vehicle Code §35785).

Cotton: Between September 15 and March 15 each year, State weight limits do not apply to cotton module movers or any truck tractor pulling a semitrailer that is a cotton module mover. These vehicles may exceed the tandem axle limit (34,000 lbs.) by 6,000 lbs. The vehicle must be operated laterally across a State highway at grade of the State highway or upon a county highway within specified counties, unless prohibited or limited by resolution of the county board of supervisors having jurisdiction (Cal. Vehicle Code §35555). This exemption does not, however, apply to routes on the NN.

Livestock: The gross weight limit provided for weight bearing upon any one wheel, or wheels, supporting one end of an axle does not apply to vehicles that are carrying loads of livestock (Cal. Vehicle Code §35550[b]). Under the alternative method of computation, trucks transporting livestock are among the types of vehicles that are exempt from that section's front axle weight limits (Cal. Vehicle Code §35551.5[b]).

Bulk Grains or Bulk Livestock Feed: Under the alternative method of computation, trucks transporting bulk grains or bulk livestock feed are among the types of vehicles that are exempt from that section's front axle weight limits (Cal. Vehicle Code §35551.5[b]).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

None.19

Other Exemptions

Snow Plows: California size, weight, and load provisions, except those requiring a permit for overweight loads, do not apply to motor trucks equipped with snow removal devices (Cal. Vehicle Code §35001).

Emergency Vehicles: Authorized emergency vehicles that were purchased before 1994 and are owned or operated by a governmental agency are not subject to California size, weight, and load provisions (Cal. Vehicle Code §35002). Fire trucks are also exempt from weight limits (Cal. Public Works Division §21-2-7-1411.7).

Vehicles Constructed for Special Types of Work: Under the alternative method of computation, several types of vehicle are exempt from that section's front axle weight limits, including trucks transporting vehicles; dump trucks or trucks transporting refuse; cranes; buses; transit mix concrete or cement trucks; electricity, gas, water, or telephone service public utility vehicles; and tank trucks that have a cargo capacity of at least 1,500 gallons (Cal. Vehicle Code §35551.5[b]).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The California Department of Transportation is authorized to issue permits for the operation of vehicles that exceed State weight limits by up to 25 percent. Excess weight loads cannot be transported on highways for distances exceeding 75 miles. Permits may be issued for a single trip or for continuous operation, and the permitting authority may limit the number of trips, establish seasonal or other time limitations, or otherwise restrict vehicle operation. Permits allowing loads in excess of State weight limits do not apply to routes on the National System of Interstate and Defense Highways (Cal. Vehicle Code §35780, §35788, and §36782).

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in California State statute.

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Colorado

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Colorado are found in Colo. Rev. Stat. §§42-4-501 et seq. (available via LexisNexis at http://www.lexisnexis.com/hottopics/colorado/). Additional provisions are in State regulations related to vehicle weight requirements (8 Colo. Admin. Code §1507-28:IV) and overweight permits (2 Colo. Admin Code §§601–4:1 et seq.).

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Colorado has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 110,000 lbs. GVW and 36,000 lbs. on a tandem axle on parts of the Interstate system. See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Colorado, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. Colorado weight limits for tandem axles—40,000 lbs. on non-Interstate highways—exceed the Federal limit of 34,000 lbs.
  2. Colorado allows a gross vehicle weight of up to 85,000 lbs. on non-Interstate highways.
  3. Alternative fuel vehicles are allowed an additional 1,000 lbs. of gross vehicle weight on non-Interstate highways.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by Colo. Rev. Stat. §42-4-507 and §42-4-508. Generally, Colorado allows higher loads on non-Interstate routes; Colorado also uses both the FBF and its own State bridge formula for gross vehicle weight. See Exhibit 13 for a summary of Colorado's weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 13: Summary of Colorado Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 36,000 lbs. on Interstates
40,000 lbs. on non-Interstate highways
Tridem Axle Per FBF
Gross Weight Interstates: 80,000 lbs. and FBF*
Non-Interstate highways: 85,000 lbs. and State bridge formula**
Other 500 lbs. per inch of tire width
* Except grandfathered routes, which allow up to 110,000 lbs. on some Interstates
** The State bridge formula is W = 1000 *(40+L) (Colo. Rev. Stat. §42-4-508[1][b]).

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

None.

Emission Reduction / Special Fuel Exemptions

Alternative Fuels: Vehicles that use alternative fuels, or both alternative and conventional fuels, are allowed an additional 1,000 lbs. in gross weight when operated on non-Interstate highways (Colo. Rev. Stat. §42-4-508[1.5]). Alternative fuels are defined in Colo. Rev. Stat. §25-7-106.8(1)(a).

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for auxiliary power units or idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight, gross vehicle weight, or bridge formula weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (2 Colo. Admin. Code §601-4:7). APU weight allowance has been modified in Colorado State Patrol administrative rule to allow 550 lbs. However, no change has been made in State legislation as of yet. So, although State legislation says 400 lbs., enforcement will allow 550 lbs.

Other Exemptions

Vehicles Constructed for Special Types of Work: Digger derrick and bucket boom trucks operated by electric utilities on a non-Interstate highway are allowed 21,000 lbs. for a single axle (Colo. Rev. Stat. §42-4-507[2][b.5]). Vehicles equipped with a self-compactor and used solely for transporting trash are exempted from the single axle and tandem axle limits (Colo. Rev. Stat. §42-4-507[3][a]).

Authorized emergency vehicles, public transportation vehicles, road maintenance and construction equipment, implements of husbandry, and farm tractors can be temporarily moved upon the highway without a permit (Colo. Rev. Stat. §42-4-510[9]).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Colorado Department of Transportation or the Colorado State Patrol are authorized to issue permits for transporting non-divisible loads20 that exceed State weight limits on highways within each agency's respective jurisdiction. The State offers several different types of permits, each with different purposes and restrictions, including single-trip permits, special permits, or annual permits.

An overweight divisible load with a quad axle grouping may be issued a permit for up to 110,000 lbs., and an overweight divisible load with two or three axles may be issued a permit for up to 97,000 lbs. These permits do not allow travel on Interstate highways.

The Department of Transportation may issue super-load permits for combination vehicles occupying two lanes and with a weight of 500,000 lbs. or more (Colo. Rev. Stat. §42-4-510).

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Colorado State statute.

Grandfathered Routes: I-25 from New Mexico to Wyoming; I-70 from UT to Exit 90; I-70 from Exist 259 to Kansas; I-76 from I-70 Junction to Nebraska; I-225 from I-25 Junction to I-70 Junction; I-270 from I-76 Junction to I-70 Junction.

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Connecticut

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Connecticut are found in Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann. §14-262 through §14-270 (available on the State's Web site at http://search.cga.state.ct.us/dtsearch_pub_statutes.html). Provisions related specifically to weight limits begin at Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann. §14-267a.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Connecticut, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits.

  1. Connecticut allows 22,400 lbs. on a single axle and 42,500 lbs. on a tandem axle.
  2. Connecticut allows exemptions for certain commodities, including milk and refuse.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State's bridge formula (adopted from the FBF). The State's adopted bridge formula allows for 80,000 lbs. maximum on 5-axle TST combinations and up to 84,000 lbs. on six axles, provided the distance between the first and last axles is 43 feet or more. See Exhibit 14 for a summary of Connecticut's weight provisions under regular operations (Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann. §14-267a).

Exhibit 14: Summary of Connecticut Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 22,400 lbs. per axle (if axles are spaced 6 feet apart or more) 18,000 lbs. (if less than 6 feet apart)
Tandem Axle 36,000 lbs. (if axles of tandem are less than 6 feet apart)
Tridem Axle Per FBF
Gross Weight 73,000 lbs. or 80,000 lbs. and application of FBF*
Other n/a
* To operate above 73,000 lbs., there must be a minimum of 51 feet between the center of the first axle and the center of the last axle.

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Milk: Bulk milk tankers are allowed a gross vehicle weight of up to 99,000 lbs. (Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann. §14-267a[b][7]).21

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for auxiliary power units or idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight, gross vehicle weight, or bridge formula weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann. §14-267c).22

Other Exemptions

Vehicles Constructed for Special Types of Work: Any vehicle, private or publicly owned, engaged in the business of collecting refuse, may be operated on any non-Interstate road or highway with a weight on the rear axle(s) exceeding axle weight limitations by 7,000 lbs. and a combined weight on the rear axles of up to 44,500 lbs. (Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann. §14-269a).

Tow Trucks: A wrecker that has been issued an annual wrecker towing or transporting permit may tow or haul a motor vehicle in excess of the axle limits, gross vehicle weight limits, or FBF. An additional single-trip permit is required for weights in excess of 160,000 lbs. (Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann. §14-262a).

Government-Owned Vehicles: Legal provisions related to permits and fees for overweight vehicles do not apply to the Federal Government, the State, municipalities, or fire departments (Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann. §14-270).

Non-Divisible Loads Operating Under Special Permit

The Commissioner of Transportation or other authority in charge of repairing or maintaining any highway or bridge is authorized to issue permits for transporting vehicles or combinations of vehicles or vehicles and load, or other objects not conforming to State weight limits, but, in the case of motor vehicles, only the Commissioner of Transportation is authorized to issue such permits. Permits may limit travel routes, time of travel, or rate of speed or include any other condition considered necessary, provided the Department of Transportation does not suffer any loss of Federal revenue (Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann. §14-270).

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Connecticut State statute.

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Delaware

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Delaware are found in Del. Code Ann. tit. 21, §§4501 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://delcode.delaware.gov/title21/c045/index.shtml). State regulations related to overweight permits are in Del. Admin. Code §§2405-1.0 et seq.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Delaware, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. Delaware State law allows a single axle load of up to 22,400 lbs. and a tandem axle load of 36,000 lbs. on all highways that are not Interstates or U.S. numbered routes.
  2. State law provides exemptions and tolerances for certain agricultural vehicles.23

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State's bridge formula (Del. Code Ann. tit. 21, §4503 for Interstate highways and U.S. numbered routes; Del. Code Ann. tit. 21, §4502 for all other highways). The State's adopted bridge formula allows for 80,000 lbs. maximum on five axle and greater TST combinations. See Exhibit 15 for a summary of Delaware's weight provisions under regular operations (Del. Code Ann. tit. 21, §4502 and §4503).

Exhibit 15: Summary of Delaware Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs. on Interstates and U.S. numbered routes
22,400 lbs. on all other highways
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs. on Interstates and U.S. numbered routes
36,000 lbs. on all other highways
Tridem Axle 60,000 lbs. for SU vehicles on all other highways
Gross Weight 2 axle GVW: 40,000 lbs.
3 axle GVW: 54,000 lbs. on Interstates and U.S. numbered routes
65,000 lbs. on all other highways*
4 axle GVW: 74,000 lbs. on Interstates and U.S. numbered routes
73,280 on all other highways
5 axle GVW: 80,000 lbs.
Other n/a
* For vehicles traveling to and from any construction site in the State and vehicles containing agricultural products, this limit is 70,000 lbs. (Del. Code Ann. tit. 21, §4502[c][2]).

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Agricultural Products, Farm Operations, and Livestock:24 The gross weight limit for certain three-axle vehicles that contain agricultural products is 70,000 lbs., provided they pay a fee of $100 per vehicle for this extra weight capacity (Del. Code Ann. tit. 21, §4502[c][2]). Vehicles registered as farm trucks or commercial vehicles controlled or operated by a farmer are limited to 40,000 lbs. for any coupled axle space greater than 48 inches (Del. Code Ann. tit. 21, §4502[c][9]). Farm loaded trucks and farm vehicles carrying harvested products or livestock are granted a 3 percent tolerance for gross vehicle and axle weight limits (Del. Code Ann. tit. 21, §4502[c][9]).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for auxiliary power units or idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight, gross vehicle weight, or bridge formula weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less. This exemption pertains to vehicles traveling on Interstate highways and U.S. numbered routes (Del. Code Ann. tit. 21, §4503[f]).

Other Exemptions

Implements of Husbandry: Farm equipment being temporarily operated, moved, or transported on a highway when a farmer is engaged in agriculture-related practices is exempt from State weight limits while traveling on Interstate and U.S. numbered highways (Del. Code Ann. tit. 21, §4503[e]); farm equipment being temporarily operated, moved, or transported on a highway is exempt from State weight limits while traveling on all other highways (Del. Code Ann. tit. 21, §4501[h]).

Fire trucks: Fire trucks owned or used by an organized fire company are exempt from State weight limits while traveling on State or supplemental highways (Del. Code Ann. tit. 21, §4501[h]) and while traveling on Interstate and U.S. numbered highways (Del. Code Ann. tit. 21, §4503[e]).

Tow Trucks: A vehicle being towed with one set of axles free of the roadway surface is exempt from State weight limits while traveling on State or supplemental highways (Del. Code Ann. tit. 21, §4501[h]).

Construction Traffic: The gross weight limit for certain three-axle vehicles that are traveling to and from any construction site in the State is 70,000 lbs., provided they pay a fee of $100 per vehicle for this extra weight capacity (Del. Code Ann. tit. 21, §4502[c][2]).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Delaware Secretary of Transportation is authorized to issue permits for the operation of vehicles that exceed State weight limits. State law allows for single-trip or multitrip permits in qualifying circumstances; 1-year blanket permits may be issued to operators of self-propelled cranes (Del. Code Ann. tit 21, §4504).

Overweight permits do not have specified maximum weight limits. A designated "superload" is a vehicle load exceeding 120,000 lbs. gross vehicle weight. Superloads and any vehicle load exceeding 25,000 lbs. per axle are subject to review by the Bridge Management Section of the State Department of Transportation (Del. Admin. Code §2405-5.0). Additional State regulations related to overweight permits are in Del. Admin. Code §§2405-1.0 et seq.

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Delaware State statute.

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District of Columbia

The laws governing truck size and weight in the District of Columbia can be found in D.C. Admin. Code tit. 18, §§2500 et seq. (available on the District's Web site at http://www.dcregs.dc.gov/Gateway/TitleHome.aspx?TitleNumber=18).

Summary of District Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in the District of Columbia, several provisions allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. The maximum weight allowed on a single axle is 21,000 lbs. for vehicles with a gross weight under 73,000 lbs.
  2. The maximum weight allowed on tandem axles is 37,000 lbs. for vehicles with a gross weight under 73,000 lbs.
  3. The maximum weight allowed on three axles is 65,000 lbs., with a spacing of 40 feet between the extremes of the axle group.
  4. The District of Columbia provides a tolerance of 1,000 lbs. for axle loads.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operation (operating without a special permit) is governed by the district's weight table. See Exhibit 16 for a summary of the District of Columbia's weight provisions under regular operations (D.C. Admin. Code tit. 18, §2505).

Exhibit 16: Summary of District of Columbia Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 21,000 lbs.
20,000 lbs. when GVW is 73,000 lbs. or greater
Tandem Axle 37,000 lbs.
34,000 lbs. when GVW is 73,000 lbs. or greater
Tridem Axle Per District's weight table
Gross Weight 79,000 lbs.
Other 1,000 lbs. tolerance on axle loads
* Any axle spaced less than 8 feet and 1 inch from any other axle, measured between the centers of the nearest axles, is considered as part of an axle group.
** When the semitrailer length in a TST combination is 48 feet or more, the maximum weight on a three-axle group where the minimum axle spacing is 5 feet is 43,500 lbs. Where the minimum spacing is 6 feet, the maximum weight is 45,000 lbs.

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

None

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

None

Other Exemptions

Fire Trucks: The provisions governing size, weight, and load in D.C. do not apply to fire trucks (D.C. Admin. Code tit. 18, §2500.2).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Director of the District Department of Transportation is authorized to issue permits for the operation of vehicles that exceed district size and weight limits. Permits must describe the vehicle, load, and routes. The permits may be single-trip or continuous operation and may include seasonal or other restrictions (D.C. Admin. Code tit. 18, §2508). The district generally limits the maximum weight on a single axle under permit to 21,000 lbs. A 1,000 lbs. tolerance is provided for axle or gross loads operating under special or annual permits (D.C. Admin. Code tit. 18, §2505.4).

In addition, no vehicle that exceeds district weight restrictions may cross a bridge in the District of Columbia without the Director's written permission (D.C. Admin. Code tit. 18, §2510).

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in District of Columbia law.

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Florida

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Florida are found in Fla. Stat. Ann. §316-500 through §316-565 (available on the State's Web site at http://www.leg.state.fl.us/statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&URL=0300-0399/0316/0316ContentsIndex.html). Additional provisions related to overweight permits and "Turnpike Tandems" are in State regulations at Fla. Admin. Code §§14-26.0041 et seq. and Fla. Admin Code §§14-61.0012 et seq., respectively.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Florida, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. State law allows up to 40,000 lbs. on a tandem axle.
  2. State law includes a 10 percent weight allowance for axle weight limits.

Regular Operations25

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the FBF on Interstate highways, by the State bridge formula26 on non-Interstate highways, as well as by provisions related to axle spacing and limits on single axle loads. See Exhibit 17 for a summary of Florida weight provisions under regular operations (Fla. Stat. Ann. §316-535).

Exhibit 17: Summary of Florida Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs. (22,000 lbs. with 10 percent tolerance)
Tandem Axle 40,000 lbs. (44,000 lbs. with 10 percent tolerance)
Tridem Axle Per FBF
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Other 10 percent scale tolerance*
* The Florida Department of Transportation is required to publish weight tables and charts that incorporate the 10 percent tolerance into its figures (Fla. Stat. Ann. §316-535[7] and §316-545[2][a]). As a result, State tables such as those published on the State's Web site at http://www.dot.state.fl.us/statemaintenanceoffice/motorcarrier.shtm indicate a single axle weight limit of 22,000 lbs. and a tandem weight limit of 44,000 lbs. The gross weight of any vehicle or combination of vehicles may not exceed 80,000 lbs., including enforcement tolerances, either on Interstate or non-Interstate highways (Fla. Stat. Ann. §316-535[4 – 5]).

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Perishable Food Crops: The Governor may declare an emergency when there is a breakdown in the normal public transportation facilities necessary in moving perishable food crops grown in Florida. During such emergency, the Department of Transportaion is authorized to set new weight limits and designate routes, excluding Interstate highways, to facilitate the trucking of perishable food crops (Fla. Stat. Ann. §316.565).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for idle reduction technology similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to gross vehicle weight or bridge formula weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (Fla. Stat. Ann. §316.545[3][c]).

Other Exemptions

Vehicles Constructed for Special Types of Work: The following vehicles are not required to meet State axle spacing requirements:

  • Dump trucks
  • Concrete mixing trucks
  • Trucks engaged in waste collection and disposal
  • Fuel oil and gasoline trucks designed and constructed for a special type of work or use, when operated as a SU

Any such vehicles are limited to a single axle limit of 20,000 lbs. and 550 lbs. per inch tire width plus scale tolerances, up to a total gross vehicle weight of 70,000 lbs. (Fla. Stat. Ann. §316.535[6]). These vehicles are not allowed the exemption for emission reduction equipment (Fla. Stat. Ann. §316.545[3][c]).

Tow Trucks: While moving a disabled vehicle, tow trucks or wreckers will not be penalized for exceeding State weight limits (Fla. Stat. Ann. §316.530[3]). The Department of Transportation may issue a special blanket permit to authorize a wrecker to tow a disabled vehicle where the combination exceeds State weight limits and must supply a map showing the routes on which the wrecker may safely tow disabled vehicles for all special permit classifications for which the wrecker applies (Fla. Stat. Ann. §316.550[5]).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The State Department of Transportation, with respect to highways under its jurisdiction, is authorized to issue permits for the operation of a vehicle or combination of vehicles that exceeds State size and weight limits. The Department is authorized to promulgate rules and regulations concerning the issuance of permits (Fla. Stat. Ann. §316.550[2 and 6]). State regulations require the Department to consider various criteria when evaluating permit requests and prescribing the conditions for their use, including whether the load can be reasonably dismantled or disassembled (Fla. Admin. Code §14-26.00425[1][a]).

Self-propelled Truck Cranes: A permit may authorize a self-propelled truck crane operating off the Interstate Highway System to tow a motor vehicle that does not weigh more than 5,000 lbs. if the combined weight of the crane and the towed vehicle does not exceed 95,000 lbs. (Fla. Stat. Ann. §316.550[3]).

Sealed Container Cargo Units: A permit may authorize a gross vehicle weight of 100,000 lbs. (Fla. Admin. Code §14-26.01311).27

"Turnpike Tandems": State regulations define a "Turnpike Tandem" as a combination of truck tractor, semitrailer, and trailer that operates as a SU and in which either the semitrailer or the trailer unit is longer than 28 feet but neither the semitrailer nor the trailer unit is longer than 48 feet (Fla. Admin. Code §14-61.0012). The Department of Transportation's Road User Permits Office is authorized to issue permits for oversize or overweight Turnpike Tandems to be operated on the Florida Turnpike System only (Fla. Admin. Code §14-61.0016[2][a]). For a Turnpike Tandem, the gross weight of the truck tractor and the first semitrailer cannot exceed 80,000 lbs.; the maximum gross weight of the unit of dolly and second trailer cannot be more than 67,000 lbs. or the limit calculated under the State bridge formula, whichever is less; and the gross weight cannot exceed 147,000 lbs. (Fla. Admin. Code §14-61.0017[3]).

Blanket (multitrip) permits are issued for various vehicles and configurations, on particular routes, for GVW of up to 199,000 lbs. (Fla. Admin. Code §§14-26.008).

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Florida State statute.

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Georgia

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Georgia are found in Ga. Code Ann. §§32-6-20 et seq. (available via LexisNexis at http://www.lexisnexis.com/hottopics/gacode/Default.asp).

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Georgia, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits. The State of Georgia:

  1. Allows 20,340 lbs. on a single axle;
  2. Allows 40,680 lbs. on a tandem axle on non-Interstate highways;
  3. Allows 61,020 lbs. for a tridem axle on non-Interstate highways;
  4. Allows vehicles carrying several commodity types to exceed State weight limits on non-Interstate highways up to 23,000 lbs. on any single axle and 46,000 lbs. on any tandem axle; and
  5. Allows an additional 5 percent variance for transportation of specified commodities within a 100-mile radius of the point of origin; poultry waste is allowed the 5 percent variance within a 250-mile radius. Many of these exemptions are limited to transportation from a farm or other point of origin to a processing facility.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) generally follows the Federal limits with a few exceptions. Georgia has adopted the FBF as its State bridge formula. See Exhibit 18 for a summary of Georgia's weight provisions under regular operations (Ga. Code Ann. §32-6-26).

Exhibit 18: Summary of Georgia Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,340 lbs. (18,000 lbs. + 13 percent) with low pressure tires
18,080 lbs. (16,000 lbs. + 13 percent) with high pressure, solid rubber, or cushion tires
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
40,680 on non-Interstate highways (if vehicle is less than 55 feet long and GVW is less than 73,280)
Tridem Axle Per FBF
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.; subject to FBF if gross weight of vehicle is between 73,280 lbs. and 80,000 lbs.
Other 1,000 lbs. tolerance on axle loads
* Not specified in statute but are derived by calculating 113 percent of 18,000 lbs. and 113 percent of 16,000 lbs., respectively (see §32-6-26[b])

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

State weight limits may be exceeded on any non-Interstate highway28 without a permit if the load on any single axle does not exceed 23,000 lbs., the load on any tandem axle does not exceed 46,000 lbs., and the total gross weight of the vehicle and load does not exceed 80,000 lbs. for vehicles hauling the following:

  • Forest products from the forest where cut to the first point of marketing or processing;
  • Live poultry or cotton from a farm to a processing plant;
  • Feed from a feed mill to a farm;
  • Naturally occurring raw ore or mineral, including either block or sawed granite, from the quarry or stockpile area to a processing plant located in the same or an adjoining county and construction aggregates hauled to any point, unless otherwise prohibited;
  • Solid waste or recovered materials from points of generation to a solid waste handling facility or other processing facility;
  • Concrete that is in a freshly mixed and in an unhardened State for delivery to a customer; and
  • Poultry waste from the point of origin to a farm (Ga. Code Ann. §32-6-26[g][1])

A vehicle hauling these products or any other agricultural or farm product from a farm to the first point of marketing or processing is permitted a 5 percent variance from State weight limits within a 100-mile radius of the farm or point of origin. In addition, a vehicle hauling poultry waste from the point of origin to a farm is permitted a 5 percent variance from State weight limits within a 250-mile radius of the farm or point of origin (Ga. Code Ann. §32-6-26[g][2 – 3]).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for auxiliary power units or idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to single axle weight, tandem axle weight, gross vehicle weight, or any group of axles, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (Ga. Code Ann. §32-6-27[a][3]).

Other Exemptions

None.

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Commissioner of the Georgia Department of Transportation (or the Commissioner's designee) is authorized to issue permits for the transportation of non-divisible loads that exceed State size and weight limits, provided that the vehicle's operation on public roads does not threaten to unduly damage a road or any appurtenance thereto (Ga. Code Ann. §32-6-28[a][1][A]).

Annual permits are available for vehicles with a GVW of up to 100,000 lbs. and a single axle weight of up to 25,000 lbs. Single- and multitrip permits may be issued to any vehicle or load allowed by Federal law (Ga. Code Ann. §32-6-28[b][1]).

An annual commercial wrecker emergency tow permit may be issued for vehicles with a single axle weight of up to 21,000 lbs. or a tandem axle weight of up to 40,000 lbs. (Ga. Code Ann. §32-6-28[b][3])29

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Georgia State statute.

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Hawaii

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Hawaii are found in Hawaii Rev. Stat. §291-3 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol05_Ch0261-0319/HRS0291/HRS_0291-0035.htm).

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Hawaii, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. Vehicles following the State bridge formula are allowed up to 88,000 lbs. GVW on non-Interstate highways.
  2. Hawaii allows up to 22,500 lbs. on a single axle.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by both the State bridge formula and the FBF. Hawaii has adopted the FBF as the gross weight limit on Interstate highways. All other public roads, streets, and highways are governed by the State formula.30 See Exhibit 19 for a summary of Hawaii weight provisions under regular operations (Hawaii Rev. Stat. §291-35 and §291-39[c]).

Exhibit 19: Summary of Hawaii Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 22,500 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle 42,500 lbs.
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs. on Interstate highways
88,000 lbs. on all other highways
Other 11,250 lbs. per single tire
On non-Interstate highways, no citation is issued for violating weight provisions unless a load exceeds State weight limits by more than 2 percent (when a permanently installed scale is used) or by more than 5 percent (when a portable scale is used).

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Agriculture Operations: No permit is required for vehicles used in agriculture operations to cross State highways at locations specified by the Director of Transportation (Hawaii Rev. Stat. §291-36[k]).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

None.

Other Exemptions

None.

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Director of Transportation is authorized to issue permits for operating on State highways for a vehicle, a vehicle combination, self-propelled construction or farm equipment, or special mobile equipment that exceeds State size and weight limits. The Director also has the authority to issue permits for any vehicle that exceeds State weight limits and is transporting products on State highways from the place they were harvested or stored to the place where they are processed or used. These permits can be issued for a single trip or for continuous operation and may prescribe route, speed, or other restrictions (Hawaii Rev. Stat. §291-36[a – d]).

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Hawaii State statute.

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Idaho

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Idaho are found in Idaho Code §§49-1001 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://www.legislature.idaho.gov/idstat/Title49/T49CH10.htm).

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Idaho has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 105,500 lbs. GVW on all NN routes in the State, which includes the Interstate system. See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Idaho, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. Idaho allows a maximum of 37,800 lbs. for tandem axles when gross weight does not exceed 79,000 lbs. GVW on the Interstate with certain exempt commodities.
  2. Vehicles hauling agricultural products are allowed an additional 2,000-pound tolerance on any axle, bridge, or GVW limit on non-Interstate highways.31
  3. Authorities with jurisdiction are authorized to designate special routes on highways that allow vehicles carrying logs, poles, piling, and mining material at weights in excess of State limits.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operation (operating without a special permit) is governed by three different weight tables. Idaho has adopted the FBF for vehicles traveling on Interstate highways. A second weight table exists for vehicles traveling on non-Interstate highways. An alternate weight table is provided in Idaho State law for vehicles containing loads of specific products32 on non-Interstate highways. See Exhibit 20 for a summary of Idaho weight provisions under regular operations (Idaho Code §49-1001, §49-1002, and §49-1004).

Exhibit 20: Summary of Idaho Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle Per State weight table
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Other 10,000 lbs. per wheel

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Logs, Poles, Piling, and Mining Material: The Idaho Transportation Board or other authorities in charge of, or having jurisdiction over, a highway are authorized to designate and post a highway or a section of highway or bridge over which loads of logs, poles, piling, or material from mines that has not been finally processed may be transported in continuous operation by motor vehicles in excess of State weight limits (Idaho Code §49-1008).

Agricultural Products: Vehicles owned and operated by a farmer or designated agents transporting agricultural products may be operated on any non-Interstate highway up to 2,000 lbs. in excess of any axle, bridge, or gross vehicle weight limit established in Idaho Code §49-1001. Such extra weight will not apply to posted bridge weights or other seasonal or temporary weight limit postings (Idaho Code §49-1011[3]).33

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

The State confirmed that the common exemption is 550 lbs. above GVW for an auxiliary power unit whose purpose is to reduce engine idling emissions is allowed through enforcement but is not adopted specifically in statute.

Other Exemptions

None.

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Idaho Transportation Board is authorized to issue a special permit to the owner or operator of any oversize or overweight vehicle to be moved or carried over and on highways and bridges. The permit may limit the time of use, specific highways and bridges that may be traveled, or any other restrictions. Non-divisible vehicles or combinations of vehicles hauling non-divisible loads in excess of State weight limits must pay separate fees as set forth in statute (Idaho Code §49-1004[1 – 2]). Contact with the State confirmed these permits are available for all loads, divisible and non-divisible.

Refuse/Sanitation: When owned by or under contract to or under authority of a city, county, or State agency, refuse/sanitation trucks transporting refuse may be operated on non-Interstate public highways in accordance with State weight limits, except that such trucks equipped with single rear axles are allowed 24,000 lbs. on that single rear axle when specifically authorized by the public highway agency governing the highways over which the refuse/sanitation truck is operating and provided the owner or operator has paid an annual operating fee for a permit or the fee has been waived (Idaho Code §49-1001[10]).34

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: These include all National Network Routes, including Interstate Highways.

129,000 Lbs. Route Network: Idaho began a pilot project35 for a route network on which vehicles may be permitted to transport loads in excess of 105,001 lbs. but not exceeding 129,000 lbs.

The Idaho Transportation Board may issue permits for overweight travel on these routes. Any additions and deletions to the network must be approved by the State legislature for State routes. A local highway agency can determine such routes on roads under its jurisdiction, except that no local agency is allowed to approve a route that provides a thoroughfare for interstate carriers to pass through the State (Idaho Code §49-1004[4]).36

The following is a list of each route in the pilot program:

  • U.S.-20 Montana border to its junction with SH-33; SH-33 to its junction with U.S.-20; U.S.-20 to its junction with U.S.-93; U.S.-93 to its junction with SH-25; SH-25 to its junction with SH-50; SH-50 to its junction with U.S.-30; U.S.-30 to its junction with SH-74; SH-74 to its junction with U.S.-93; U.S.-93 to the Nevada border
  • U.S.-91 from its junction with SH-34 to the Utah border
  • U.S.-30 from its junction with I-15 to the Wyoming border
  • U.S.-95 south from milepost 66 (Fruitland) to its junction with SH-55
  • SH-19 from its junction with U.S.-95 (Wilder) to its junction with I-84B (Caldwell)
  • SH-78 from its junction with SH-55 (Marsing) to its junction with SH-51; SH-51 to its junction with SH-78; SH-78 to its junction with I-84B (Hammett)
  • SH-67 from its junction with SH-51 (Mountain Home) to its junction with SH-78 (Grandview)
  • SH-55 from intersection with Farmway Road to junction with U.S.-95
  • SH-25 from its junction with SH-24 to its junction with SH-27 (Paul)
  • SH-25 from its junction with U.S.-93 to milepost 27 (Hazelton)
  • SH-24 from intersection with U.S.-93 to its intersection with SH-25
  • U.S.-20 from its intersection with New Sweden Road to its junction with SH-22/33
  • SH-34 from milepost 78 to the junction with U.S.-91
  • U.S.-26 from its junction with U.S.-91 north to its intersection with Gallatin/West 23rd Street in Idaho Falls
  • U.S.-91 from the intersection with Canyon Road to the junction with U.S.-26
  • SH-22 from its junction with I-15 northbound ramps (Dubois) to its junction with SH-33
  • SH-45 from its junction with SH-78 to its junction with I-84 business loop; I-84 business loop to its junction with exit 35 (Nampa Boulevard/Northside Boulevard)
  • SH-87 from Montana border to junction with U.S.-20
  • SH-33 from its junction with SH-31 (Victor) to its junction with SH-33 spur; SH-33 spur to its junction with U.S.-20
  • SH-28 from junction with SH-22 to junction with SH-33
  • SH-38 from milepost 0.689 to milepost 1.318 at Malad
  • SH-27 from its junction with SH-25 (Paul) to its junction with I-84B (Burley); I-84B to its junction with SH-27; SH-27 to milepost 0 (Oakley)
  • SH-81 from its junction with SH-77 (Malta) to its junction with U.S.-30 (Burley)
  • U.S.-30 from its junction with SH-81 at Burley to its junction with SH-50 at Kimberly
  • U.S.-93 spur from its junction with U.S.-30 to its junction with U.S.-93 at Twin Falls
  • U.S.-93 from its junction with U.S.-93 spur to its junction with U.S.-30 at Twin Falls
  • U.S.-30 from its junction with SH-74 at Twin Falls to its junction with I-84 business loop at Bliss
  • U.S.-26 from its junction with SH-75 (Shoshone) to its junction with I-84 exit 141 westbound ramps (Bliss); I-84 business loop from its junction with I-84 exit 141 westbound ramps to its junction with U.S.-30 (Bliss)
  • SH-46 spur from its junction with SH-46 (Wendell) to its junction with I-84 exit 155 eastbound ramps
  • SH-46 from its junction with U.S.-20 to its junction with I-84 exit 157 eastbound ramps (Wendell)
  • U.S.-20 from its junction with U.S.-93 at Carey to its junction with I-84 business loop at interchange 95; I-84 business loop from interchange 95 to its junction with SH-51; SH-51 to its junction with SH-67
  • SH-51 from its junction with SH-67 to its junction with SH-78
  • SH-44 from its junction with SH-55 (Eagle) to its junction with I-84 exit 25 eastbound ramps
  • U.S.-20/26 from its junction with U.S.-95 (Parma) to its junction with I-84 exit 26 westbound ramps
  • U.S.-20 from its junction with U.S.-33 at Sugar City south to its junction with U.S.-20 business loop/Holmes Avenue; U.S.-20 business loop/Holmes Avenue south to its junction with U.S.-26/Yellowstone; U.S.-26 from its intersection with U.S.-20 business loop/Holmes Avenue south to Gallatin. (Idaho Code §49-1004[4])
Exhibit 21: Idaho Designated 129,000-pound Routes
Road map of the State of Idaho with several towns and cities blown up to depict roads within those localities. Different routes are color coded to designate allowed routes for combination vehicles that fall within defined length specifications  and weigh up to 129,000 pounds as well as to identify local routes.

[ Return to list of States. ]


Illinois

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Illinois are found in Ill. Rev. Stat. ch. 625, §§5/15-101 et seq. Additional provisions related to overweight permits are found in Ill. Rev. Stat. ch. 625, §§5/15-301 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?DocName=062500050HCh%2E+15+Art%2E+I&ActID=1815&ChapterID=49&SeqStart=151600000&SeqEnd=153800000).

More information about Illinois's truck weight limits can be found on the Illinois Department of Transportation's Web site at http://www.idot.illinois.gov/doing-business/permits/Oversize-and-Overweight-Permits/index.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Illinois, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits.

  1. Illinois State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles.
  2. Vehicles registered as Special Haul Vehicles (SHV) have various axle and bridge formula exemptions except when using the National System of Interstate and Defense Highways.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State's bridge formula, which is adopted from the FBF, with some exceptions as noted above. Exhibit 22 provides a summary of Illinois' weight provisions under regular operations (Ill. Rev. Stat. ch. 625, §5/15-111).

Exhibit 22: Summary of Illinois Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.*
Tridem Axle 42,500**
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Other 800 lbs. per inch width of non-pneumatic tire when any axle exceeds 16,000 lbs. 
* If the distance between two axles is 96 inches or less, the two axles are tandem axles (Ill Rev Stat. Ch. 15 § 15-111).
** Tridem is not defined in statute. This number, with spacing of between nine and 10 feet. Came from the State weight table in a chart in Ill Rev Stat. Ch. 15 § 15-111(a).

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

None.

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for auxiliary power units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight, gross vehicle weight, or bridge formula weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (Ill. Rev. Stat. ch. 625, §5/15-112[e-5]).

Other Exemptions

Government-Owned Vehicles: Overweight vehicles that are owned by the United States, the State, a political subdivision of the State, or a municipality must have a permit, but all fees are waived (Ill. Rev. Stat. ch. 625, §5/15-315[a]).

Implements of Husbandry: State provisions governing size, weight, and load do not apply to implements of husbandry that are temporarily operated or towed in a combination upon a highway, provided that the combination does not have more than three vehicles or, in the case of hauling fresh, perishable fruits or vegetables from a farm to the point of first processing, more than three wagons being towed by an implement of husbandry (Ill. Rev. Stat. ch. 625, §5/15-101[b]).

Fire trucks and Snow Plows: State provisions governing size, weight, and load do not apply to fire trucks or snow equipment for snow and ice removal operations owned or operated by any governmental body (Ill. Rev. Stat. ch. 625, §5/15-101[b]).

Public Utilities: Weight limits do not apply to vehicles operated by a public utility when transporting equipment required for the emergency repair of public utility facilities or properties or water wells (Ill. Rev. Stat. ch. 625, §5/15-111[a][4]).

Rendering Materials: Trucks not in combination and used exclusively for the collection of rendering materials are allowed 22,000 lbs. on a single axle but no more than 40,000 lbs. on a tandem axle. This provision does not apply to trucks on an Interstate highway (Ill. Rev. Stat. ch. 625, §5/15-111[a][6]).

Garbage Trucks: A truck not in combination, equipped with a self-compactor or an industrial roll-off hoist and roll-off container and used exclusively for garbage, refuse, or recycling operations is allowed 22,000 lbs. on a single axle, 40,000 lbs. on a tandem axle or a 2-axle vehicle, and 54,000 lbs. gross weight on a 3-axle vehicle. Such trucks are not subject to the bridge formula. This provision does not apply to trucks on an Interstate highway (Ill. Rev. Stat. ch. 625, §5/15-111[a][7]).

Special Haul Vehicles: Vehicles registered as SHV:37

  • Except as provided in (7.5), tandem axles on a three-axle SHV registered truck manufactured before or in the model year of 2014 and first registered in Illinois before January 1, 2015, with a distance greater than 72 inches but not more than 96 inches between any series of two axles, are allowed a combined weight on the series not to exceed 36,000 lbs., and neither axle of the series may exceed 20,000 lbs. Any vehicle of this type manufactured after the model year of 2014 or first registered in Illinois after December 31, 2014, may not exceed a combined weight of 34,000 lbs. through the series of two axles, and neither axle of the series may exceed 20,000 lbs. (Ill Rev Stat. Ch. 15 § 15-111 (a) (8)).
  • A four-axle truck mixer, registered as an SHV, used exclusively for mixing and transporting concrete in the plastic state, and not operated on a highway that is part of the National System of Interstate Highways, is allowed 20,000 lbs. on any single axle; 36,000 lbs. on a series of axles greater than 72 inches but not more than 96 inches; and 34,000 lbs. on any series of two axles greater than 40 inches but not more than 72 inches. The gross weight of this vehicle may not exceed the weights allowed by the bridge formula for four axles. The bridge formula does not apply to any series of three axles while the vehicle is transporting concrete in the plastic state, but no axle or tandem axle of the series may exceed the maximum weight permitted under this paragraph. (Ill Rev Stat. Ch. 15 § 15-111 (a) (9)).
  • Combinations of vehicles, registered as SJVs, that include a semitrailer manufactured before or in the model year of 2014 and registered in Illinois before January 1, 2015, having five axles with a distance of 42 feet or less between extreme axles may not exceed the following maximum weights: 20,000 lbs. on a single axle; 34,000 lbs. on a tandem axle; and 72,000 lbs. gross weight. This combination of vehicles is not subject to the bridge formula. For all those combinations of vehicles that include a semitrailer manufactured after the effective date of P.A. 92-0417, the overall distance between the first and last axles of the two sets of tandems must be 18 feet 6 inches or more. Any combination of vehicles that has had its cargo container replaced in its entirety after December 31, 2014, may not exceed the weights allowed by the bridge formula (Ill Rev Stat. Ch. 15 § 15-111 (a) (10)).
  • Two additional "Special Haul Vehicle" exemptions were added in 2013 through new State legislation. These include three-axle concrete discharge trucks and three-axle sewer cleaning jetting vacuum trucks. See Appendix A for links to these new provisions.

Tow Trucks: A combination of a disabled vehicle and a tow truck is allowed a single rear axle weight of 24,000 lbs. and 44,000 lbs. on a tandem rear axle, with no gross weight limits, provided that neither the disabled vehicle nor the tow truck exceeds State weight limits individually. Such vehicles may travel on State routes up to 20 miles from the initial point of wreck or disablement, or to a point where repairs are actually to occur, without a permit (Ill. Rev. Stat. ch. 625, §5/15-111[a][12]).

Highway Construction and Maintenance Equipment: The Department of Transportation must, upon an application in writing from any local authority, issue an annual permit authorizing the movement over roads under the Department's jurisdiction of oversize highway construction, transportation, utility, and maintenance vehicles or equipment owned by or registered in the name of the local authority. No fee can be charged for these permits (Ill. Rev. Stat. ch. 625, §5/15-301[d]).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

A vehicle with a fully functional APU is allowed an additional 400 lbs. or the certified unit weight, whichever is less. The additional weight may be allowed in gross, axles, or bridge formula weight limits above the legal weight limits except when overweight on an axle or axles of the towed unit or units in combination (Ill Rev Stat. Ch. 15 § 15-112(e-5)).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Illinois Department of Transportation has the authority to issue special permits with respect to highways under its jurisdiction for loads that cannot be reasonably dismantled or disassembled or are otherwise non-divisible. The permits may be issued as single-trip permits or for limited continuous operation and must indicate on which routes the vehicle may travel. They also may establish time limitations, limit the number of trips, or include other restrictions. Permitted vehicles are allowed a scale tolerance of up to 2,000 lbs. on a single axle, 3,000 lbs. on a tandem axle, and 5,000 lbs. gross weight above the permitted limits (Ill. Rev. Stat. ch. 625, §5/15-301[a] – [c], [f]).

The Department also has the authority to authorize, at its discretion, the movement of a vehicle in violation of any size or weight requirement that would not ordinarily be eligible for a permit if extreme necessity is shown that the vehicle and load should be moved without unnecessary delay. This discretional authority is limited to shipments of livestock, hazardous materials, liquid concrete in a mobile cement mixer, or hot asphalt (Ill Rev. Stat. ch. 625, §5/15-301[l]).

Agricultural Products: The Illinois Department of Transportation is authorized to issue special permits for a period of up to 40 days that authorize the movement of agricultural commodities on the following:

  • Two-axle SU vehicles with axle loads not to exceed 35 percent above State axle weight limits
  • Three- or four-axle vehicles with axle loads not to exceed 20 percent above State axle weight limits
  • Five-axle vehicles not to exceed 10 percent above State axle weight limits

The total gross weight of the vehicle, however, may not exceed the maximum gross weight of the registration class of the vehicle, and all vehicles operating under permit must be registered with the Secretary of State. Trips cannot exceed 50 miles from a field, an on-farm grain storage facility, a warehouse, or a livestock management facility. Vehicles with such permits may travel on any non-Interstate highway. "Agricultural commodities" are defined as follows:

  1. Cultivated plants or agricultural produce, including but not limited to corn, soybeans, wheat, oats, grain sorghum, canola, and rice;
  2. Livestock, including but not limited to hogs, horses, sheep, and poultry;
  3. Ensilage; and
  4. Fruits and vegetables.

If the Governor declares an emergency harvest situation, this special permit is not required from September 1 through December 31 for otherwise eligible vehicles carrying agricultural commodities, provided the weight does not exceed 20 percent above normal limits (Ill. Rev. Stat. ch. 625, §5/15-301[e] – [e-1]).

Raw Milk: The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) can issue special permits for continuous limited operation authorizing the transport of raw milk loads exceeding the State weight limits, provided no single axle exceeds 20,000 lbs. and the gross weight does not exceed 80,000 lbs. Such permits do not allow travel on Interstate highways (Ill. Rev. Stat. ch. 625, §5/15-301[o]).

Routes

For the purpose of truck size and weight limits, Illinois State code requires the DOT to maintain and provide a truck route system of Class I, Class II, and Class III highways. See http://www.gettingaroundillinois.com (Ill Rev Stat. Ch. 15 § 15-116). These route systems have been designated by IDOT statewide as the following:

  • Class I highways – Includes all Interstates and select U.S. and State highways (limited access divided highways),
  • Class II highways – Includes select U.S. and State Routes, as well as some local street segments (non-Interstate routes with the same size and weight limits as Class I highways), and
  • Class III highways – Allows GVW of 80,000 lbs. but further restricts vehicle width and length allowances.

However, particular weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Illinois State statutes.

[ Return to list of States. ]


Indiana

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Indiana are found in Ind. Code Ann. §§9-20-1-1 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://www.in.gov/legislative/ic/2010/title9/ar20/).

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Indiana has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 22,400 lbs. on a single axle, 36,000 lbs. on a tandem axle, and 127,400 lbs. GVW on parts of the Interstate system (Indiana Toll Roads).38 See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Indiana, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. Indiana State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles and commodities.
  2. Indiana State statute allows for two types of weight tolerances for axle and/or GVW.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State bridge formula, which is adopted from the FBF (Ind. Code Ann. §§9-20-4-1 et seq.). Within that law, Indiana also has a "grandfather law" that allows vehicles to apply either the State bridge formula or the weight limits that were in effect on January 4, 1975, whichever is greater, on any highway that is not designated as a heavy duty highway. State law allows the designation of heavy duty and extra heavy duty highways that are each assigned different weight limits than standard highways in the State (Ind. Code Ann. §§9-20-5-1 et seq.). See Exhibit 23 for a summary of Indiana weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 23: Summary of Indiana Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Characteristic State and Interstate Highways Heavy Duty Highways Extra Heavy Duty Highways
Single Axle 20,000 lbs. 22,400 lbs. 18,000 lbs.
65,000 lbs. on one specified intersection, see Routes section
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs. 36,000 lbs.
(18,000 lbs. for each axle)
32,000 lbs.*
Tridem Axle 50,000 lbs. with lift axle, 48,000 lbs. otherwise
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs. 80,000 lbs.
90,000 lbs. on Indiana Toll Road**
134,000 lbs.
90,000 lbs. on one specified route, see Routes section
264,000 lbs. on one specified intersection, see Routes section
Other 800 lbs. per inch width of tire
1.5 percent scale tolerance
800 lbs. per inch width of tire
1.5 percent scale tolerance
800 lbs. per inch width of tire
1,650 lbs. per inch width of tire on one specified intersection, see Routes section
1.5 percent scale tolerance
*An axle in an axle combination may not exceed 13,000 lbs. per axle, or 26,000 lbs. total for a two-axle group, with the exception of one tandem group, which may weigh 16,000 lbs. per axle, or 32,000 lbs. total (Ind. Code Ann. §9-20-5-5).
**Statute (Ind. Code Ann. §9-20-4-1(b)(4)) calls for the DOT to make rules on weight limits for the toll road. The 90,000-lb. limit is not in the statute but was confirmed by the State for this report.

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Farm Commodities: A vehicle or a combination of vehicles transporting farm commodities from the place of production to the first point of delivery where the commodities are weighed and the title to the commodities is transferred is allowed 10 percent additional weight to the maximum gross weight. However, this increase in weight does not apply on Interstate highways or on bridges or highways where more stringent weight limits have been imposed by executive order through the Department of Transportation. Farm commodities include logs, wood chips, bark, sawdust, and bulk milk. In the case of wood chips, bark, and sawdust, the 10 percent tolerance applies at all times for both gross weight and axle weight (Ind. Code Ann. §9-20-4-2).

Refuse Vehicles: Special restrictions apply to a garbage truck, a truck-trailer combination, or a truck-wagon combination that is either a municipal waste collection and transportation vehicle39 or a disposal plant transporting vehicle that is laden with dead animals or animal parts. Except for Interstate highways, the vehicle will be allowed up to 24,000 lbs. on a single axle and 42,000 lbs. on a tandem axle.40 (Ind. Code Ann. §§9-20-11-1 et seq.).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for auxiliary power units or idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption increases axle weight, gross vehicle weight, and bridge formula weight limits by 400 lbs. (Ind. Code Ann. §9-20-4-1[b][5]).

Alternative Fuels: None41

Other Exemptions

Fire Trucks: State weight limits do not apply to fire trucks owned or operated by a political subdivision or a volunteer fire Department (Ind. Code Ann. §9-20-2-2[c]).

Implements of Husbandry: State weight limits do not apply to implements of agriculture used in farming operations while traveling on non-Interstate highways (Ind. Code Ann. §9-20-2-2[b][2]).

Highway Construction Machinery: Machinery, vehicles and/or equipment used in highway construction or maintenance by the Indiana Department of Transportation, counties, or municipalities are exempt from State weight limits except for Interstate highways (Ind. Code Ann. tit. 9, Article 20, §2-2(b)(1)).

Farm Drainage Machinery: Farm drainage machinery is exempt from State weight limits except for Interstate highways.

Tow Trucks: Tow trucks,42 when towing a disabled vehicle, are exempt from size and weight requirements when traveling a distance of 50 miles or less.43

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Indiana Department of Transportation is authorized to issue a range of single-trip, time-limited, and annual permits for overweight loads (Ind. Code Ann. §§9-20-6-1 et seq.).44 Permits may designate the route to be traveled and other restrictions (Ind. Code Ann. §9-20-6-8).

Toll Roads: Annual toll gate permits may be issued to commercial motor vehicles that meet the toll road size and weight limits, for a distance of up to 15 miles to or from a toll road gate. These permits are only valid when used in conjunction with toll road travel (Ind. Code Ann. §9-20-6-3).

Sealed Ocean-going Containers: Annual permits may be obtained to transport sealed ocean-going containers that are being transported to or from a distribution facility. Vehicles or vehicle combinations transporting sealed ocean-going containers may not exceed 95,000 lbs. (Ind. Code Ann. §9-20-6-2[d]).

Extra Heavy-Duty Highways: Vehicles traveling on extra heavy duty highways with a total gross weight between 80,000 lbs. and 264,000 lbs. must obtain a special registration permit on an annual basis (Ind. Code Ann. §9-20-5-7).

Towing Disabled Vehicles: A special towing permit may be issued for combinations of recovery vehicles that are towing disabled vehicles, but these permits are not needed for travel that does not exceed 50 highway miles (Ind. Code Ann. §9-20-2-3 and §9-20-9-11).

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: I-80/90 Indiana Toll Road from Toll Gate 21 to Ohio; I-90 Indiana Toll Road from Illinois to Toll Gate 21.

Heavy-Duty and Extra Heavy-Duty Highway Designations: The Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) may designate a highway as a heavy duty highway or as an extra heavy duty highway. Each designation is assigned its own weight limit (Ind. Code Ann. §§9-20-5-1 et seq.). See Exhibit 24 for map of these routes and the information below for their designated routes.

Indiana has designated these extra heavy-duty highways in northern Indiana. On most of these highways, with a few exceptions that are specified in statute, drivers may haul divisible loads with a total gross weight of up to 134,000 lbs. (subject to legal axle weights) with a special permit, commonly known as a "Michigan Train Permit" (http://www.in.gov/dor/files/osowhandbook.pdf).

Extra Heavy-Duty Highways (Ind. Code Ann. §9-20-5-4):

  • Highway 41, from 129th Street in Hammond to Highway 312
  • Highway 312, from Highway 41 to State Road 912
  • Highway 912, from Riley Road in East Chicago to the U.S. 20 interchange
  • Highway 20, from Clark Road in Gary to Highway 39
  • Highway 12, from one-fourth (1/4) mile west of the Midwest Steel entrance to Highway 249
  • Highway 249, from Highway 12 to Highway 20
  • Highway 12, from one and one-half (1 1/2) miles east of the Bethlehem Steel entrance to Highway 149
  • Highway 149, from Highway 12 to a point thirty-six hundredths (.36) of a mile south of Highway 20
  • Highway 39, from Highway 20 to the Michigan State line
  • Highway 20, from Highway 39 to Highway 2
  • Highway 2, from Highway 20 to Highway 31
  • Highway 31, from the Michigan State line to Highway 23
  • Highway 23, from Highway 31 to Olive Street in South Bend
  • Highway 35, from South Motts Parkway thirty-four hundredths (.34) of a mile southeast to the point where Highway 35 intersects with the overpass for Highway 20/Highway 212
  • State Road 249 from U.S. 12 to the point where State Road 249 intersects with Nelson Drive at the Port of Indiana
  • State Road 912 from the 15th Avenue and 169th Street interchange one and six hundredths (1.06) miles north to the U.S. 20 interchange
  • U.S. 20 from the State Road 912 interchange three and seventeen hundredths (3.17) miles east to U.S. 12
  • U.S. 6 from the Ohio State line to State Road 9
  • U.S. 30 from Allen County/Whitley County Line Road (also known as County Road 800 East) to State Road 9.(20) State Road 9 from U.S. 30 to U.S. 6
  • State Road 39 from Interstate 80 to U.S. 20
  • (Provision 22) State Road 3 north from U.S. 6 to U.S. 20, U.S. 20 west from State Road 3 to State Road 9, State Road 9 north from .S. 20 to the Michigan State line (However, the total gross weight, with load, of a vehicle or combination of vehicles operated with a special weight permit on these highways may not exceed 90,000 lbs.)45, 46
  • (Provision 23) Highway 912, at an intersection approximately thirty hundredths (.30) of a mile southwest of the intersection of Dickey Road and Riley Road in East Chicago (The total gross weight, with load, of a vehicle or combination of vehicles operated with a special weight permit on this highway may not exceed 264,000 lbs., a maximum wheel weight of 1,650 lbs. per inch width of tire, or a single axle weight of 65,000 lbs.).47, 48

Maximum size and weight limit expiration on extra heavy-duty highways (Ind. Code Ann. tit. 9, Article 20, §5-5): Except as provided in subsection (b), the maximum size and weight limits for vehicles operated with a special weight permit on an extra heavy-duty highway are as follows:

  • A vehicle may not have a maximum wheel weight, unladen or with load, in excess of 800 lbs. per inch width of tire, measured between the flanges of the rim.
  • A single axle weight may not exceed 18,000 lbs.
  • An axle in an axle combination may not exceed 13,000 lbs. per axle, with the exception of one tandem group that may weigh 16,000 lbs. per axle or a total of 32,000 lbs.
  • Except as provided in section 4(a)(22) of this chapter, the total gross weight, with load, of any vehicle or combination of vehicles may not exceed 134,000 lbs.
  • Axle spacings may not be less than 3 feet 6 inches between each axle in an axle combination.
  • Axle spacings may not be less than 8 feet between each axle or axle combination.
  • A vehicle operated in accordance with section 4(a)(23) of this chapter may not have a maximum wheel weight, unladen or with load, in excess of 1,650 lbs. per inch width of tire, measured between the flanges of the rim, or single axle weight that exceeds 65,000 lbs.
  • (c) This section expires on the later of the following dates:
    • The date on which rules described in section 1(c)(2) of this chapter are finally adopted
    • December 31, 2014.

(Ind. Code Ann. tit. 9, Article 20, §5-5)

Exhibit 24: Indiana Heavy-Duty and Extra Heavy-Duty Highway Map
Road map of Indiana with extra heavy duty highway color coded to indicate weight restrictions as well as road type, including interstate toll roads, freeways, US roads, State roads, and interchanges as well as State and county bundaries.

[ Return to list of States. ]


Iowa

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Iowa are found in Iowa Code Ann. §§321.452 et seq., and provisions involving permits for overweight vehicles can be found in Iowa Code Ann. §§321E.1 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at https://www.legis.iowa.gov/law/iowaCode/sections?codeChapter=321E&year=2014).

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Iowa has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 129,000 lbs. GVW on parts of the Interstate system.49 See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Iowa, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits.

  1. Six-axle vehicles on non-Interstate highways are allowed a gross vehicle weight of 90,000 lbs.
  2. Seven-axle vehicles on non-Interstate highways are allowed a gross vehicle weight of 96,000 lbs.
  3. Iowa State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles and commodities.
  4. Some agricultural vehicles are allowed higher single axle weights and GVWs on a seasonal basis.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operation (operating without a special permit) is governed by the provisions in Iowa Code Ann. §321.463. Iowa has multiple weight tables that pertain to primary, non-primary, and non-Interstate highways.50 Separate tables for primary highways, non-primary highways, and exceptions are provided in Iowa Code §321.463[5][a-e]. See Exhibit 25 for a summary of Iowa weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 25: Summary of Iowa Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 35,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle Per State weight table
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs. on primary and non-primary highways
90,000 lbs. on non-Interstate highways for six-axle vehicles
96,000 lbs. on non-Interstate highways for seven-axle vehicles
Other Five-axle livestock transports with a spread-axle semitrailer: 86,000; Six-axle: 90,000; Seven-axle: 96,000*
* Commercial Motor Vehicles not operating on the Interstate (Iowa Code §321.463[5][c][1])

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Feeder, Grain Cart, or Tank Wagon: The weight on any one axle of a fence-line feeder, grain cart, or tank wagon operated on State highways may not exceed 24,000 lbs. from February 1 through May 31 or 28,000 lbs. from June 1 through January 31. The maximum gross vehicle weight of these vehicles may not exceed 96,000 lbs. (Iowa Code Ann. §321.463[4][b][1]).

Livestock Transporters: Vehicles transporting livestock on non-Interstate highways may exceed the single axle weight limit as long as the axle group is still within State limits. A livestock vehicle with five axles, with a minimum distance between the extreme axles of 61 feet and a minimum distance between the two rear axles of at least 8 feet 1 inch, is allowed a gross vehicle weight of up to 86,000 lbs. (Iowa Code Ann. §321.463[5]a][2] and [6]).

Raw Materials: For vehicles transporting raw materials to or from a construction site and operating on a non-Interstate highway along an approved route of travel, the load on a single or tandem axle within a larger group of axles may exceed State limits by 10 percent, as long as the group of axles as a whole does not exceed State limits (Iowa Code Ann. §321.463[7]).

Emission Reduction / Special Fuel Exemptions

None

Other Exemptions51

Fire Trucks and Maintenance Equipment: State weight limits do not apply to fire trucks and road maintenance equipment owned or leased by a State or local authority (Iowa Code Ann. §321.453).52

Tow Trucks: A vehicle that is towing a wrecked or disabled vehicle is exempt from State weight limits (Iowa Code Ann. §321.463[9]).

Implements of Husbandry: State weight limits generally do not apply to implements of husbandry when moved or moving on a non-Interstate highway. However, a tracked implement of husbandry has a gross vehicle weight limit of 96,000 lbs. when operated on highways; the limit is 80,000 lbs. when operated on non-Interstate highway bridges. Self-propelled implements of husbandry that are used exclusively for the application of plant food materials, agricultural limestone, or agricultural chemicals, however, are subject to State weight limits or applicable permits (Iowa Code Ann. §321.453, §321.463[2], §321.463[4][a], §321.463[4][b][2], §321.463[5][2][e], §321E.7[4], and §321E.8A).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Iowa Department of Transportation may issue annual, multitrip, and single-trip permits for the movement of indivisible loads that exceed State gross vehicle weight limits. Permitted vehicles are still generally subject to State axle weight limits, with exceptions (Iowa Code Ann. §321E.2 and §321E.7[1]).

Cranes: The Iowa Department of Transportation issues permits to self-propelled cranes being temporarily moved on streets, roads, or highways; in such a case, these vehicles may have a gross weight of 24,000 lbs. on any single axle (Iowa Code Ann. §321E.7[1][a]).

Construction Machinery:53 The Iowa Department of Transportation issues permits to self-propelled construction machinery other than cranes being temporarily moved on streets, roads, or highways, vehicles which may have a maximum gross weight of 36,000 lbs. on any single axle equipped with flotation pneumatic tires with a minimum size of 26.5 inches by 25 inches. These vehicles are also allowed a 1,000 lb. weight tolerance on any one axle, provided that the total gross weight of the vehicle or combination of vehicles does not exceed the gross weight allowed by the permit (Iowa Code Ann. §321E.7[1][b][2] and §321E.7[2]).

Manufacturing Equipment: Manufacturers may be granted a permit for the movement of machinery or equipment that exceeds State axle weight limits if it is manufactured or assembled in Iowa, mounted on pneumatic tires, and only travels for distances of up to 25 miles at speeds of 20 miles per hour or less over an approved route (Iowa Code Ann. §321E.7[1][b][3]).

Implements of Husbandry: An annual permit may be obtained for operating implements of husbandry that exceed State axle weight limits on non-Interstate highways, provided that they were ordered or purchased before February 1, 2007, equipped with flotation tires, designed to be loaded and operated in the field, and used exclusively for the application of plant food materials, agricultural limestone, or agricultural chemicals (Iowa Code Ann. §321E.8A).

Other Permits: Single-trip permits may be issued to operate vehicles with gross vehicle weights up to 100,000 lbs.,54 but State single-axle weight limits still apply (Iowa Code Ann. §321E.9).

Multitrip permits may be issued to operate vehicles with gross vehicle weights up to 156,000 lbs., but State single axle limits still apply (Iowa Code Ann. §321E.9A).

Multitrip permits up to 12 months in duration may be issued to transport indivisible loads on specified highways to an alternative energy construction site or staging area for alternative energy transportation. These vehicles are allowed up to 256,000 lbs. gross vehicle weight but must adhere to single axle limits of 20,000 lbs. each. The permit-issuing authority may include other restrictions or require special considerations before issuing the permit (Iowa Code Ann. §321E.9B).

Compacted Rubbish: With appropriate approvals, the Department of Transportation is authorized to issue annual special permits to operate compacted rubbish vehicles and vehicles that transport compacted rubbish over designated routes from a rubbish collection point to a landfill area. These vehicles may exceed State gross vehicle weight limits but may not exceed 20,000 lbs. on a rear axle or, for tandem axle vehicles or transferable auxiliary axle vehicles, 36,000 lbs. on the rear axles (Iowa Code Ann. §321.473).55

Hay, Straw, or Stover: Permits may be issued for vehicles exceeding State weight limits, with divisible loads of hay, straw or stover without a finding of special or emergency situations, if the movement meets other permitting requirements (Iowa Code Ann. §321E.29).56

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: LCV combinations may operate on all Interstate System routes in Sioux City, Iowa, and its commercial zone per 49 CR 1048.101. However, the grandfather provision allows 129,000 lbs. GVW only when entering Sioux City from South Dakota or South Dakota from Sioux City. 95,000 lbs. GVW is the grandfathered limit when entering Sioux City from Nebraska or Nebraska from Sioux City.

Systems:57

  • The non-primary highway system includes all city and county roads.
  • The primary highway system includes all State and Federal highways and the Interstate System.

[ Return to list of States. ]


Kansas

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Kansas are found in Kan. Stat. Ann. §§8-1901 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://www.kslegislature.org/li_2012/b2011_12/statute/008_000_0000_chapter/008_019_0000_article/). Kansas Administrative Regulations Article 36 is available at http://www.sos.ks.gov/pubs/kar/2009/3%20036_36-Department%20of%20Transportation,%202009%20KAR%20Vol%203.pdf.

For more information, please see "Trucking' Through Kansas" for oversize/overweight information and a list of all permits: http://www.truckingks.org/ktc_handbook.pdf.

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Kansas has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 22,000 lbs. on a single axle and 120,000 lbs. GVW on parts of the Interstate system (specifically, the Kansas Turnpike Authority). See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Kansas, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. Kansas allows up to 85,500 lbs. GVW on non-Interstate highways.
  2. Kansas State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by State axle limits and the State gross weight table. The majority of the provisions that exceed Federal weight limits apply to non-Interstate highways. See Exhibit 26 for a summary of Kansas weight provisions under regular operations (Kan. Stat. Ann. §8-1908 and §8-1909).

Exhibit 26: Summary of Kansas Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle* 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle** 43,500 lbs. at 10ft spacing
42,000 lbs. at more than 8 feet spacing but less than 9 feet
42,500 lbs. at more than 9 feet spacing but less than 10 feet
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs. on Interstate highways
85,500 lbs. on non-Interstate highways
Other 10,000 lbs. per wheel
* A tandem axle is defined as any two consecutive axles spaced not less than 40 inches and not more than 96 inches apart (Kan. Stat. Ann. §8-1908[d][2]).
** A tridem or "triple" axle is defined as three or more consecutive axles spaced more than 96 inches and not more than 120 inches apart (Kan. Stat. Ann. §8-1908[d][3]).

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

None.

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight and gross vehicle weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (Kan. Stat. Ann. §8-1917).

Other Exemptions

Sand and Gravel: State gross weight limits do not apply to truck tractor and dump semitrailer or truck trailer combinations when used exclusively to transport sand, salt for highway maintenance operations, gravel, slag stone, limestone, crushed stone, cinders, coal, blacktop, dirt, or fill material to a construction site, a highway maintenance or construction project, or other storage facility. These vehicles must still comply with any application of the State weight table that may be required to determine triple and quad axle weight limits (Kan. Stat. Ann.§8-1909[a][3]).

Fire Trucks: The State weight limits do not apply to fire trucks temporarily moved on a highway (Kan. Stat. Ann. §8-1901[d]).

Implements of Husbandry: The State weight limits do not apply to implements of husbandry temporarily moved on a highway (Kan. Stat. Ann. §8-1901[d]).

Road Machinery: The State weight limits do not apply to road machinery temporarily moved on a highway (Kan. Stat. Ann. §8-1901[d]).

Garbage/Refuse/Solid Waste: Trucks specifically designed, equipped, and used exclusively for garbage, refuse, or solid waste disposal operations and loaded with garbage, refuse, or waste are exempt from State weight limits on any single, tandem, triple, or quad axle, but they cannot exceed 60,000 lbs. on three axles or 40,000 lbs. on two axles, regardless of axle spacing, and are subject to State gross weight limits (Kan. Stat. Ann. §8-1901[e] and §8-1911[b]).

Farm Tractors and Farm Machinery: State weight limits generally do not apply to farm tractors, which are not permitted to travel on Interstate highways. Fertilizer-spreading trucks, which also cannot travel on Interstate highways, are exempt from State weight limits on any single, tandem, triple, or quad axle, but they cannot exceed 60,000 lbs. on three axles or 40,000 lbs. on two axles, regardless of axle spacing. Permits are not required for transporting overweight loads on non-Interstate highways where the load consists of farm tractors, combines, fertilizer dispensing equipment or other farm machinery, or machinery being transported to be used for terracing or soil or water conservation work on farms (Kan. Stat. Ann. §8-1901[d], §8-1901[e], §8-1902[b], and §8-1911[b]).

Government-Owned Vehicles: Permits are not required for overweight vehicles owned by counties, cities, and other political subdivisions of the State. Under this exemption, travel is not permitted on Interstate highways (Kan. Stat. Ann. §8-1911[b]).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Kansas Secretary of Transportation may issue special permits for the movement of vehicles or vehicle combinations in excess of State weight limits. The permits must State specific routes for travel and be designated as a single-trip or annual operation; they may also include other restrictions or limitations. The secretary may also issue permits for the operation of vehicle combinations on a route designated by the secretary between a Kansas turnpike authority toll booth and a motor-freight truck terminal located within 10 miles of any such toll booth, or within 20 miles of a toll booth at the northeastern end of the Turnpike (Kan. Stat. Ann. §8-1911 and §8-1914).

Cotton: The gross weight on tandem axles of a cotton module issued a special permit may not exceed 50,000 lbs. A cotton module with a tandem gross axle weight of 50,000 lbs. or less will not be considered a superload as defined in rules and regulations of the Kansas Department of Transportation (Kan. Stat. Ann. §8-1916).

Farm Tractors and Farm Machinery: No permit will be required to authorize moving or operating any farm tractors, combines, fertilizer dispensing equipment or other farm machinery, or machinery being transported to be used for terracing or soil or water conservation work upon farms, or vehicles owned by counties, cities, and other political subdivisions of the State. This exemption does not extend to trucks owned by counties, cities, and other political subdivisions specifically designed and equipped and used exclusively for garbage, refuse, or solid waste disposal operations (Kan. Stat. Ann. Chapter 8. Article 19§11(b)).

Kansas Turnpike Authority:58 The Secretary of Transportation, with respect to highways under the Secretary's jurisdiction, and local authorities, with respect to highways under their jurisdiction, may issue permits for operating combinations of vehicles operating on a route designated by the Secretary or local authority between a Kansas turnpike authority toll booth and a motor-freight truck terminal located within a 10-mile radius of any such toll booth, except at the northeastern end of the turnpike, at which location a 20-mile radius applies (Kan. Stat. Ann. Chapter 8. Article 19§14).

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: I-35 Kansas Turnpike Authority (KTA) from OK to KTA Exit 127; I-70 KTA from KTA Exit 182 to KTA Exit 233; I-335 KTA From KTA Exit 127 to KTA Exit 177; I-470 KTA from KTA Exit 177 to KTA Exit 182.

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Kentucky

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Kentucky are found in Ky. Rev. Stat. §§189.221 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://www.lrc.ky.gov/statutes/chapter.aspx?id=38038). Provisions related specifically to the "extended weight coal or coal by-products haul road system" are in Ky. Rev. Stat. §177.9771. Kentucky administrative code for commercial vehicles is found in Kentucky Administrative Regulations Title 603 (available at http://www.lrc.ky.gov/kar/TITLE603.HTM).

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Kentucky, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits. Unless otherwise stated, these exemptions only apply to non-Interstate highways in the State:

1. Kentucky allows 48,000 lbs. on a tridem axle. 2. Kentucky allows several special weight tolerances on non-Interstate highways. A 5 percent tolerance per axle load is allowed for any vehicle hauling any load (under 80,000 lbs. GVW) on non-Interstate highways. 3. Kentucky State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles and commodities. 4. Kentucky State statute allows for several types of weight tolerances for axle weights and GVW for specific commodities and vehicles.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by two sections of State law. Ky. Rev. Stat. §189.222 authorizes the Secretary of the State Transportation Cabinet to officially increase size and weight limits on designated State-maintained highways or portions thereof, up to the maximums shown in Exhibit 27, if, in the Secretary's opinion, these higher limits are justified by the highway's strength, safety, and durability. On all other highways, the lower limits in Ky. Rev. Stat. §189.221 apply. See Exhibit 27 for a summary of Kentucky's weight provisions under regular operations (Ky. Rev. Stat. §189.221, §189.222, and §189.2301).

Exhibit 27: Summary of Kentucky Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle 48,000 lbs.
Gross Weight* Designated highways: As determined by the Secretary of the Transportation Cabinet, up to 80,000 lbs.
All other highways: 36,000 lbs.
80,000 lbs. on class AAA highways
62,000 lbs. on class AA highways
44,000 lbs. on class A highways
Other Class AAA highways: No axle weight limits for vehicles hauling 79,999 lbs. or less** Designated highways: 700 lbs. per inch of the aggregate width of all the tires on a single axle (or 20,000 lbs. GVW, whichever is less) All other highways: 600 lbs. per inch of the combined width of the tires Non-Interstate highways: 5 percent tolerance per axle load (under 80,000 lbs. GVW)
* Weight limits for Class A, AA, and AAA highways are found in administrative regulations at 603 KAR 5:066. See Exhibit 29 for a map of the Kentucky highway system by class.
** A vehicle that has a valid registration of a declared gross vehicle weight, including any towed unit, of 80,000 lbs. or less is exempt from axle weight limits when operating on any State-maintained highway that is classified as a AAA highway, if the vehicle is hauling 79,999 lbs. or less and has written verification of the weight of the load (Ky. Rev. Stat. §189.2301).

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Coal: Any vehicle, when registered with a declared gross weight of 80,000 lbs. and when transporting coal or coal by-products over public highways that are part of the extended weight coal or coal by-products haul road system or portions thereof (see Routes section below), may be operated in excess of State weight limits by paying a decal fee, up to these limits:

  • A SU truck having one steering axle and two axles in tandem: 90,000 lbs. with a tolerance of 5 percent;
  • A SU truck having one steering axle and three axles in tridem arrangement: 100,000 lbs. with a tolerance of 5 percent;
  • Tractor-semitrailer combinations with five or more axles: 120,000 lbs. with a tolerance of 5 percent; and
  • Any motor carrier involved in transporting coal or coal by-products that meets gross axle weights of 20,000 lbs. per axle and 12,000 lbs., with no stated upper limit, but must pay an additional $10 per 1,000 lbs. of registered weight above 80,000 lbs. (Ky. Rev. Stat. §177.9771).

Agricultural Commodities: Vehicles carrying meats, livestock, poultry or agricultural crop products from a farm or other point of origin to first market are allowed a GVW of up to 80,000 lbs. on all State highways.

Vehicles registered and engaged exclusively in the transportation of these commodities are exempted from axle weight limits and subject only to total gross weight limits; these vehicles also may exceed the GVW limit by a tolerance of ten percent, except on Interstate highways.

Other commercial vehicles engaged exclusively in the transportation of tankage or animal residues, livestock, or agricultural products are subject to axle as well as gross weight limits but may exceed axle weight limits by a tolerance of 10 percent on non-Interstate highways.

A vehicle carrying supplies, materials, or equipment necessary to carry out a farming operation that produces agricultural crop products, meats, livestock, or poultry is allowed a GVW of up to 80,000 lbs. on all State highways but not an additional 10 percent tolerance (Ky. Rev. Stat. §189.222[2] – [5], [10]).

Primary Forestry Products: Vehicles carrying primary forestry products—including but not limited to sawdust, wood chips, bark, slabs, or logs—from point of origin to first market are allowed a GVW of up to 80,000 lbs. on all State highways. Vehicles registered and engaged exclusively in the transportation of these products are exempted from axle weight limits and are subject only to total gross weight limits. They also may exceed the GVW limit by a tolerance of 10 percent, except on Interstate highways. Other commercial vehicles engaged in the transportation of primary forestry products are subject to axle as well as gross weight limits but may exceed either by a tolerance of 10 percent on non-Interstate highways (Ky. Rev. Stat. §189.222[2] – [6]).

Ready-Mix Concrete: Vehicles registered and engaged exclusively in the transportation of ready-mix concrete are exempt from axle weight limits, except on Interstate highways, and are subject only to total gross weight provisions (Ky. Rev. Stat. §189.222[5]).

Refuse and Solid Waste: Vehicles designed for, registered for, and engaged exclusively in collecting and hauling refuse are exempt from the axle weight provisions and subject only to total gross weight provisions, except on the Interstate system (Ky. Rev. Stat. §189.222[7]). Vehicles engaged exclusively in the transportation of solid waste are allowed a ten percent axle weight tolerance on non-Interstate highways (Ky. Rev. Stat. §189.222[10]).

Building Materials: Any truck hauling building materials or traveling to a road construction project may haul up to 80,000 lbs., including the load, on any State highway, without a permit (Ky. Rev. Stat. §189.221[6]). Any vehicle hauling building materials to a home is allowed to travel on any State road without a permit if it conforms with posted bridge weight limits on its route and relevant axle weight limits, even if the weight exceeds gross weight limits (Ky. Rev. Stat. §189.2226[2]).

Aggregate: Vehicles engaged exclusively in the transportation of crushed stone, fill dirt and rock, soil, bulk sand, coal, phosphate muck, asphalt, or concrete are permitted a tolerance of 10 percent of the axle weight provisions, except on Interstate highways (Ky. Rev. Stat. §189.222[10]).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

None.

Other Exemptions

Government-Owned Vehicles: State weight limits do not apply to motor trucks, semitrailer trucks, or trailers owned by Federal, State, county, or city governmental units (Ky. Rev. Stat. §189.280).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The State Transportation Cabinet, Department of Vehicle Regulation, Division of Motor Carriers may promulgate administrative regulations governing the issuance of annual permits to operate motor vehicles transporting non-divisible loads that exceed State weight limits. The gross weight of a motor vehicle operating under this kind of annual overweight permit must not exceed 120,000 lbs., and its movement must be limited to a specific route that is specified on the permit. In general, non-divisible loads are subject to the weight limits in Exhibit 28 (Ky. Rev. Stat. §189.2717).

Exhibit 28: Summary of Kentucky Truck Weight Limits for Non-Divisible Loads
Single Axle 15,000 lbs. (with axle spacing of less than 42 inches)
Tandem Axle 40,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle 65,000 lbs.
Gross Weight 120,000 lbs.
Other Dual wheel axle: 20,000 lbs.
* Any axle spaced less than 8 feet and 1 inch from any other axle, measured between the centers of the nearest axles, is considered as part of an axle group.

Steel Products and Materials: The State Department of Highways may promulgate administrative regulations governing the issuance of annual permits for operating motor vehicles that exceed State weight limits, up to a GVW of 120,000 lbs., and that are transporting steel products or materials in divisible or non-divisible loads to or from manufacturing or storage facilities. The movement of the products or materials must be limited to no more than 150 miles within the State (Ky. Rev. Stat. §189.2715).

Other Permits: The State Department of Highways is also authorized to issue permits for transporting non-divisible loads that exceed State weight limits but are not eligible for the annual overweight permit or permits specific to transporting steel products or materials. Annual permits may be issued for vehicles with a GVW of up to 160,000 lbs. Single-trip permits may also be issued. The Department may limit the permitted vehicle to specified routes (Ky. Rev. Stat. §189.270).

Routes

AAA Highways: A vehicle that has a valid registration and a declared gross vehicle weight of 80,000 lbs. or less, including any towed unit, is exempt from any axle weight provisions when operating on any State-maintained highway that is classified as an "AAA" highway if the vehicle is hauling 79,999 or less. A person operating a vehicle under the provisions of this section must have written documentation verifying the weight of the load (Ky. Rev. Stat. §189.2301).

Exhibit 29: Kentucky Truck Weight Classification Map 201359
Road map of Kentucky with color coded roadways indicating AAA roadways (80,000 lb GVW limit), AA roadways (62,000 lbs. GVW), and A roadways (44,000 lbs. GVW) as well as other types of roads and parkways.

Coal Haul Highway System: The "extended weight coal or coal by-products haul road system" consists of all State-maintained toll roads or State-maintained roads that were previously toll roads and the public highways over which quantities of coal or coal by-products in excess of 50,000 tons were transported by motor vehicles during the period from January 1, 1985, through December 31, 1985. The roads in the system are updated annually. The Transportation Cabinet publishes a directory, including supporting maps and other documents, designating the official coal road system in coal impact and coal producing counties, including all public highways, roads, bridges, and streets over which quantities of coal sufficient to significantly affect the condition and State of repair of such highways, roads, bridges, and streets have been transported in the immediately preceding year. No provisions as to the extended weight coal or coal by-products haul road system authorizes any vehicle to travel in excess of State weight limits on Interstate highways (Ky. Rev. Stat. §177.977[1] & Ky. Rev. Stat. §177.9771).

Exhibit 30: Kentucky Coal Haul Highway System Map 2013
Map of Kentucky as well as blow up maps of eastern Kentucky and western Kentucky  featuring the extended weight coal haul road system, which consists of State-maintained toll roads or State-maintained roads that were previously toll roads and the public highways over which quantities of coal or coal by-products in excess of 50,000 tons are transported.

[ Return to list of States. ]


Louisiana

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Louisiana are found in La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §§32:380 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://www.legis.state.la.us/lss/lss.asp?folder=106).

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Sugarcane: The Secretary issues annual special permits to persons who operate trucks that haul sugarcane. These permits allow up to 100,000 lbs. gross vehicle weight on any State-maintained highway, including Interstate highways, for up to 100 days. Beginning August 1, 2012, the Secretary may not issue an annual special permit to any owner or operator of a vehicle hauling sugarcane who has not added an additional single axle with dual mounted tires on the sugarcane trailer for a total of six axles for the vehicle and trailer combination.60 (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32-387.7)

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Louisiana, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. Louisiana allows axle tolerances on non-Interstate highways: an additional 2,000 lbs. for single axles and 3,000 lbs. for tandum, tridum, or quadrum axles.61
  2. Vehicles with a tridum or quadrum axle are allowed up to 88,000 lbs. GVW on any non-Interstate State highway and 83,400 lbs. GVW on Interstates.
  3. Louisiana State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles and commodities.
  4. Several bulk commodities are exempt from the FBF in Louisiana.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by State axle and gross weight limits as well as the State bridge formula, which has been adopted from the FBF. See Exhibit 31 for a summary of Louisiana weight provisions under regular operations (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:386).

Exhibit 31: Summary of Louisiana Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
18,000 lbs. on high pressure or solid rubber tires
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
32,000 lbs. on high pressure or solid rubber tires
Tridem Axle 42,000 lbs.
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
83,400 lbs. for vehicle combinations with tridum or quadrum axles on Interstate highways
88,000 lbs. for vehicle combinations with tridum or quadrum axles on non-Interstate highways
Other Axle tolerances on non-Interstate highways: additional 2,000 lbs. for single axles and 3,000 lbs. for tandem, tridem, or quadrum axles
Quadrum axle: 50,000 lbs.
650 lbs. per inch width of tire

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Forest Products: Any vehicle carrying forest products in their natural state shall be allowed 37,000 lbs. per tandem axle except on the Interstate system (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:386[D]).

Bulk Commodities (various): Vehicles carrying the following bulk commodities are exempt from applying the FBF: forest products in their natural state, lumber, sand, gravel, agricultural products in their natural state, loose or mixed concrete (including asphaltic or Portland cement), or bulk liquid commodities62 (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:386[H][2]).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

The Federal weight allowance/exemption for idle emission reduction technology allowance for auxiliary power units is granted by enforcement policy in Louisiana rather than by State law; that is, the exception is not specifically enumerated in the statute. The amount that is allowed under enforcement is 400 lbs.63

Other Exemptions

Tridum/Quadrum Axles: The total gross weight limit for any combination of vehicles that has a tridum axle or a quadrum axle is 88,000 lbs. while operating on any State-maintained highway except the Interstate System and 83,400 lbs. while operating on the Interstate System within Louisiana (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:386[I]).

Vehicle Types (various): The following vehicle types are exempt from the size, weight, and load provisions under La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:386:

  • Fire trucks;
  • Vehicles and machinery used solely to build highways while actually temporarily engaged in work on a highway;
  • Implements of husbandry, including farm tractors temporarily moved upon a highway; and
  • Trolley coaches or motor buses operated under a franchise or indeterminate permit wholly within the corporate limits of a municipality having a population of 100,000 or more inhabitants.

(La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:54)

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Secretary of the Department of Transportation and Development is authorized to issue special permits for the operation of vehicles or vehicle combinations that exceed State size and weight limits if the shipment is not readily divided, broken, or dismantled or if operating such vehicles is otherwise prohibited by law; however, if the parts have been divided, broken, or dismantled from the shipment weight in the aggregate of 500 lbs. or less, then the shipment will be considered as indivisible.

The Secretary may also impose additional restrictions on the use of a special permit, including the use of additional axles, specific routes, or times of travel (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:387[B]).

Commodity-Specific Special Permits64

Farm and Forest Products: If the Secretary finds it necessary by reason of an emergency, unusual circumstances, natural catastrophe, or disaster, a permit may be issued for farm products or forest products in their natural states, allowing a gross vehicle weight of up to 100,000 lbs., although State axle limits still apply (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:387[C][2]).65

Special Harvest Season Permits: Upon application, the Secretary may issue special harvest season permits for vehicles or vehicle combinations transporting farm and forest products in their natural state, seed cotton modules, cotton seed from the gin to the mill, raw sugar from the mill to the refinery, or brewer's grain. Under these permits, the total gross weight limit is 86,600 lbs. on non-Interstate highways and 83,400 lbs. on Interstates; the single axle limit is 22,000 lbs. on non-Interstate highways and 20,000 lbs. on Interstates; and the tandem axle limit is 37,000 lbs., plus relevant axle weight tolerances, on non-Interstate highways and 35,200 lbs. on Interstates (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:387[C][3]).

Refuse/Waste ($1,000/year):66 Upon application, the Secretary may issue a special permit to any vehicle or combination of vehicles with a minimum of 18 wheels that is engaged in the transfer of household trash, garbage, refuse, waste, or recyclable waste material loaded exclusively from Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) authorized pickup stations, transfer stations, or both. These permits are also used to transfer bundled or bailed recyclable waste paper products and are not required to pick up this commodity at a DEQ site. These permits authorize up to 48,000 lbs. on a tandem axle, 60,000 lbs. on a tridum axle, 108,000 lbs. GVW for a five-axle vehicle, and 120,000 lbs. GVW for a six-axle vehicle (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. Each permit is valid for 1 year (Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:387[C][3][e – f]).

Refuse/Waste ($10/year):67 Upon application, the Secretary may issue a special permit to any vehicle or combination of vehicles with a minimum of 18 wheels that is used to transfer commercial and household trash, garbage, refuse, waste, or recyclable waste material loaded exclusively from a DEQ authorized pickup station, transfer station, or both. They are valid for 1 year and may travel only on non-Interstate highways. These permits authorize up to 37,000 lbs. on a tandem axle, 45,500 lbs. on a tridum axle, and 86,600 lbs. GVW (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:387[C][3][f][ii]).

Solid Waste: Any vehicle or combination of vehicles hauling or collecting solid waste may obtain an annual permit allowing a vehicle with tandem axles to operate with a total gross weight of 68,000 lbs. and a vehicle with tridum axles to operate with a total gross weight of 80,000 lbs. This permit covers travel on non-Interstate and Interstate highways (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:387[C][3][g]).

Commodities Traveling from River Ports to Manufacturing Facilities: The Secretary may issue special permits to vehicles transporting commodities between a port facility located outside Louisiana on the Mississippi River and a manufacturing facility located within the State where the vehicle must enter the State via a bridge crossing the Mississippi River and transport commodities to a manufacturing facility located within the same parish as that bridge. The permits must provide for size and weight limits and specify allowable routes (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:387[C][6]).

Cotton Modules: The Secretary may issue annual special permits to persons who operate trucks which haul cotton modules and are in compliance with the provisions of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations. The permit will authorize the operation of a three-axle vehicle at a gross weight of 68,000 lbs.; with a tandem axle not to exceed 48,000 lbs.; and a single axle not to exceed 20,000 lbs. These permits allow travel on any State-maintained non-Interstate highway (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:387.6).

Agronomic or Horticultural Crops: The Secretary may issue annual special permits to persons who operate vehicles hauling agronomic or horticultural crops in their natural state. The vehicle combination shall have a minimum of 18 wheels. These permits allow up to 100,000 lbs. of gross vehicle weight on non-Interstate highways (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:387.9).

Timber Cutting/Logging Equipment: Whenever a vehicle is being operated to transport two, but not more than two, pieces of timber cutting or logging equipment from one job site to another, the Secretary may issue an annual special overweight permit to the person who operates the vehicle. The permit authorizes the operation of the truck, trailer, and load thereon to operate at the maximum axle weights provided for overweight permit loads, with a gross vehicle weight not to exceed one 105,000 lbs. on non-Interstate highways (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:387.10).

Bagged Rice for Export: The Secretary may issue special annual permits for one-way hauls of bagged rice for export within a 60-mile radius of the Port of Lake Charles. These special permits authorize the operation of a vehicle or combination of vehicles with a total gross vehicle weight not to exceed 95,000 lbs. No tandem axle set equipped with low pressure pneumatic tires may exceed 34,000 lbs. on the Interstate system or 37,000 lbs. off the Interstate system. No tridem axle set equipped with low pressure pneumatic tires may exceed 42,000 lbs. on the Interstate system or 45,000 lbs. off the Interstate system (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:387.19).

Sealed Containerized Cargo (Containerboard, Kraft Liner, and Roll Pulp) for Export: The Secretary may issue special annual permits for one-way hauls from Pineville, Louisiana, to New Orleans, Louisiana, of sealed containerized cargo intended for export. This special annual permit is limited to sealed containerized cargo that contains containerboard, kraft liner, or roll pulp. The permit authorizes the operation of a vehicle or combination of vehicles with not more than five axles at a total gross vehicle weight not to exceed 90,000 lbs. and a tandem axle weight not to exceed 40,000 lbs. (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:387.16).

Sealed Intermodal Containers: The Secretary may issue a Class I or Class II Ocean Container Permit to an owner or operator of any vehicle transporting sealed intermodal containers within a 50-mile radius of a statutorily defined port or harbor district for the transport of such containers with the gross vehicle weight limitation not to exceed 80,000 lbs. for Class I and 95,000 lbs. for Class II and the axle weight not to exceed 40,000 lbs. for Class I (per tandem axle group) and 20,000 lbs. per axle for Class II (provided the rear axle set is in tridem) (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:387[J][1] – [2][a]).

Liquid Bulk Containers: The Secretary may issue a Liquid Bulk Container Permit to an owner or operator of any vehicle transporting a liquid bulk container within a 50-mile radius of a statutorily defined port or harbor district with the gross vehicle weight limitation not to exceed 95,000 lbs. and the axle weight not to exceed 20,000 lbs. per axle, provided the rear axle set is in tridem. Each vehicle issued such a permit must be equipped with a standard intermodal drop-frame chassis with twist locks to secure the liquid bulk container on the chassis (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:387[J][3][a]).

Off-Road Equipment: An annual noncritical off-road equipment permit may be issued for vehicles designated by the Department of Transportation or in the manual titled "Louisiana Regulations for Trucks, Vehicles and Loads." On such vehicles, no single axle may exceed 30,000 lbs., and no tandem or triple axle may exceed 54,000 lbs. (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:387.12).

Routes

Alternate Route for U.S. Highway No. 167: Interstate 49 from its northern intersection with U.S. Highway 167 near Meeker in Rapides Parish to its southern intersection with U.S. Highway 167 near Washington in St. Landry Parish is deemed as an alternate route for U.S. Highway 167. Any vehicle traveling under a special permit that allows travel on U.S. Highway 167 is authorized to travel Interstate 49 under the same conditions and restrictions as those applicable to its permit to travel on U.S. Highway 167 (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:387.5).

Any vehicle issued a special agronomic and horticultural crop permit may travel on the segment of Interstate 49 from its interchange with U.S. Highway 71 and U.S. Highway 167 south of the city of Alexandria and its interchange with Rapides Station Road north of the city of Alexandria as an alternate route to U.S. Highway 71 and U.S. Highway 167 Interstate route (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:3879.1).

Permitted vehicles with loads between 232,001 and 254,000 lbs. may only be allowed statewide movement on routes that are selected and approved by the Department of Transportation and Development, most of which are Interstate highways (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:387[H][2][c][iii]).

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Maine

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Maine are found in Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §§2351 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://www.mainelegislature.org/legis/statutes/29-A/title29-Ach21sec0.html ). Additional provisions regarding overweight permits are found in Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §§2380 et seq. For further clarification of weight limit laws, see the Bureau of Motor Vehicles document: https://www1.maine.gov/sos/bmv/commercial/Commercial%20Vehicle%20Laws%20&%20Regulations%20(June%206,%202012).pdf.

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Maine has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 127) to allow vehicles to operate up to 22,400 lbs. for a single axle, 41,000 lbs. for a tandem axle, 50,000 lbs. for a tridem axle, and 100,000 lbs. GVW on all Interstate and non-Interstate highways on the Maine Turnpike.68

In addition, for as long as the provisions of 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(11) affording an exemption from the Federal vehicle weight limitations for vehicles operating on all portions of the Interstate system are in effect, the Commissioner of Transportation may allow the operation of a vehicle on the Interstate system if it complies with State limits for non-Interstate highways.69, 70

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Maine, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. Maine State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of commodities and vehicles.
  2. Certain commodities are allowed a 10 percent weight tolerance over State limits provided weight limits do not exceed 24,200 lbs. for a single axle, 46,000 lbs. for a tandem axle, 54,000 lbs. for a tridem axle, and 100,000 lbs. GVW.
  3. Certain vehicles carrying certain commodities to and from certain facilities across the Canadian border are allowed increased weight limits up to 137,700 lbs. on specific routes depending on the configuration.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) on non-Interstate highways is governed by State weight limits based on the number of axles and axle spacing. Maine has also adopted the FBF as the gross weight limit on Interstates.

On non-Interstate highways, maximum weight limits are graduated per the number of axles a vehicle has: two-axle vehicles are limited to 34,000 lbs., three-axle vehicles are limited to 54,000 lbs., four-axle vehicles (and single-unit five axle vehicles) are limited to 69,000 lbs., five or more axles are limited to 80,000 lbs., and a combination of a three-axle truck tractor and tri-axle semitrailer is limited to 100,000 lbs. Maine uses the stated maximums and calculates lower limits for specific axle spacing (measured between the extreme axles excluding the steering axle):

  • On four-axle vehicles, a reduction of 1,000 lbs. for each single foot decrease in axle spacing below 18 feet;
  • On four-axle vehicles, a reduction of 2,000 lbs. for each single foot decrease in axle spacing below 24 feet; and
  • On a combination of a three-axle truck tractor and tri-axle semitrailer, a reduction of 2,000 lbs. for each single foot decrease in axle spacing below 36 feet.

Registered weight is allowed a gross weight tolerance of 500 lbs. or 2.5 percent, whichever is greater (Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §2352[2]). SeeExhibit 32 for a summary of Maine weight provisions under regular operations (Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §2353 to §2355 and §2360[15]).

Exhibit 32: Summary of Maine Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle  20,000 lbs. on Interstates when GVW exceeds 73,280
22,400 lbs. on Interstates when GVW is less than 73,280
22,400 lbs. for a six-axle combination on interstate highways
22,400 lbs. on non-Interstate highways
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs. on Interstate highways
38,000 bs. on non-Interstate highways
41,000 lbs. for six-axle combination on interstate and non-Interstate highways*
Tridem Axle** 45,000 lbs. on Interstate highways
48,000 lbs. on non-Interstate highways
50,000 lbs. for a six-axle combination on interstate and non-Interstate highways†
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs. on Interstate highways
94,000 lbs. for a four-axle SU truck in combination with a two-axle trailer on non-Interstate highways
100,000 lbs. for a qualifying combination of a three-axle truck tractor and tri-axle semitrailer
Other 600 lbs. per inch width of tire
4 percent portable scale tolerance on Interstate highways
* A vehicle consisting of a three-axle truck tractor with a tri-axle semitrailer may be operated with a maximum gross weight of 100,000 lbs. The vehicles may not be traveling on Interstate highways, the distance between the extreme axles (not including the steering axle) must be at least 36 feet, a tandem axle may not exceed 41,000 lbs., and a tri-axle may not exceed 50,000 lbs. (Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §2354).
** Maine statute refers to Tri-Axle Units, not Tridems. A tri-axle unit is three axles with spacing of 9 feet to 12 feet between the extremes. On Interstates, 45,000 lbs. is the weight limit for three axles spaced at 12 feet based on the Federal bridge formula.
† A vehicle consisting of a four-axle SU truck operating in combination with a two-axle trailer may be operated with a maximum gross weight of 94,000 lbs. Such vehicles must comply with several axle weight and spacing requirements listed in the statute (Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §2365).

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Potatoes: A farm vehicle transporting potatoes from the field to a storage or processing facility during the potato harvesting season is exempt from State axle weight limits and axle weight tolerance restrictions. To be eligible for this exemption, the farm vehicle must comply with the gross weight limits established in this chapter and must have at least 8,000 lbs. on the steering axle. This exemption does not apply on the Interstate Highway System, including that portion designated as the Maine Turnpike (Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §2353[7]).

Special Commodities: State law allows a weight tolerance for certain special commodities:

  • A vehicle loaded entirely with materials that absorb moisture during delivery (lumber, soil, farm produce, road salt, etc.);
  • Dump trucks or transit-mix concrete trucks carrying highway construction materials;
  • A vehicle loaded with a majority of products requiring refrigeration, whether by ice, or mechanical equipment; and
  • A vehicle loaded with raw ore from a mine or quarry to a place of processing.

Vehicles loaded with these commodities are not in violation of being overweight if their gross vehicle weight does not exceed 110 percent of State weight limits, provided the axle loads to do not exceed the following:

  • Single axle: 24,200 lbs.
  • Tandem axle: 46,000 lbs.
  • Tri-axle: 54,000 lbs.
  • Tri-axle unit of a 4-axle truck hauling forest products or registered as a farm truck and hauling potatoes: 64,000 lbs.71

Vehicles with five or more axles, however, may not have a tandem axle weight exceeding 44,000 lbs., and a six-axle combination of a three-axle truck and tri-axle semitrailer may not exceed a gross vehicle weight of 100,000 lbs. The tolerance for special commodities does not apply to travel on the Interstate system (Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §2357).

Forest Products: For vehicles hauling forest products exclusively and operating as a six-axle SU vehicle registered for at least 77,200 lbs., with all liftable axles in contact with the ground,72 the maximum permitted gross vehicle weight is 85,000 lbs., and fines are waived for gross vehicle weights of up to 87,499 lbs. This exemption does not apply to travel on Interstate highways (Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §2364[8]). A three-axle truck carrying forest products may operate on Interstate highways with a gross vehicle weight of 48,000 lbs. if it has a distance of at least 18 feet between extreme axles (Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §2355[3][A]).

Raw Ore: A three-axle truck carrying raw ore from a mine or a quarry may operate on Interstate highways with a gross vehicle weight of 48,000 lbs. if it has a distance of at least 18 feet between extreme axles (Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §2355[3][A]).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for auxiliary power units or idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight or gross vehicle weight, is up to 400 lbs. (Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §2360[18]).

Other Exemptions

Snow Plows: A vehicle modified for the purpose of plowing snow is exempt from the weight limits when engaged in, en route to, or returning from plowing snow or ice and is exempt from the maximum tire weight provisions at all times (Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §2353[6]).

Fire trucks: Any fire-fighting vehicle with its proper equipment that meets the National Fire Protection Association standards is exempt from the gross and axle weight limits imposed by Maine statute (Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §2353[6]).

Maintenance Vehicles: Any vehicle engaged in emergency maintenance of a public way is exempt from State weight limits (Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §2353[6]).

Construction Material: A three-axle truck carrying construction materials may operate on Interstate highways with a gross vehicle weight of 48,000 lbs. if it has a distance of at least 16 feet between extreme axles (Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §2355[3][B]).

Pilot-Program for Canadian Weight Limit Access: The Commissioner of Transportation is authorized to conduct a pilot project allowing certain commercial vehicles operating at Canadian gross weight limits to travel across the planned Calais-St. Stephen New Brunswick Bridge to the junction of U.S. Route 1 and U.S. Route 9 in Baileyville. This would allow a combination of a three-axle truck tractor with a three-axle semitrailer a gross weight limit of 108,900 lbs. and an eight-axle B-train double a gross vehicle weight of 137,700 lbs. (Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §2354-A).73

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Maine Secretary of State, acting under guidelines and advice of the Commissioner of Transportation and with the consent of the State Department of Transportation, is authorized to issue permits for the transportation of non-divisible objects that exceed State weight limits. Permits may be for single trips or multiple trips; long-term permits may be issued for up to 1 year and are limited to the particular vehicle or object being moved as well as the route on which travel may occur (Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §2382).

State law authorizes municipal officers to issue special construction permits for vehicles used on public way construction projects, United States government projects, or construction of private ways.74 (Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §2382(7)

Specific vehicles operating under Canadian weight limits allowed to cross the border: The Commissioner of Transportation, in consultation with the Department of Public Safety and the Department of the Secretary of State, is authorized to allow certain commercial vehicles at Canadian gross vehicle weight limits to travel from the United States-Canada border at Calais to Baileyville, from the United States-Canada border at Madawaska to a paper mill at Madawaska and from the United States-Canada border at Van Buren to a rail yard in Van Buren. Vehicles are allowed to travel from the United States-Canada border under the following conditions:

  • The only allowable routes of travel are from the United States-Canada border in Calais north on U.S. Route 1 to Access Road in Baileyville, east on Access Road to Domtar Woodland Mill or its successor on Main Street and north on Main Street to the Louisiana-Pacific Oriented Strand Board mill or its successor in Baileyville; from the United States-Canada border in Madawaska then directly north or south into the Fraser Papers facility or its successor in Madawaska or up Bridge Street to Mill Street in Madawaska in order to reverse direction; and from the United States-Canada border in Van Buren on Bridge Street, west to Main Street, also designated as Route 1, then north on Main Street approximately 1 ½ miles from the border.
  • Allowable truck configuration is limited to a three-axle truck tractor with a three-axle semitrailer at a gross vehicle weight of 108,900 lbs. or a three-axle truck tractor with a semitrailer-semitrailer combination, configured as a B-train double with eight axles total, at a gross vehicle weight of 137,700 lbs. The weight of the second semitrailer may not exceed the weight of the first semitrailer.
  • Maine axle weight limits, axle group limits, commodity allowances, maximum dimensions, and all other commercial vehicle limits and requirements apply, except that the B-train double overall length limit must be 82.02 feet, or 25 meters.
  • The manufacturer's ratings for gross vehicle weight, axle capacity, brake systems, and other components for which a manufacturer's rating is available may not be exceeded.
  • Each truck combination allowed under this section must display a credential obtained for a fee from the Secretary of State.

The Secretary of State, acting under guidelines and advice of the Commissioner of Transportation, is authorized to grant permits to commercial vehicles at Canadian gross vehicle weights operating under these requirements (Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §2354-C).

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Maine State statute.75

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Maryland

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Maryland are found in Md. Transportation Code Ann. §§24-101 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://mgaleg.maryland.gov/webmga/frmStatutesText.aspx?article=gtr&section=24-101&ext=html&session=2015RS&tab=subject5).

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Maryland has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 127) that exempts four-axle dump trucks registered in the State for "dump service registration" from Federal single-axle, tandem-axle, and bridge formula limits. These vehicles may only operate under this exemption on Interstate Route 68 in Garrett and Allegany counties. Also, a DSR vehicle is not subject to the gross weight or FBF unless it exceeds its maximum registered gross weight by 10 percent or one of its axles is not carrying at least 15 percent of the vehicle's total gross weight (Code of Maryland Regulations Title 11, Chapter 15 §13-919).

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Maryland, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. Maryland allows 22,400 lbs. on a single axle if the vehicle has a GVW of 73,000 lbs. or less.
  2. Maryland allows several commodity exemptions and tolerances.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by single axle limits and the State's bridge formula, which is adopted from the FBF (Md. Transportation Article Ann. §24-109[b]). See Exhibit 33 for a summary of Maryland's weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 33: Summary of Maryland Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs. (if more than 73,000 lbs. GVW*)
22,400 lbs. (if 73,000 lbs. GVW or less)
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle Per State weight table
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Other n/a
* Any vehicle with a gross maximum weight in excess of 73,000 lbs. may travel only on State highways, except while making a delivery or a pickup and then only when traveling by the shortest available legal route to or from the State highway for the purpose of making such delivery or pickup. In Baltimore City, the shortest available legal route shall be only on designated truck routes.

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Garbage/Refuse: In Anne Arundel County and Baltimore County, garbage and refuse trucks that make collections on a fixed route and are owned by or doing business with any governmental entity in the respective county are permitted rear axle load limit tolerances of 10 percent if the overweight is due to bad weather and the truck does not exceed its registered gross weight limit (Md. Transportation Code Ann. §24-108[c]).

Agricultural Commodities: Except on Interstate highways, a vehicle carrying farm products (including agricultural crop products, livestock, meats, poultry, marine food products, and others) that have been loaded in fields or other off-highway locations is permitted an axle load limit tolerance of 10 percent. A SU vehicle with three axles, or a combination of vehicles with a trailer less than 32 feet long or a semitrailer less than 45 feet long, either carrying such products or registered as a farm, is permitted an axle load limit tolerance of 5 percent. During harvest time, an axle load limit tolerance of 15 percent is permitted for a vehicle carrying the following agricultural products:

  • Wheat, for the period from June 1 to August 15;
  • Corn, for the period from July 1 to December 1;
  • Soybeans, for the period from September 1 to December 31; and
  • Vegetable crops, for the period from June 1 to October 31 (Md. Transportation Code Ann. §24-108[b] and §24-109[f][1]).

Forest Products: Except on Interstate highways, a vehicle carrying forest products that have been loaded in forests or similar off-highway locations is permitted an axle load limit tolerance of 10 percent. A SU vehicle with at least three axles or a combination of vehicles with a trailer length of less than 32 feet carrying such products is permitted an axle load limit tolerance of 10 percent except for the period from June 1 through September 30, when an axle load limit tolerance of 15 percent is permitted. Combinations of vehicles with a semitrailer length of 45 feet or less carrying such products are permitted an axle load limit tolerance of 5 percent, except for the period from June 1 through September 30 when an axle load limit tolerance of 15 percent is permitted (Md. Transportation Code Ann. §24-108[b] and §24-109[f][2]).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

State law has adopted a weight exemption for auxiliary power units or idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight, gross vehicle weight, or bridge formula weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (Md. Transportation Code Ann. §24-109[g]).

Other Exemptions76

Implements of Husbandry: State weight limits do not apply to farm equipment temporarily moved on a highway (Md. Transportation Code Ann. §24-101[a]).

Emergency Vehicles: State weight limits do not apply to emergency vehicles (Md. Transportation Code Ann. §24-101[a]).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The State Highway Administration is authorized to issue single-trip permits for overweight vehicles that specify the maximum weight permitted, the route to be followed, and the time at which the trip is to be made. In exceptional cases, limited duration, multitrip special vehicle permits may be issued to overweight and oversize vehicles, but these are not intended to allow regular and continuous movement.77

The State Highway Administration is also authorized to enter into reciprocal agreements with other jurisdictions in the United States and Canada that provide for issuing permits for non-divisible loads of overweight or oversize vehicles involved in interstate commerce or to enter into regional or national permit agreements pertaining to overweight or oversize vehicles involved in interstate commerce. The State Highway Administration and the Department of State Policy are jointly authorized to formulate rules and regulations relating to the movement of oversize and overweight vehicles (Md. Transportation Code Ann. §24-112 through §24-113.2).

Sealed Containers: If needed, to provide access to the Port of Baltimore for international freight, the State Secretary of Transportation is authorized to adopt regulations concerning the issuance of permits for overweight vehicles that are carrying only manifested international freight in sealed, seagoing containers on a semitrailer. These vehicles are allowed 22,400 lbs. on a single axle, 44,000 lbs. on tandem axles, or 90,000 lbs. GVW. They may only operate on parts of the Interstate and State highway systems that are designated by the Secretary in conjunction with the United States Department of Transportation, or on the shortest practical route, as authorized by the Secretary, from such a designated highway to a truck terminal; port; other point of origin or destination; or (within 1 mile of the designated highway) facilities for food, fuel, repairs, or rest (Md. Transportation Code Ann. §24-113.1).78

Farm Products: The State Highway Administration may issue an exceptional hauling permit for a combination of vehicles that carries only farm products on non-Interstate highways as defined in Md. Agriculture Code Ann. §10-601[c], are loaded in fields or other off-highway locations, and has an axle configuration of not less than six axles and a front-to-rear centerline axle spacing of not less than 50 feet. The permit may allow the vehicle to have the following weight limits: 20,000 lbs. gross weight on a single axle and a maximum GVW of 87,000 lbs., with a tolerance of 1,000 lbs. for GVW and 15 percent for axle weights. The driver must have in possession for each vehicle in the combination a valid North American Standard Driver/Vehicle Level 1 inspection report issued with the preceding 180 days that shows no out-of-service violations. Vehicles in combination may not exceed any tire weight rating or tire speed restriction adopted by regulation under TA, §25-111 (Md. Transportation Code Ann. §24-113.2).

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Maryland State statute.

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Massachusetts

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Massachusetts are found in Mass. Gen. Laws Ann. Ch. 85, §§30 et seq. and Mass. Gen. Laws Ann. ch. 90, §19 through §19L (available on the State's Web site at https://malegislature.gov/Laws/GeneralLaws/PartI/TitleXIV/Chapter85 and https://malegislature.gov/Laws/GeneralLaws/PartI/TitleXIV/Chapter90, respectively).

Additional information about Massachusetts truck weight limits can be found on the Massachusetts Department of Transportation Web site at http://www.massdot.state.ma.us. Also, Massachusetts' permitting procedure and limits are located in Mass. Admin. Code tit. 700, §§8.00 et seq., which can be found at http://www.mass.gov/courts/docs/lawlib/700-799cmr/700cmr8.pdf.

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Massachusetts has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 22,400 lbs. on a single axle, 36,000 lbs. on a tandem axle, and 127,400 lbs. GVW on parts of the Interstate system (the Massachusetts Turnpike). See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

  1. Massachusetts State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles and commodities.
  2. Massachusetts State statute allows tolerances for axle weights and/or GVW.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State axle limits and the State bridge formula, which is adopted from the FBF (Mass. Gen. Laws Ann. Ch. 90, §19A). See Exhibit 34 for a summary of Massachusetts' weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 34: Summary of Massachusetts Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 18,000 lbs. on non-Interstate highways if axles are spaced less than 6 ft. apart
22,400 lbs. on all highways if axles are spaced 6 ft. or more apart
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle Per State weight table
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Other 800 lbs. per inch of tire (Mass. Gen. Laws Ann. ch. 85, §30)

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Construction Materials, Liquid Petroleum, Refuse, and Bulk Feed: Vehicles hauling construction materials, liquid petroleum products, refuse, or bulk feed may exceed State weight limits without a permit, provided that the gross vehicle weight does not exceed the GVW rating established by the original manufacturer of the chassis or the maximum weight for which it is registered. The following vehicles are included in this exemption:

  • A construction type motor vehicle or a motor vehicle designed and used to haul refuse with two axles, up to a GVW of 46,000 lbs.;
  • A motor vehicle carrying bulk feed;
  • A construction type semitrailer or tandem unit or motor vehicle having three axles;
  • A semitrailer unit or motor vehicle having three axles carrying liquid petroleum products; and
  • A motor vehicle with three axles designed and used to haul refuse, with its load weighing not more than 60,000 lbs. (Mass. Gen. Laws Ann. Tit. 90, §19A).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

The Federal weight exemption for idle emission reduction technology for auxiliary power units is granted by enforcement policy in Massachusetts rather than by State law; that is, the exception is not specifically enumerated in the statute. The amount that is allowed under enforcement is 400 lbs.79

Other Exemptions

Snow Plows: The maximum axle weights in Massachusetts do not apply to any vehicle being operated on any public way while performing municipality-, county-, or State-contracted snow clearing duties (Mass. Gen. Laws Ann. ch. 90, §19J).

Highway Construction Vehicles: The maximum vehicle weight in Massachusetts does not apply to any vehicle being operated on a public way within 200 yards of its work site if the vehicle is being used to construct a public way under a contract with the State or a local government (Mass. Gen. Laws Ann. ch. 90, §19I).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

Non-Divisible Loads: The Commissioner of Highways is authorized to issue special permits to non-divisible loads with a GVW exceeding State weight limits as well as the higher limits for standard overweight permits. The duration of these permits cannot exceed 1 year (Mass. Gen. Laws Ann. ch. 85, §30A). Vehicles operating with a special non-divisible load permit may exceed the weight limits set forth by the permit by 5 percent (Mass. Gen. Laws Ann. ch. 90, §19A).

Divisible Loads: The Commissioner of Highways has the authority to issue permits to operate vehicles or vehicle combinations up to the following limits:

  • Three-axle vehicles with a GVW up to 73,000 lbs.;
  • Four-axle vehicles with as GVW up to 87,000 lbs.; and
  • Vehicles with five or more axles with a GVW up to 99,000 lbs. (Mass. Gen. Laws Ann. ch. 85, §30A).

The duration of these permits cannot exceed 1 year. Vehicles operating with a permit may exceed the weight limits set forth by the permit by 5 percent (Mass. Gen. Laws Ann. ch. 90, §19A).

Pup Trailer Permits: These regulations will permit a three-axle truck weighing up to 60,000 lbs., including cargo, to travel in combination with a two-axle trailer, weighting up to 25,000 lbs., including cargo, with the combination length not to exceed 65 feet. The permit allows a combination to operate on State highways and throughways specified in the regulations. The purpose is to allow a more fuel and cost efficient transport of bulky materials, e.g., recyclable materials (Mass. Admin. Code tit. 700, §8.17).

Tandem Unit: A large tandem unit must be registered for the gross weight that it carries and certified by the original manufacturer to carry this weight. The vehicle weight of a large tandem unit may not exceed 127,400 lbs. The maximum gross weight of the tractor and first semitrailer may not exceed 71,000 lbs. The maximum gross weight of each unit of dolly and semitrailer may not exceed 56,400 lbs. (Mass. Admin. Code tit. 700, §7.07).

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: I-90 Massachusetts Turnpike from NY State to Turnpike Exit 18 in Boston.

Turnpike Authority Limits: The Turnpike Authority allows vehicles to operate at or below the following levels. Vehicles operating over these levels on the turnpike require a special permit. A large tandem unit must be registered for the gross weight that it carries and certified by the original manufacturer to carry this weight. The vehicle weight of a large tandem unit may not exceed 127,400 lbs. The maximum gross weight of the tractor and first semitrailer may not exceed 71,000 lbs. The maximum gross weight of each unit of dolly and semitrailer may not exceed 56,400 lbs.

The maximum gross weight that may be carried upon any combination of units is limited by the maximum gross weight that can be carried upon each unit and its axles. The maximum gross weight for the unit of tractor and first semitrailer is governed by this formula: 35,000 lbs. plus 1,000 lbs. per foot between the center of the foremost axle of the tractor and the center of the rearmost axle of the first semitrailer.

The gross load on a unit may not exceed the sum of the allowable axle loads, which are as follows:

  • Maximum gross weight on any one axle: 22,400; and
  • Tandem axles on one vehicle (under ten feet apart) (Axles measuring less than 46 inches between axle centers are considered as one axle): 36,000

The limit of 127,400 lbs. permitted under 700 CMR 7.07(4) requires a minimum axle spacing of 92 feet, measured between the center of the foremost axle of the tractor and the center of the rearmost axle of the rearmost semitrailer. If the axle spacing is less, the permissible gross weight is correspondingly reduced.

Turnpike Authority limits are as follows:

  • Motor Vehicle with two axles: 46,000 lbs.;
  • Vehicle or vehicle combination with three axles: 73,000 lbs.;
  • Vehicle or vehicle combination with four axles: 87,000 lbs.; and
  • Vehicle or vehicle combination with five or more axles: 99,000 lbs.

(Mass. Admin. Code tit. 700, §7.06, §7.07)

[ Return to list of States. ]


Michigan

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Michigan are found in Mich. Comp. Laws Ann. §257.722 (available on the State's Web site at http://www.legislature.mi.gov/(S(3tsnwg55s0rv4xipuawvu145))/mileg.aspx?page=getobject&objectname=mcl-257-722&queryid=1945485&highlight=seasonal+weight).  The Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) also has two documents regarding Michigan's truck size and weight laws:  one for normal operations, available at the DOT Web site at http://mdotcf.state.mi.us/public/webforms/public/T-1.pdf, and a second that provides information on oversize/overweight vehicles, available at http://mdotcf.state.mi.us/public/webforms/public/T-2.pdf.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit and with a gross weight of 80,000 lbs. or less) is governed by State axle limits and the State bridge formula, which is adopted from the FBF (Mich. Comp. Laws Ann. §257.722).  See Exhibit 35 for a summary of Michigan's weight provisions under regular operations.

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Michigan has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 164,000 lbs.80 GVW on the Interstate System provided axle limits are maintained. See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

  1. Michigan State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles and commodities.
  2. Weight laws do not apply to boat lifts operated by a marina or watercraft dealer when moved incidentally on the highway.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit and with a gross weight of 80,000 lbs. or less) is governed by State axle limits and the State bridge formula, which is adopted from the FBF (Mich. Comp. Laws Ann. §257.722). See Exhibit 35 for a summary of Michigan's weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 35: Summary of Michigan Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle* 20,000 lbs. on Interstate highways or other designated highways for vehicles with a GVW of 80,000 lbs. or less
18,000 lbs. on all other highways (spaced 9 ft. or more apart)
9,000 lbs. on all other highways (spaced less than 3 ft. 6 inches)
Tandem Axle** 34,000 lbs. on Interstate highways or other designated highways for vehicles with a GVW of 80,000 lbs. or less
Each axle of a tandem assembly is limited to 13,000 lbs. on all other highways, except in the following cases:
  • One axle may carry up to 16,000 lbs. if there is no other axle within 9 ft. of any axle of the assembly and no other axle in the vehicle combination exceeds 13,000 lbs.
  • Two consecutive tandem axles may carry up to 16,000 lbs. each if there is no other axle within 9 ft. of any axle of the assembly and the vehicle is a truck tractor-semitrailer combination having not more than five axles.
Tridem Axle Per State weight table
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs. or less: application of bridge formula
More than 80,000 lbs., provided axle limits are maintained (up to 164,000 lbs. on 11 axles and appropriate spacing).
Other 700 lbs. per inch of tire tread width
* Seasonal load restrictions reduce the allowable axle limits and maximum wheel load based on pavement type during the months of March, April, and May. State law allows for some exemptions to these seasonal restrictions but only up to the State weight limits that apply under regular operations (Mich. Comp. Laws Ann. §257.722[8]).
** A tandem axle is defined in Mich. Comp. Laws Ann. §257.67 as two axles spaced more than 3 ft. 6 inches and less than 9 feet apart. On a five-axle tandem combination, both tandems are allowed 16,000 lbs. per axle. On any legal combination with more than five axles, only one tandem axle assembly is permitted to have 16,000 lbs. per axle, and other tandem axles in the combination may not exceed 13,000 lbs. per axle.

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Saw Logs: A crib vehicle and semitrailer or trailer designed and operated to transport saw logs may operate with a GVW up to 164,000 lbs. (Mich. Comp. Laws Ann. §257.719[3][b]).

Agricultural Commodities: The maximums for axle loads in regular operations are increased by 10 percent for vehicles transporting farm products81 from the place of harvest or storage to the first point of delivery on a road in Michigan. However, 10 percent axle loading increase does not alter the gross vehicle weight restrictions. This exemption does not apply to Interstate highways (Mich. Comp. Laws Ann. §257.722[13]).

In addition, combinations of vehicles with not more than five axles that are transporting agricultural commodities may have two consecutive tandem axles82 with a maximum weight of 17,000 lbs. on each axle, provided the first and last axles of the two axle groups are spaced no less than 36 feet apart and the GVW does not exceed 80,000 lbs. This provision is for vehicles traveling between the national truck network or a special designated highway and any other highway (Mich. Comp. Laws Ann. §257.722[4]).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

The Federal weight allowance/exemption for idle emission reduction technology allowance for auxiliary power units is granted by enforcement policy in Michigan rather than by State law; that is, the exception is not specifically enumerated in the statute. The amount that is allowed under enforcement is 400 lbs.83

Other Exemptions

Fire Trucks: State weight limits do not apply to fire trucks (Mich. Comp. Laws Ann. §257.716[2]).

Implements of Husbandry: State weight limits do not apply to implements of husbandry (Mich. Comp. Laws Ann. §257.716[2]).

Boat Trailers: State weight limits do not apply to boat lifts or oversized hydraulic boat trailers owned by a marina or a watercraft dealer and used exclusively for commercial boat storage (Mich. Comp. Laws Ann. §257.716[2]).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Michigan Department of Transportation may issue special permits authorizing the operation of vehicles exceeding State weight limits. Such a permit may be issued for a single trip, multiple trips, or on an annual basis and must describe the routes on which the travel will take place (Mich. Comp. Laws Ann. §257.725).

Extended Permits: Specific loads moved frequently on State highway right-of-way may qualify for renewable, extended permits:

  • Construction equipment limited to a maximum of 24,000 lb. per axle and 150,000 GVW;
  • Pavement marking equipment limited to an overload of 20 percent not to exceed 700 lb. inch of tire tread width;
  • Raw forest product up to 90,000 lbs. GVW with specific axle limitations on specific routes between Michigan and Wisconsin only;84 and
  • Rubbish – None.85

Tow Trucks: A wrecker and a disabled vehicle or vehicle combination may exceed State weight limits if a special permit is obtained and it does not operate on any highway or road included on a list provided by the State Department of Transportation, unless the disabled vehicle is located on one of those routes (Mich. Comp. Laws Ann. §257.716[4]).

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: All Interstate routes and designated State highways.

The MDOT maintains a multitiered truck route system and map on its Web site at http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdot/MDOT_2012TruckOperatorMap_414004_7.pdf.

  • Black, green, gold, and purple routes are open to all legal loads with no seasonal limitations. (Green and gold routes are subject to certain dimension limitations.)
  • Red routes are subject to spring load restrictions.

[ Return to list of States. ]


Minnesota

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Minnesota are found in Minnesota Statute §169.80 through 169.88 (available on the State's Web site at https://www.revisor.leg.state.mn.us/statutes/?id=169).

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Minnesota, one provision in State law allows trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits: Minnesota allows a 10 percent increase in weight during seasonal freeze. Vehicles operating under this exemption on non-Interstate highways do not need a permit.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State's tire weight limits, the axle weight limits table, and seasonal weight increases (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.824 to §169.826). See Exhibit 36 for a summary of Minnesota weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 36: Summary of Minnesota Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 10,000 lbs. per single tire
20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle 42,000 lbs.
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Other A 10 percent increase in State over weight limits is allowed during winter freeze on non-Interstate highways without a permit and on Interstate highways with a permit.
600 lbs. per inch width of tire on steering axles
500 lbs. per inch width of tire on all other axles

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

None.

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emissions Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for emissions reduction technology or idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight or gross vehicle weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.824[2][b]).86

Other Exemptions

Fire Trucks: State weight limits do not apply to fire trucks (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.80[e]).

Implements of Husbandry: State weight limits do not apply to implements of husbandry as long as they meet certain safety standards of operation laid out in State law. An implement of husbandry may not be operated or towed on an Interstate highway (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.801).

Winter Increase: State weight limits are increased by 10 percent between the dates set by the Commissioner of Transportation for each zone based on a freezing index model each winter (Minn. Stat. Ann. §196.826 Subd. 1).

Tow Trucks: State weight limits do not apply to a tow trucks or towing vehicles when towing a disabled or damaged vehicle to a place of safekeeping or repair (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.829[2]).

Utility Vehicles: State weight limits do not apply to a utility vehicle that does not exceed 20,000 lbs. per single axle if the vehicle is owned by a public utility; a municipality or municipal utility that operates the vehicle for its municipal electric, gas, or water system; or a cooperative electric association (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.829[3]).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles87

In general, the Commissioner of Transportation is authorized to issue permits for the movement and operation of a vehicle or combination of vehicles in excess of State weight limits. An overweight axle group cost factors table lists the weight limits per axle group that are allowed under these permits. The Commissioner is also authorized to enter into agreements with other States for reciprocal administration and permitting that allows the movement of vehicles of sizes and weights that do not conform to State law, including granting permits by other States to travel on Minnesota highways (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.86[5][e] and §169.86). Additional special permits are detailed below.

Forest Products: Vehicles or combinations of vehicles with six or more axles that are carrying raw or unfinished forest products and have a gross vehicle weight of up to 90,000 lbs. or up to 99,000 lbs. during an authorized winter seasonal increase may be issued an annual permit to operate on non-Interstate highways. Such vehicles may exceed legal axle weight limits by up to 12.5 percent or up to 23.75 percent when seasonal increases are in effect, but may not exceed 20,000 lbs. gross weight on any single axle (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.8261).

Pulpwood Vehicle: Vehicles or combinations of vehicles with six or more axles may operate, on non-Interstate highways, with a gross vehicle weight up to 82,000 lbs. when transporting pole-length pulpwood. Such vehicles must comply with State axle weight limits (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.863).

Paper Products: Two-unit and three-unit vehicle combinations may be issued special paper products vehicle permits. Two-unit combinations may carry loads of up to 90,000 lbs. on six axles or 97,000 lbs. on seven or more axles (99,000 lbs. during seasonal increases). Three-unit combinations may carry up to 108,000 lbs. (seasonal weight increases do not apply). All combinations operating under these permits must comply with State axle and tire weight limits and seasonal load restrictions. They may not be operated on Interstate highways, but may only be operated on these routes:

  • Trunk Highway marked 2 between Grand Rapids and the port of Duluth;
  • Trunk Highway marked 169 between Grand Rapids and its junction with Trunk Highway marked 53;
  • Trunk Highway marked 194 between Trunk Highway marked 2 and Trunk Highway marked 53; and
  • Trunk Highway marked 53 between Virginia and the port of Duluth (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.864).

Farm Products: A road authority is authorized to issue an annual permit for vehicles or vehicle combinations to haul raw or unprocessed agriculture products with the following axle and weight limits:

  • Up to 90,000 lbs. with six axles (99,000 lbs. during a seasonal increase); and
  • Up to 97,000 lbs. with seven or more axles (99,000 lbs. during a seasonal increase).

These vehicles may not travel on Interstate highways (except for sealed intermodal containers as allowed by the Federal Government) and must comply with State axle weight limits and seasonal load restrictions (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.865).

Canola: The Commissioner of Transportation is authorized to issue a special canola-hauling vehicle annual permit for a three-unit combination of vehicles with a gross vehicle weight of up to 105,500 lbs. Such vehicles may only be operated on the following routes:

  • Trunk Highway 175 from Hallock to the North Dakota border;
  • U.S. Highway 75 from Hallock to Donaldson; and
  • Trunk Highway 11 from Donaldson to the North Dakota border.

These vehicles may not travel on Interstate or NN highways and may not take advantage of the seasonal weight increases. They also must comply with State axle and tire weight limits and seasonal load restrictions (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.866).

Livestock: Vehicles or combinations of vehicles with six or more axles may operate on non-Interstate highways with a gross vehicle weight of up to 88,000 lbs. when exclusively engaged in hauling livestock (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.824[2][a][2]).

Milk: Single-unit vehicles hauling milk are allowed a 10 percent weight tolerance, but they may not exceed the manufacturer's GVW rating or other certification of GVW rating that complies with Federal regulations. These vehicles may not travel on Interstate highways, may not take advantage of the seasonal weight increases, and must comply with seasonal load restrictions (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.867).

Harvest Season Permit: State weight limits are increased by 10 percent from the beginning of harvest to November 30 each year for the movement of sugar beets, carrots, and potatoes from the field of harvest to the point of the first unloading. Transferring the product from a farm vehicle or a small farm trailer to another vehicle is not considered to be the first unloading. A permit is required for this increase (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.826[1a]).

Excess Weight Permit: When a 10 percent winter increase is in effect, a permit is required for vehicles or vehicle combinations in excess of 80,000 lbs. gross vehicle weight and 20,000 lbs. single axle weight while traveling on Interstate highways (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.826[3]).

Seasonal Permit for Haulers: The Commissioner may issue special permits annually to any hauler allowing the hauler to move vehicles or vehicle combinations with weights exceeding State weight limits by up to 10 percent on Interstate highways during specified times and within approved zones (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.86[1a]).

Routes

Some special permits issued by the Commissioner of Transportation have route limits that are specified in State law (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.864 and §169.866). In particular, vehicle combinations with special paper products vehicle permits may only operate on the following:

  • Trunk Highway marked 2 between Grand Rapids and the port of Duluth;
  • Trunk Highway marked 169 between Grand Rapids and its junction with Trunk Highway marked 53;
  • Trunk Highway marked 194 between Trunk Highway marked 2 and Trunk Highway marked 53; and
  • Trunk Highway marked 53 between Virginia and the port of Duluth.

Also, vehicle combinations with special canola-hauling vehicle annual permits may only operate on the following:

  • Trunk Highway 175 from Hallock to the North Dakota border;
  • U.S. Highway 75 from Hallock to Donaldson; and
  • Trunk Highway 11 from Donaldson to the North Dakota border.

Although several exemptions exclude Interstate highways, vehicles with special canola-hauling vehicle annual permits also may not travel on NN highways.

[ Return to list of States. ]


Mississippi

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Mississippi are found in Miss. Code Ann. §§63-5-1 et seq. (available via LexisNexis at http://www.lexisnexis.com/hottopics/mscode/). Additional information about Mississippi truck weight limits can be found on the Mississippi Department of Transportation's Web site at http://mdot.ms.gov/portal/home.aspx.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Mississippi, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. Mississippi allows several axle and GVW exemptions for specific commodities.
  2. Vehicles designed or adapted to be used exclusively to prepare and load chemicals or other materials for aerial application to crops are exempt from size, weight, and load limitations.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by State axle limits and the State's total combined weight tables. Mississippi statute contains three weight tables, all of which are subject to the wheel and axle load limits, and each table applies to a different set of highways designated by the Mississippi Transportation Commission (Miss. Code. Ann. §63-5-27 to §63-5-33). See Exhibit 37 for a summary of Mississippi's weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 37: Summary of Mississippi Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle Per State weight table
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Other 550 lbs. per inch width of tire
* Any axle spaced less than 8 feet and 1 inch from any other axle, measured between the centers of the nearest axles, is considered as part of an axle group.

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Agricultural Chemicals: State weight limits do not apply to vehicles used exclusively to prepare or load chemicals for aerial application to agricultural crops. Travel must be during daylight hours, within 50 miles of the point of origin and only on non-Interstate highways (Miss. Code Ann. §63-5-9[g]).

Concrete Products: Specialized vehicles for transporting concrete products do not have to conform to the axle spacing requirements, axle/tire loadings, or total combined weights, provided that such vehicles do not exceed a GVW of 60,000 lbs., have at least three axles, and are operated within 50 miles of their home base on non-Interstate routes (Miss. Code Ann. §63-5-27[4][a]).

Cotton: Specialized vehicles for transporting raw cotton from harvest to the cotton gin do not have to conform to axle spacing or axle or tire loadings, provided they are less than 60,000 lbs. GVW and only operated within a 50 mile radius of their home base or contractual customer on non-Interstate routes (Miss. Code Ann. §63-5-27[4][b]).

Solid Waste: Specialized vehicles for transporting solid waste do not have to conform to axle spacing or tire loadings, provided they are less than 60,000 lbs. GVW and only operate within a 50-mile radius of their home base or contractual customer on non-Interstate routes (Miss. Code Ann. §63-5-27[4][c]).

Log Loaders: The rear axle of trailer-mounted, knuckle-boom log loaders is exempt from the tire loading limits, provided the gross weight of the axle does not exceed 41,000 lbs. (Miss. Code Ann. §63-5-27[4][d]).

Agricultural Products: Vehicles transporting agricultural products are allowed a tandem axle weight of 40,000 lbs. Vehicles operating without a harvest permit are allowed a 5 percent tolerance above GVW, tandem, or axle weights, up to a GVW of 81,600 lbs. (including a 2 percent tolerance). Vehicles operating with a harvest permit are allowed a 5 percent tolerance above GVW and all axle weights up to a GVW of 84,000 lbs. To qualify for these tolerances, a vehicle must be transporting one of the listed products, must travel on non-Interstate highways, and must operate within a 100-mile radius (except where the products are being transported for processing within the State). The axle or gross weight tolerance is not allowed where scales are available at the loading point of origin (Miss. Code Ann. §63-5-33[3]).

Timber Products: Vehicles transporting wood chips, wood shavings, and/or sawdust are allowed a tandem axle weight of 40,000 lbs. Vehicles operating without a harvest permit are allowed a 5 percent tolerance above GVW, tandem or axle weights, up to a GVW of 81,600 lbs. (including a 2 percent tolerance). Vehicles operating with a harvest permit are allowed a 5 percent tolerance above GVW and all axle weights up to a GVW of 84,000 lbs. To qualify for these tolerances, a vehicle must be transporting one of the listed products, must travel on non-Interstate highways, and must operate within a 100-mile radius (except where the products are being transported for processing within the State). The axle or gross weight tolerance is not allowed where scales are available at the loading point of origin (Miss. Code Ann. §63-5-33[3]).

Aggregate: Vehicles transporting sand, gravel, fill dirt, highway construction products, and recycling products are allowed a tandem axle weight of 40,000 lbs. Vehicles operating without a harvest permit are allowed a 5 percent tolerance above GVW, tandem or axle weights, up to a GVW of 81,600 lbs. (including a 2 percent tolerance). Vehicles operating with a harvest permit are allowed a 5 percent tolerance above GVW and all axle weights up to a GVW of 84,000 lbs. To qualify for these tolerances, a vehicle must be transporting one of the listed products, must travel on non-Interstate highways, and must operate within a 100-mile radius (except where the products are being transported for processing within the State). The axle or gross weight tolerance is not allowed where scales are available at the loading point of origin (Miss. Code Ann. §63-5-33[3]).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

The Federal weight allowance for idle emission reduction technology allowance for auxiliary power units is granted by enforcement policy in Mississippi rather than by State law; that is, the exception is not specifically enumerated in the statute. The amount that is allowed under enforcement is 400 lbs.88

Other Exemptions

Fire Trucks: State weight limits do not apply to fire trucks (Miss. Code Ann. §63-5-9[a]).

Road Machinery: State weight limits do not apply to road machinery (Miss. Code Ann. §63-5-9[b]).

Various Construction Equipment: State weight limits do not apply to rubber-tire vehicles used for construction, for warehousing, or for transportation of equipment or materials if the vehicles are not primarily designed to operate on a roadway and are only operated adjacent to the site where they are being used (Miss. Code Ann. §63-5-9[f]).

Non-divisible Loads: Vehicles hauling non-divisible or containerized prepackaged products unloaded at a State port or to be loaded at a State port are allowed a gross weight of 40,000 lbs. on any tandem and a tolerance not to exceed 5 percent above their authorized gross, tandem, or axle weight. The allowable maximum weight of any such vehicle is 81,600 lbs. (including a 2 percent tolerance). These exceptions only apply to non-Interstate highways (Miss. Code Ann. §63-5-33[4]).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Mississippi Transportation Commission is authorized to issue special permits for the movement of a vehicle or combination of vehicles in excess of State weight limits. Each permit may be issued for single-trip, multitrip, or continuous operation (Miss. Code Ann. §63-5-51[1]).

Heavy Equipment: A vehicle hauling a non-divisible load of heavy equipment with a GVW of 150,000 lbs. or less is eligible to be permitted by the Department of Transportation. The permits last 1 year after the beginning movement date and must contain specified routes for travel (Miss. Code Ann. §63-5-52).

Harvest Permits: Vehicles for which harvest permits have been issued89 are allowed gross vehicle weights of 84,000 lbs., or 4,000 lbs. over what the vehicle can legally carry based on number of axles and spacing, not to exceed 84,000 lbs., on non-Interstate highways. However, governing authorities of counties and municipalities may designate the routes under their respective jurisdictions on which these vehicles may travel. An approved route designation provided to a specific permit holder is valid for 6 months from its date of issue. The provisions regarding harvest permits are set to sunset on July 1, 201390 (Miss. Code Ann. §63-5-33[5]).

Commodities to or from Mississippi River Terminals and Port Facilities: Trucks transporting commodities to or from terminal or port facilities on the Mississippi River may be operated in excess of size or weight limits specified in law, except when exceeding Federal limitations would affect the State's Federal aid, or if the load exceeds limits then in force in any State immediately adjacent to the county in which the port or terminal facilities are located, provided the movement is wholly within a county with a bridge across the Mississippi River, the operation of loads exceeding gross weight limits must be issued a permit by the Mississippi Department of Transportation. The permit must specify the roads, highways, or streets within such county over which such vehicle or vehicles may be operated and indicate that the load is for commodities that have been received at a port facility by water transportation and are destined for delivery across the bridge or that the load is moving across the bridge to be shipped from a water port (Miss. Code Ann. §63-5-47).

Routes

State statute provides three total combined weight tables, each for a different category of highways to be designated by the Mississippi Transportation Commission (Miss. Code Ann. §63-5-29 to §63-5-33). The Mississippi Transportation Commission is tasked with taking economic factors involving agriculture and industry into consideration and allowing the increased load limits where practical or necessary. State law also explicitly names two specific routes as eligible for these higher limits:

  • Mississippi Highway 32 from its intersection with U.S. Highway 49 at Webb, Tallahatchie County, eastward to Charleston; and
  • Mississippi Highway 492 from its intersection with Mississippi Highway 21 eastward to its intersection with Mississippi Highway 15 (Miss. Code Ann. §63-5-35).

Certain motor vehicles registered with the State Tax Commission on or before April 24, 1974, shall be considered as having an additional 12 feet of spacing while traveling on Interstate highways. This provision applies to vehicles with spacing between the extreme axles of greater than 29 feet but less than 40 feet with a GVW not exceeding 72,000 lbs. on four axles or a GVW not exceeding 73,280 lbs. on five axles (Miss. Code Ann. §63-5-34).

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Missouri

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Missouri are found in Mo. Ann. Stat. §304.170 to §304.260 (available on the State's Web site at http://www.moga.mo.gov/mostatutes/stathtml/30400001701.html). A summary of State regulations can also be found on the Missouri Department of Transportation Office of Motor Carrier Services Web site at http://www.modot.org/mcs/index.htm.

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Missouri has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 120,000 lbs. GVW when entering the State from Kansas and 90,000 lbs. GVW when entering from Oklahoma, including parts of the Interstate System. See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Missouri, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. On highways other than the Interstate Highway System, vehicles may exceed single axle, tandem axle, and gross weight limitations by up to 2,000 lbs. However, total gross weight cannot exceed 80,000 lbs., except in the case of other specific exemptions.
  2. Missouri State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles and commodities.
  3. In commercial zones, the single axle load limit is increased up to 22,400 lbs.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State axle limits and the State maximum load table (Mo. Ann. Stat. §340.180). See Exhibit 38 provides a summary of Missouri's weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 38: Summary of Missouri Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle Per State weight table
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Other 2,000 lbs. tolerance on non-Interstate highways
12,000 lbs. steering axle

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Milk: Vehicles hauling milk from a farm to a processing facility, provided they do not violate limits of the State bridge table, are allowed a total gross weight not to exceed 85,500 lbs. This exemption does not apply to Interstate highways (Mo. Ann. Stat. §340.180[10]).

Solid Waste Haulers: Any truck, tractortrailer, or other combination engaged in transporting solid waste between any city and a solid waste disposal area or solid waste processing facility may operate with a weight not to exceed 22,400 lbs. on one axle or 44,800 lbs. on any tandem axle. This exemption does not apply to Interstate highways (Mo. Ann. Stat. §304.184).

Livestock: Any vehicle or vehicle combination that is hauling livestock is allowed a gross weight of up to 85,500 lbs. on specific routes (see Routes, below), none of which may be Interstate highways (Mo. Ann. Stat. §304.180[9]).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight and gross vehicle weight, is up to 400 lbs.91 or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (Mo. Ann. Stat. §304.180[8]).

Other Exemptions

Fire Trucks: State weight limits do not apply to fire trucks used by a fire department, a fire protection district, a volunteer fire protection association, or when being operated for the purpose of sale, demonstration, exhibit, or delivery to those entities (Mo. Ann. Stat. §304.172).

Tow Trucks: State weight limits do not apply to any wrecker or tow truck performing a wrecking or towing service. If a disabled or wrecked vehicle cannot be moved by a wrecker or a tow truck, a rollback or car carrier may be used without regard to State height, width, weight, length, and load restrictions, if it is a bona fide wrecker operator or owner (Mo. Ann. Stat. §304.174).

Commercial Zone Operations: Missouri State law provides a weight exception for vehicles operating exclusively within the corporate limits of a city with 75,000 or more inhabitants; within 2 miles of the city's corporate limits; or within a city's "commercial zone," which is calculated based on a city's population. Vehicles may operate in these areas with a weight of up to 22,400 lbs. on a single axle (Mo. Ann. Stat. §304.190).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The chief engineer of the Missouri Department of Transportation is authorized to issue special permits for overweight loads. Permits may be issued for a single trip or for a definite time period. The State Highway and Transportation Commission is authorized to prescribe rules and regulations relating to issuing permits (Mo. Ann. Stat. §304.200).

The Missouri Department of Transportation is authorized to issue overweight and/or oversized92 single-trip special permits good for a definite time period for non-divisible loads and some farm products. (Mo. Rev. Stat. Chapter 304 §200).

Concrete Pump/Well Drilling: A special permit may be issued for the operation of any concrete pump or well drillers' equipment. Such a permit may be issued for single use or on an annual basis (Mo. Ann. Stat. §304.180[7]). In addition, State regulations allow for issuing a blanket permit for well-drilling rigs that permits up to 40,000 lbs. on a tandem axle and 60,000 lbs. on a tridem axle group (Mo. Admin. Code tit. 7, §10-25.020[6][D][2]).

Routine Overweight Permits: The Missouri Department of Transportation has established regulations applying to non-divisible loads allowed under special trip permits. All load movements under routine overweight permits are limited to specified routes on the State highway system. State regulations specify the axle configuration and maximum load allowances for vehicles having from five axles up to 12 axles (Mo. Admin. Code tit. 7, §10-25.020[11]).

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: The higher grandfathered weights are allowed on all NN routes, including Interstate highways, within a 20-mile band of the Kansas and Oklahoma borders.

Livestock: Any vehicle hauling livestock may operate at a GVW up to 85,500 lbs. while traveling on the following routes:

  • U.S. Highway 36 from St. Joseph to U.S. Highway 63;
  • U.S. Highway 65 from the Iowa State line to U.S. Highway 36;
  • U.S. Highway 63 from the Iowa State line to U.S. Highway 36; and
  • U.S. Highway 63 from U.S. Highway 36 to Missouri Route 17.

This exemption does not apply to Interstate highways (Mo. Ann. Stat. §304.180[9]).

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Montana

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Montana are found in Mont. Code Ann. §§16-10-101 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://leg.mt.gov/bills/mca_toc/61.htm). Administrative rules for Overweight Permit requirements can be found at http://www.mtrules.org/gateway/ChapterHome.asp?Chapter=18%2E8. Additional information about Montana truck weight limits can be found on the MDT Motor Carrier Web site at http://www.mdt.mt.gov/business/mcs/.

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Montana has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 137,800 lbs. GVW on parts of the Interstate System, provided that axle limits per the FBF are maintained. See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Montana, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits.

  1. Farm vehicles transporting agricultural products on non-Interstate highways within 100 miles of the harvested field may exceed State weight limits by up to 20 percent on each axle and have a tire load of up to 670 lbs. per inch width.
  2. Vehicles operating in Montana under a Memorandum of Understanding between Montana and Alberta, Canada. A tractor with two trailing units that uses "B-Train" connections between units is allowed up to 137,800 lbs. on eight axles. These vehicles are limited to I-15 between the Canadian Border and Shelby, Montana.
  3. A vehicle traveling on U.S. highway 93 from the border between Canada and the United States to 10 miles south of the border is subject to the specific maximum allowable gross weight limit provided in rules adopted by the department but is not subject to maximum gross weight limits determined by the State's bridge formula.93

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State axle limits and the State bridge formula, which is adopted from the FBF (Mont. Code Ann. §61-10-107). See Exhibit 39 for a summary of Montana's weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 39: Summary of Montana Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle Per State weight table
Gross Weight 131,060 lbs. provided that any vehicle carrying a divisible load over 80,000 lbs. must comply with the FBF
137,800 lbs. for vehicles operating the Montana/Alberta Memorandum of Understanding**
Other 500 lbs. per inch of tire width on non-steering axles 61-10-107(2)(a)†
* Axles 40 inches or less apart are considered single axles (Mont. Code Ann. §61-10-107).
** Montana statute does not have an explicit, overall GVW limit. However, State law specifies that the maximum gross weight allowed on a vehicle may not exceed the weight limits adopted by the Department of Justice and requires those limits to conform with Federal regulations in 23 CFR 658, Appendix C, for vehicles operating in Montana (Mont. Code Ann. §61-10-107[1][a]). Similarly, State law does not permit vehicles to operate on Interstate highways (without a permit) in excess of the maximum weight permitted by Federal law and regulation (Mont. Code Ann. §61-10-110]). This table reflects the Federal limits.
† 23 CFR§658 Appendix C states 600 lb. per in. of tire width. However, Mont. Code Title 61, Chapter 10§107 states 500 lbs.

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Agricultural Products: A farm vehicle transporting agricultural products on non-Interstate highways within 100 miles of the harvested field to the point of first unloading may exceed State weight limits by up to 20 percent on each axle and have a tire load of up to 670 lbs. per inch width (Mont. Code Ann. §61-10-144).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

The Federal weight exemption for idle emission reduction technology for auxiliary power units is granted by enforcement policy in Montana rather than by State law; that is, the exception is not specifically enumerated in the statute. The amount that is allowed under enforcement is 400 lbs.94

Other Exemptions

Montana/Alberta MOU: Vehicles operating in Montana under a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Montana and Alberta, Canada, are allowed to operate tractors with two trailing units that use "B-Train" connections between units up to 137,800 lbs. GVW on eight axles. See the Routes section for where these vehicles are allowed to operate.

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Montana Department of Transportation is authorized to issue special permits to operate vehicles with loads exceeding State axle and gross vehicle limits. Such permits may be issued in writing or over the telephone and must contain the routes on which the travel will take place and specify whether the permit is for a single trip or continuous operation. State law permits the department to enter into a contract with a private party to act as the Department's agent for the purpose of issuing special permits (Mont. Code Ann. §61-10-121).

The Department of Transportation may enter into interstate agreements to issue permits for overweight vehicles, as authorized by the laws and rules of each State (Mont. Code Ann. §61-10-113).

Divisible Loads: The Department of Transportation may issue permits for the movement of vehicles with divisible loads exceeding State weight limits (Mont. Code Ann. §61-10-121).

Governmental Vehicles: Montana will issue permits to vehicles owned by Federal, State, or local governments and political subdivisions without a fee (Mont. Code Ann. §61-10-144).

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: For vehicles with a cargo-carrying length between 88 and 93 feet, the grandfathered limits apply to all routes on the interstate system in Montana. For vehicles with a cargo-carrying length less than 88 feet, the grandfathered limits apply to all NN routes (including the interstates) except for U.S.-87 from milepost 79.3 to milepost 82.5.

Montana/Alberta MOU: Higher weight vehicles under this MOU are limited to I-15 between the Canadian border and Shelby, Montana.

U.S. Highway 93: Vehicles traveling on U.S. Highway 93 from the United States' border with Canada to 10 miles south of the border are not subject to the GVW limits set by the State bridge formula. The Department of Justice shall adopt rules to specify the GVW limits for such vehicles (Mont. Code Ann. §61-10-107[1][b]).

Montana maintains slightly different regulations for Interstate and Non-Interstate highway networks. See 23 CFR, part 658 Appendix C. For specific weight restrictions, see http://www.mdt.mt.gov/travinfo/restrictions.shtml.

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Nebraska

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Nebraska are found in Neb. Rev. Stat. §§60-6,288 et seq. to §§60-6,305 (available on the State's Web site at http://nebraskalegislature.gov/laws/browse-chapters.php?chapter=60). Additional information about Nebraska truck weight limits can be found in the "Nebraska Truck Information Guide," provided by the Carrier Enforcement Division of the Nebraska State Patrol at http://www.transportation.nebraska.gov/rpt/pdfs/netruckguide.pdf.

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Nebraska has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 95,000 lbs. GVW on parts of the Interstate System. See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

  1. Livestock haulers are allowed to exceed the single axle, tandem axle, or axle group limit when an overload is caused by the shifting weight of livestock, provided the vehicle does not exceed the maximum GVW.
  2. Nebraska State statute allows for several tolerances for axle weights and/or GVW for various types of commodities and vehicles.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State axle limits and the State gross weight table (Neb. Rev. Stat. §60-6,294).

Exhibit 40 provides a summary of Nebraska's weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 40: Summary of Nebraska Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle Per State weight table
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs. on Interstate highways*
95,000 lbs. on non-Interstate highways
Other n/a
* Not explicitly stated but implied by statutes Neb. Rev. Stat. §60—6,295 and §60—6,294[5].

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Agricultural Floater-Spreaders: Self-propelled equipment designed to carry and apply fertilizer, chemicals, or related products to agricultural soil and crops is considered an agricultural floater-spreader. Any such vehicle with a gross laden weight of 48,000 lbs. or less is not subject to State axle limits or the gross weight table while traveling on non-Interstate highways (Neb. Rev. Stat. §60-6,294.01).

Livestock Haulers: Trucks hauling livestock are allowed to exceed State weight limits on only one axle, only one tandem axle, or only one group of axles,95 if the single axle, tandem axle, or group of axles is caused by a shifting of the weight of the livestock and the GVW is within the State maximum. This exemption applies only to non-Interstate highways (Neb. Rev. Stat. §60-6,301[2]).

Grain/Seasonal Harvest Products: Grain or seasonal harvest products may be hauled from the field to storage, market, or stockpile in the field or from stockpile to market or factory, up to 70 miles with a load that exceeds State weight limits by 15 percent on any tandem axle, group of axles, and GVW. Vehicles with only a single rear axle may move the same with 15 percent excess on any single axle and GVW. This exemption applies only to non-Interstate highways (Neb. Rev. Stat. §60-6,301[5]).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight and gross vehicle weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (Neb. Rev. Stat. §60-6,294[13]).

Other Exemptions

Tow Trucks: State weight limits do not apply to a disabled vehicle or combination of vehicles while being moved by a tow truck or a wrecker to a place of secure safekeeping, repair, or storage (Neb. Rev. Stat. §60-6,297).

Snow/Ice: An arresting or enforcing officer has the discretion to issue only a warning if a vehicle exceeds State weight limits by 5 percent or less, if they believe the excess weight is caused by snow, ice, or rain (Neb. Rev. Stat. §60-6,301).

Specialized Mobile Equipment: State weight limits do not apply to self-propelled specialized mobile equipment with a fixed load, up to a gross weight of 94,000 lbs. if the equipment has four axles or 72,000 lbs. if it has three axles. This exemption does not apply to Interstate highways (Neb. Rev. Stat. §60-6,294[10]).

Construction/Agricultural Equipment: No permit is required for the temporary movement on highways (other than dustless-surfaced State highways) and for necessary access to points on such highways during daylight hours of cost-saving equipment to be used in highway or other public construction or in agricultural land treatment when such temporary movement is necessary and for a reasonable distance (Neb. Rev. Stat. §60-6,298[1][b]).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Department of Roads or the Nebraska State Patrol, with respect to highways under their jurisdictions, including Interstate highways, are authorized to issue a special, continuing, or continuous permit for the operation or movement of a vehicle with a non-divisible load that exceeds State weight limits when such a permit is necessary in one of the following cases:

  • To further the national defense or the general welfare;
  • To permit movement of cost-saving equipment to be used in highway or other public construction or in agricultural land treatment; or
  • Because of an emergency, an unusual circumstance, or a very special situation.

Such permits shall State the maximum axle weights and GVW allowed under the permit. The Department of Roads may adopt rules and regulations for overweight permits (Neb. Rev. Stat. §60-6,298).

Refuse: With a permit issued by the Department of Roads or the Nebraska State Patrol, trucks with a compactor used exclusively to collect and transport garbage may exceed State weight limits by up to 20 percent on only one axle, only one tandem axle, or only one group of axles when the vehicle is laden with garbage or refuse if the vehicle is within the maximum gross load. Permits can be issued for 1 or more months up to 1 year. This exemption applies only to non-Interstate highways (Neb. Rev. Stat. §60-6,301[3]).

Grain/Seasonal Harvest Products: The Department of Roads or the Nebraska State Patrol, with respect to highways under their jurisdictions, including Interstate highways, may issue a special, continuing, or continuous permit authorizing the operation of vehicles that haul grain or seasonally harvested products from the field to storage, market, or stockpile in the field, or from stockpile to market or factory, with a load that exceeds State weight limits by up to 15 percent. Such vehicles are limited to operating for a distance of up to 120 miles or, for longer combination vehicles, up to 70 miles. This distance limitation may be waived for vehicles carrying dry beans that must be transported more than 120 miles from the field where harvested to reach an available marketing or storage destination. Loads moving under permit cannot exceed 20,000 lbs. on any single axle (Neb. Rev. Stat. §60-6,298[a][ii]).

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: For vehicles with lengths between 65 and 71.5 feet, the grandfather provisions apply to all non-interstate NN routes. For vehicles with lengths greater than 71.5 feet, the grandfather provisions apply only to I-80 between Wyoming and Exit 440.

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Nevada

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Nevada are found in Nev. Rev. Stat. §484D.600 through §484D.740 (available on the State's Web site at http://www.leg.state.nv.us/Division/Legal/LawLibrary/NRS/NRS-484D.html#NRS484DSec600).

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Nevada has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 129,000 lbs. GVW on parts of the Interstate System. See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Nevada, one provision in State law allows trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits: Nevada State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various vehicle types and commodities.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operation is governed by State axle limits and the State bridge formula, which is adopted from the FBF (Nev. Rev. Stat. §484D.635). See Exhibit 41 for a summary of Nevada's weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 41: Summary of Nevada Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle Per State weight table
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs. on Interstate highways*
Governed by State bridge formula on non-Interstate highways
Other 600 lbs. per inch of tire width on steering axles
500 lbs. per inch of tire width on all other axles
*State law does not explicitly set a maximum GVW limit. It does, however, require that no State weight limits may be applied in ways that prevent Nevada from receiving Federal funds under 23 U.S.C. §127 (Nev. Rev. Stat. §484D.660[1]). Because a State is subject to a loss of Federal funding if its laws establish weight limits on the Interstate Highway System that differ from Federal standards, the Federal limit of 80,000 lbs. may be assumed for Interstate highways.

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Garbage/Refuse/Recycling: A vehicle used by a licensed hauler of garbage, refuse, or recycling is allowed 22,000 lbs. on a single axle and 40,000 lbs. on a tandem axle on any non-Interstate highway (Nev. Rev. Stat. §484D.640).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

The Federal weight exemption for idle emission reduction technology for auxiliary power units is granted by enforcement policy in Nevada rather than by State law; that is, the exception is not specifically enumerated in the statute. The amount that is allowed under enforcement is 400 lbs.96

Other Exemptions

Fire Trucks: All fire trucks temporarily moved upon a highway are exempt from State weight limits (Nev. Rev. Stat. §484D.600[3][a]).

Highway Machinery: All highway machinery temporarily moved upon a highway is exempt from State weight limits (Nev. Rev. Stat. §484D.600[3][a]).

Snow Plows: All snow plows temporarily moved upon a highway are exempt from State weight limits (Nev. Rev. Stat. §484D.600[3][a]).

Farm Tractors/Implements of Husbandry: Farm tractors and other implements of husbandry temporarily moved upon a highway other than an Interstate highway or a controlled access highway are exempt from State weight limits (Nev. Rev. Stat. §484D.600[3][b]).

Traction Engines/Tractors: Traction engines or tractors propelled by a movable track are exempt from State weight limits (Nev. Rev. Stat. §484D.670[1]).97

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Nevada Department of Transportation is authorized to issue special permits for the movement of vehicles and vehicle combinations in excess of State weight limits (Nev. Rev. Stat. §484D.685). These permits may be for a single trip, for continuous use, or for multiple trips over a limited time and must specify the routes on which travel will take place (Nev. Rev. Stat. §484D.730). No vehicle operated under the conditions of a continuous or multiple trip, time-limited permit may exceed 20,000 lbs. on any single axle (Nev. Rev. Stat. §484D.735).

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: All NN Routes (including the Interstate system) except for U.S.-93 from Nevada State Route 500 to Arizona.

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New Hampshire

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of New Hampshire are found in N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266:9 through §266:26. (available on the State's Web site at http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/xxi/266/266-mrg.htm).

See "Regulations and Instructions Governing Oversize and Overweight Vehicle Permits" for additional info on legal and permitted regulations/descriptions at: http://wideloadshipping.com/dot-regulations/oversizevehiclemanual.pdf.

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

New Hampshire has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 U.S.C. §127) to allow vehicles to operate up to 22,400 lbs. on a single axle, 36,000 lbs. on a tandem axle, and 99,000 lbs. GVW on parts of the Interstate system. See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in New Hampshire, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. New Hampshire allows the following weight limits in excess of Federal limits on non-interstate highways:
    1. Single-axle limit of 22,400 lbs.
    2. Tandem-axle limit of 36,000 lbs.
    3. Tridem-axle limit of 54,000 lbs.
    4. Gross vehicle weight limit of 99,000 lbs.
  2. New Hampshire allows a 5 percent tolerance above GVW limits and axle limits on non-Interstate and General Highway System up to 80,000 lbs. GVW and a 10 percent tolerance above axle weight limits for vehicles with additional registration.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by State axle limits and the State bridge formula, which is adopted from the FBF (N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266:18 and §266:18-a). See Exhibit 42 for a summary of New Hampshire's weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 42: Summary of New Hampshire Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs. on Interstate highways when GVW is greater than 73,280 lbs.
22,400 lbs. on Interstate and non-Interstate highways when GVW is 73,280 lbs. or less (for three-axle single-unit vehicles and all other vehicles with axles 10 ft. or more apart)
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs. on Interstate highways when GVW is greater than 73,280 lbs.
36,000 lbs. on Interstate and non-Interstate highways when GVW is 73,280 lbs. or less
Tridem Axle Per State weight table
Gross Weight 80,000; 99,000 on non-Interstate highways*
Other 5 percent tolerance on non-Interstate highways, up to a maximum GVW of 80,000 lbs.
* Vehicles exceeding the limits under N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266-18-a (with a GVW limit of 80,000) are required to gain additional certification from the Commissioner of the Department of Safety. This qualifies a vehicle to drive on any non-Interstate highway in accordance with the limits in N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266-18-b with a GVW of up to 99,000 lbs. The application is good for 1 year and includes a fee and requires proof of the vehicle's safety and ability to haul the higher loads (N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266-18-d).

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

None

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for auxiliary power units or idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight, gross vehicle weight, or bridge formula weight, is up to 400 lbs.98 or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266:18-c[VII]) (N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266-18-c[VII]).

Other Exemptions

Fire Trucks: Any type of emergency fire fighting vehicle is exempt from State weight limits (N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266:19-a).

Highway Surfacing Vehicles: Any vehicle used exclusively to surface highways is not subject to State weight limits, provided that two-axle vehicles may not carry more than 2,000 gallons, and three-axle vehicles may not carry more than 4,000 gallons of tar, asphalt, or a combination of the two (N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266:18-c).

Construction Equipment: Construction equipment and motor vehicles used in the construction or maintenance of highways are exempt from State weight limits, provided that such equipment is used within a highway construction zone or extensions thereof as prescribed by the Commissioner of the Department of Transportation (N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266:20).

Winter Highway Maintenance Vehicles: Any construction equipment and motor vehicles used for the winter maintenance of ways that are owned, leased, or rented by the State or any political subdivision of the State are exempt from State weight limits (N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266:21).

Tow Trucks: State weight limits do not apply to damaged, disabled, or abandoned vehicles being towed by a tow truck for a reasonable distance to the nearest safe haven off the highway where the weight of each such individual unit does not exceed the maximum legal or permitted weight for the unit (N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266:21-a).

Implements of Husbandry: Implements of husbandry are allowed to exceed State weight limits without obtaining a permit (N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266:24[II]).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Commissioner of Transportation is authorized to issue permits for the movement of vehicles with overweight divisible and non-divisible loads. Such permits shall specify the time and route for travel (N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266:24).

Multijurisdictional Regional Permit: State law authorizes the Commissioner of Transportation to enter into a multijurisdictional regional truck permit compact for the movement of oversize and overweight non-divisible loads (N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266:24-b).

Certification: The Commissioner of the Department of Safety may certify vehicles to exceed the State weight limits and operate at alternative higher weight limits. Certifications last for 1 year, are valid for one power unit and one trailer, and permit overweight travel on non-Interstate highways only. Such certified vehicles will be allowed reciprocity if New Hampshire has entered into any agreements with other States (N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266.18-d).

Vehicles certified by the Commissioner may operate at the following axle weight limits:

  • 22,400 lbs. per axle on a three-axle SU vehicle;
  • 20,000 lbs. per axle on a four-axle SU vehicle;
  • 22,400 lbs. per axle on all other vehicles with axles ten feet or more apart;
  • 18,000 lbs. per axle spaced less than 10 feet apart, except on three- and four-axle SU vehicles;
  • 36,000 lbs. on a tandem axle for truck tractor-semitrailer combinations with four or more axles; or
  • 54,000 lbs. on a tridem axle for truck tractor-semitrailer combinations with four or more axles.

And the following gross vehicle weight limits:

  • 37,400 lbs. for a two-axle vehicle;
  • 65,000 lbs. for a three-axle SU vehicle;
  • 73,000 lbs. for a four-axle SU vehicle; or
  • 99,000 lbs. for truck tractor-semitrailer or truck tractor-trailer combinations pursuant to axle spacing.

(N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266:18-b)

Tolerances on Non-Interstate and General Highway System for Vehicles with Additional Registration: Any police officer shall allow certified vehicles a tolerance of 5 percent above their respective State weight limits and 10 percent above their respective axle limits (N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266:18-b).

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: For as long as Federal exemptions in 23 U.S.C. §127 allow maximum gross weights of up to 99,000 lbs. on Interstates 89, 93, and 95, vehicles traveling on those highways (except for those sections posted for lower weights) may operate under the higher weight limits for non-Interstate highways. Those vehicles must pay a fee for additional registration permitting the vehicles to operate at higher weight limits (N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266:18[III]).

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New Jersey

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of New Jersey are found in N.J. Stat. Ann. §§39:3-84 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://law.onecle.com/new-jersey/39-motor-vehicles-and-traffic-regulation/3-84.html).

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in New Jersey, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. New Jersey allows a single axle up to 22,400 lbs. under normal operation.
  2. New Jersey State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles and commodities.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State axle limits and the State's table of maximum gross weights (N.J. Stat. Ann. §39:3-84[b]). See Exhibit 43 for a summary of New Jersey weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 43: Summary of New Jersey Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs. on Interstate highways
22,400 lbs. on non-Interstate highways
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle n/a
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Other 5 percent weight tolerance*
* This tolerance applies to axle and gross weight limits, provided the load does not exceed the State maximum gross weight of 80,000 lbs. (N.J. Stat. Ann. §39:3-84.3[f]).

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

None.

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

The Federal weight exemption for idle emission reduction technology for auxiliary power units is granted by enforcement policy in New Jersey rather than by State law; that is, the exception is not specifically enumerated in the statute. The amount that is allowed under enforcement is 400 lbs.99

Other Exemptions

Tow Trucks: State weight limits do not apply to vehicles or combinations of vehicles that are disabled and being removed from a highway in the State, provided that the vehicle combination does not travel more than 75 miles on public highways from where the disablement occurred. In addition, a heavy-duty tow truck is permitted, in combination with the towed unit or units, to exceed the axle, dimensional, and maximum gross weight limits for tow trucks and towed unit combinations, except that the limit may not exceed 150,000 lbs. gross combined weight (N.J. Stat. Ann. §39:3-84[c]).

Construction/Solid Waste Vehicles: Constructor or solid waste vehicles (including vehicle combinations where such vehicles are the drawing vehicles) are exempt from State axle weight limits on non-Interstate highways and exempt from State GVW limits if operated within 30 miles from the point established as a headquarters for the particular construction operation. Vehicles registered as "constructor" or "solid waste" or a combination of those vehicles shall be limited to a maximum gross vehicle weight, including load or contents, as shown on the registration certificate of that vehicle (N.J. Stat. Ann. §39:3-84.1[a]). In addition, the Commissioner of Transportation is authorized to adopt rules and regulations providing for exemptions from State weight limits for vehicles or vehicle combinations registered as "solid waste" haulers and providing for any time limits, distinctions among classes of vehicles, or other conditions with respect to these exemptions (N.J. Stat. Ann. §39:3-84.1[b]).

Exemption Rulemaking Authority: The Commissioner of Transportation is authorized to adopt rules and regulations providing for exemptions from State weight limits for vehicles that do not exceed 73,280 lbs. and providing for any time limits, distinctions among classes of vehicles, or other conditions with respect to these exemptions (N.J. Stat. Ann. §39:3-84.1[b]).

Additional Exemption Rulemaking Authority: In addition to any exemptions provided for by regulations adopted pursuant to Subsection B (described immediately above) of this section, the Commissioner of Transportation is authorized to adopt rules and regulations providing for exemptions from State weight limits for a "transitional period"100 for the following:

  • Tandem-axle dump trucks
  • Five-axle dump trailers
  • Two-axle dump trucks
  • Tri-axle dump trucks
  • Four-axle dump trucks
  • Three-axle and four-axle ready-mix transit trucks
  • Four-axle and five-axle flatbed tractor trailers
  • Five-axle bulk carriers
  • Two-axle, three-axle, four-axle, and five-axle liquid bulk carriers
  • Two-axle and three-axle emergency equipment wreckers
  • Solid waste rear-end loaders
  • Solid waste front-end loaders
  • Solid waste four-axle roll-offs
  • Four-axle and five-axle waste transfer tractor trailers
  • Two-axle, three-axle, four-axle, and five-axle general freight carriers
  • Intermodal ocean containers.

(N.J. Stat. Ann. §39:3-84.1[c])

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Chief Administrator of the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission is authorized to promulgate rules and regulations for issuing a special written permit authorizing an applicant to operate or move a vehicle, vehicle combination, or special mobile equipment that is transporting one-piece loads and that cannot be dismembered, dismantled, or divided to comply with the State's weight limits (N.J. Stat. Ann. §39:3-84[d]).101

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in New Jersey State statute.102

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New Mexico

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of New Mexico are found in N.M. Stat. Ann. §§66-7-401 (available on the State's Web site at http://public.nmcompcomm.us/nmpublic/gateway.dll/?f=templates&fn=default.htm).

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

New Mexico has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 21,600 lbs. on a single axle, 34,200 lbs. on a tandem axle, and 86,400 lbs. GVW on the Interstate System. See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in New Mexico, one provision in State law allows trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits: New Mexico State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State's bridge formula and State axle limits. Exhibit 44 provides a summary of New Mexico weight provisions under regular operations (N.M. Stat. Ann. §66-7-409 and §66-7-410).

Exhibit 44: Summary of New Mexico Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 21,600 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,200 lbs.
Tridem Axle Per State weight table
Gross Weight 86,400 lbs.
Other 600 lbs. per inch width of tire 11,000 lbs. per wheel

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

None.

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to total gross vehicle weight with load limitations, is 400 lbs. (N.M. Stat. Ann. §66-7-410[D]).

Other Exemptions

Fire Trucks: State weight limits do not apply to fire trucks (N.M. Stat. Ann. §66-7-401).

Road Machinery: State weight limits do not apply to road machinery while constructing highways (N.M. Stat. Ann. §66-7-401).

Implements of Husbandry: State weight limits do not apply to implements of husbandry (N.M. Stat. Ann. §66-7-401).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

General Overweight Permits: The Department of Public Safety may issue a special permit authorizing the movement of a vehicle with weight exceeding the State weight limits. The permits are issued for a single trip or for 1 year, in the case of emergency, and may allow GVW up to 140,000 lbs. Vehicles with loads up to 96,000 lbs. and operating within 6 miles of the Mexico border are not required to demonstrate that the load is non-divisible. Permits may be issued for the movement of manufactured homes however State law imposes further restrictions on such permits (N.M. Stat. Ann. §66-7-413). Any vehicles with a gross vehicle weight in excess of 170,000 lbs. shall require a special permit. An engineering review must be carried out in order for such a permit to be issued (N.M. Stat. Ann. §66-7-413.2).

Liquid Tank Vehicles: The Motor Transportation Division of the Department of Public Safety may issue special permits authorizing an increase of up to 25 percent in axle weight for liquid hauling tank vehicles. Such permit shall be issued if a liquid hauling tank vehicle would have to haul less than a full tank under the maximum State weights limits. A special permit under this section may be issued for a single trip or for a year, is not valid on Interstate highways, and shall not permit weights in excess of 86,400 lbs. (N.M. Stat. Ann. §66-7-413.4).

Agricultural Products: A multiple trip special permit may be issued for an agriculture product transport vehicle. This permit allows a GVW increase of 5,000 lbs. over the State limits and does not authorize travel on Interstate highways (N.M. Stat. Ann. §66-7-413.7).

Implements of Husbandry: The Motor Transportation Division may issue special permits at all ports of entry to all implements of husbandry, including vehicles hauling implements of husbandry, when using the highways in New Mexico (N.M. Stat. Ann. §66-7-412). No permit is needed for implements of husbandry for movement up to 50 miles on highways connecting or running through farms (N.M. Stat. Ann. §66-7-414).

Oilfield Equipment: A multiple trip special permit may be issued for an oilfield equipment transport vehicle. This permit allows a GVW of up to 140,000 lbs. and does not authorize travel on Interstate highways (N.M. Stat. Ann. §66-7-413.6).

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: The grandfather provision in New Mexico applies to all Interstate highways in the State.

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New York

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of New York are found in N.Y. Vehicle and Traffic Laws §385 and §386 (available on the State's Web site at http://public.leginfo.state.ny.us/lawsseaf.cgi?querytype=laws+&querydata=@plvat0t3a10+&list=law+&browser=browser+&token=51495488+&target=view).

Several resources regarding State regulations for truck size and weight are also available on the NYSDOT Web site at https://www.dot.ny.gov/nypermits/compliance.

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

New York has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 143,000 lbs. GVW on parts of the Interstate System. See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in New York, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. New York allows 22,400 lbs. on a single axle in regular operation.
  2. New York allows 36,000 lbs. on a tandem axle in regular operation.
  3. New York State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles and commodities.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State axle limits and the State bridge formula, which is adopted from the FBF. Vehicles with a GVW under 71,000 lbs. may use the State bridge formula or an alternative equation of 34,000 lbs. plus 1,000 lbs. for each foot of distance between the extreme axles, and vehicles with GVW greater than 71,000 lbs. must use the bridge formula (N.Y. Vehicles and Traffic Law §385[5] through [10)). Exhibit 45 provides a summary of New York weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 45: Summary of New York Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs. on Interstate highways*
22,400 lbs. on non-Interstate highways
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs. on Interstate highways*
36,000 lbs. on non-Interstate highways
Tridem Axle Per FBF
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Other 800 lbs. per inch of tire width
11,200 lbs. per wheel
*State law does not explicitly State these limits. It does, however, require that no State weight limits may be applied in ways that prevent New York from receiving Federal funds (N.Y. Vehicles and Traffic Law §385[20]). Because a State is subject to a loss of Federal funding if its laws establish weight limits on the Interstate Highway System that differ from Federal standards, the Federal limits of 20,000 lbs. on a single axle and 34,000 lbs. on a tandem may be assumed for Interstate highways.
** Axles less than 46 inches apart are counted as one axle (N.Y. Vehicles and Traffic Law §385[5]).

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

None

Emission Reduction / Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for auxiliary power units or idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight, gross vehicle weight, or bridge formula weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (N.Y. Vehicles and Traffic Law §385[10-a]).

Other Exemptions

Snow Plows: The following weight limits apply to any State or municipally owned single vehicle engaged in snow and ice control operations on non-Interstate public highways:

  • The total weight on a single axle may not be more than 32,000 lbs.
  • The total weight on tandem axles may not be more than 42,000 lbs.
  • The total weight on a two axle vehicle may not be more than 52,000 lbs.
  • The total weight on a three axle vehicle may not be more than 62,000 lbs.

(N.Y. Vehicles and Traffic Law §385[17-a])

Fire Trucks: The following weight limits apply to any fire vehicle on non-Interstate public highways:

  • The total weight on a single axle may not be more than 32,000 lbs.
  • The total weight on tandem axles may not be more than 42,000 lbs.
  • The total weight on a two axle vehicle may not be more than 52,000 lbs.

(N.Y. Vehicles and Traffic Law §385[17-b])

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Commissioner of Transportation and the Department of Transportation are authorized to issue permits for the movement of overweight vehicles. These permits are not valid on any State or other highway within any city not wholly included within one county. The New York Department of Transportation is authorized to promulgate rules and regulations concerning overweight permits (N.Y. Vehicle and Traffic Law §385[15][a] and [b]).

No permit may be issued to a combination of vehicles involving more than two vehicles except three vehicle combinations consisting of a tractor, a semitrailer and a trailer, or a tractor and two trailers. Every permit may designate the route to be traveled. No permit may be issued to divisible loads unless specifically allowed in statute (N.Y. Vehicle and Traffic Law §385[15][d]).

Divisible Loads: The Department of Transportation may issue annual permits for divisible overweight loads. Vehicles traveling on State or other highways within any city not wholly included within one county must obtain a permit from that city's Department of Transportation (N.Y. Vehicle and Traffic Law §385[15][f]).103

Seasonal Agriculture Permits: The Department of Transportation is authorized to issue seasonal agriculture permits valid for consecutive months to vehicles registered in New York prior to January 1, 1968, or a vehicle replacing such a vehicle. Vehicles operating under the International Registration Plan must designate New York or another valid jurisdiction as their base State to obtain such a permit. Such permits may be issued to vehicles with up to seven or more axles and allow a GVW up to 117,000 lbs. In addition, a two-axle vehicle with at least 10 feet of spacing may exceed the State GVW limit by 25 percent (N.Y. Vehicle and Traffic Law §385[15][f][i] through [iii]).

Special Permit for Certain Counties

Garbage Truck: A semi-van vehicle may be issued a permit to operate on any highway or bridge at a weight limit determined by the permit (N.Y. Vehicle and Traffic Law §385[15][g]).

Bulk Milk Permit: New York State statute authorizes bulk milk to be considered a non-divisible load (N.Y. Vehicles and Traffic Law §385[15][d]). The New York State Department of Transportation will issue a permit for bulk milk allowing up to 125 percent of normal weight limits, provided the vehicle does not exceed dimensional limits (N.Y. Admin. Code tit. 17, s. 154-1.20).

Power Unit Permit: NYSDOT will issue a permit that allows vehicles with power units registered in New York State to exceed normal weight limits, provided the vehicle does not exceed dimensional limits.104

City DOT Authorization: A city Department of Transportation is authorized to issue permits for the movement of overweight vehicles on any State or other highway within its city limits (N.Y. Vehicle and Traffic Law §385[15][c]).

Non-Divisible Loads: The New York State Department of Transportation also issues a variety of permits for non-divisible loads, including building moves, farm vehicles, mobile cranes, roadwork vehicles, and other loads that cannot be dismantled without affecting the physical integrity of the load. The NYSDOT and the New York State Thruway Authority are also authorized to enter into a cooperative agreement relative to permits to operate or move vehicles or combinations of vehicles the weights or the dimensions of which exceed the limitations along the thruway system and State highway system and select other routes. Below is a non-exhaustive listing of several non-divisible load permits that NYSDOT DOT issues (N.Y. Vehicle and Traffic Law §385[15][a] through §385[16]):

Radial Air Distance Permits: The New York State Department of Transportation issues several types of radial distance permits for non-divisible loads. One permit provides higher GVWs that vary by the vehicle configuration for contractors and trucking companies operating within a 25-mile air radius of a specific construction project. The NYSDOT also issues 50-mile and 100-mile air radius permits that allow GVW up to 135 percent of normal GVW limits. These permits allow movements of specified vehicles or loads for a specified period of time within 50 miles or 100 air miles of the municipality were the business is located (N.Y. Vehicle and Traffic Law §385[15][a] through §385[16]).

Blanket Permits: The New York State Department of Transportation will issue a blanket permit to certain types of businesses allowing them to exceed axle and GVW limits up to 125 percent of normal limits. Blanket permits can be issued for a period of 1 month up to 1 year. Emergency blank permits can also be issued to meet emergency conditions that allow axle and GVW limits higher than normal for several vehicle configurations (N.Y. Vehicle and Traffic Law §385[15][a] through §385[16]).

Sealed Containerized Loads:105 The New York State Department of Transportation will issue non-divisible load permits for sealed containerized load in a freight container as defined by the International Standards Organization (ISO). Sealed containers can exceed legal GVW limits up to 125 percent or a maximum GVW of 100,000 lbs. (N.Y. Vehicle and Traffic Law §385[15][a] through §385[16]).

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: All routes are on New York Thruway I-87 from Bronx/Westchester County line to Thruway Exit 24; I-90 from PA to Thruway Exit 24; I-90 from Thruway Exit B1 to MA; I-190 from Thruway Exit 53 to the Canadian Border; NY-912M (Berkshire Connection of Thruway) from Thruway Exit 21A to Thruway Exit B1.

NY Thruway Access: Various access routes to the New York Thruway are exempted from State weight limits with the Thruway limits then being imposed. The Thruway allows vehicle combinations to operate up to 143,000 lbs. GVW provided that vehicles maintain the axle weights and spacings. Section 15a authorizes NYSDOT and the NY Thruway Authority to enter into a cooperative agreement relative to permits to operate overweight vehicles along the Thruway system, the State highway system, and Routes 5 and 49 between the relocated thruway interchanges, including the Edic Road interchange and River Road near Edic road near the city of Utica.

Permits issued hereunder may be of a joint or reciprocal type for operations or movements on such highway systems and shall not be limited to loads proposed as one piece or item or otherwise cannot be separated into units of less weight.

Section 16 exempts several routes from State weight limits altogether, provided they comply with the weight limits on the NY Thruway. The routes that this exemption applies to are as follows:106

  • Within a radius of 1,500 feet of any New York State thruway toll booth at Fultonville, New York
  • Within a radius of 2,000 feet of any exit or entrance designated B-3 to the New York State thruway, Berkshire section, at New York State route 22
  • Over a route extending north and south on New York State route 332 between New York State thruway exit no. 44 and its intersection with Collett road, and east and west on Collett road between said intersection and no. 6070 Collett road, a distance of approximately 0.8 miles
  • Within a radius of 1.2 miles from New York State thruway toll booth no. 56 on access road to be built between such toll booth no. 56 and the present eastern terminus of route 179 at South Park avenue, over route 179 and old Mile Strip road to the truck terminal entrance on old Mile Strip road at a point approximately 2,430 feet southeast of the intersection of old Mile Strip road and Route 5 as measured along old Mile Strip road, or across Lake Avenue at the northern end of the truck terminal
  • Within a distance of 1.5 miles measured along that portion of the River Road, New York State touring route 266, also known as State highway 129, lying generally northerly of the South Grand Island Bridges, such distance to be measured from the point where the southernmost access road to New York State thruway station no. 17 intersects with said River Road
  • Within a distance of 2 miles measured along New York State Route 400, such distance to be measured from the point where said Route 400 intersects with the New York State thruway, and .5 miles measured along New York State Route 277, such distance to be measured in a northerly direction from the point where New York State Route 277 intersects with New York State Route 400
  • Within a distance of 0.8 miles measured along Walden Avenue in the Town of Cheektowaga, such distance to be measured in a westerly direction from the point where said Walden Avenue intersects with the New York State thruway, 0.5 miles measured along said Walden Avenue, such distance to be measured in an easterly direction from the point where said Walden Avenue intersects with the New York State thruway, 1,640 feet measured along a roadway purchased by the Town of Cheektowaga from Sorrento Cheese, Inc., such distance to be measured in a southerly direction from the point where said roadway intersects with Walden Avenue, and 0.9 miles measured along New York State Route 240, such distance to be measured in a southerly direction from the point where New York State Route 240 intersects with said Walden Avenue
  • Within a distance of 0.1 miles measured along Sheridan Drive, New York State Route 324, such distance to be measured in an easterly direction from the point where said Sheridan Drive intersects with New York State thruway interchange N-15, and 0.4 miles measured along Kenmore Avenue, such distance to be measured in a southerly direction from the point where Sheridan Drive intersects with said Kenmore Avenue
  • Within a distance of 0.8 miles measured along Dingens Street in the city of Buffalo, such distance to be measured in a westerly direction from the Ogden Street exit of the Niagara section of the New York State thruway
  • Within a distance of 0.25 miles along South Street in the city of Buffalo between Hamburg street and Louisiana Street
  • Within a distance of 0.7 miles measured along Louisiana Street in the city of Buffalo, such distance to be measured in a southerly direction from the Louisiana Street entrance of the Niagara section of the New York State thruway
  • Within a distance of 1,700 feet measured along that portion of the River Road, New York State touring Route 266, also known as State Highway 129, lying generally southerly of the South Grand Island Bridges, such distance to be measured from the point where the southernmost access road to New York State thruway station no. 17 intersects with said River Road
  • Within a distance of 0.6 miles extending north along New York State Route 233 from a point where such Route 233 intersects with the exit or entrance designated number 32 of the New York State thruway at Westmoreland in Oneida county
  • Within a route from the thruway toll booth at the New York State thruway exit 21-B and along the access road to Route 9-W, and thence 1,500 feet along route 9-W to be measured in a northerly direction from the point where such thruway access road intersects route 9-W
  • Within a distance of 0.8 miles from exit B-1 of the New York State thruway Berkshire Spur, such distance to be measured in a northerly direction from the point where State route 9 intersects the southernmost access ramp leading to the New York State thruway
  • Within a distance of 1.6 miles from the exit B-1 of the New York State thruway Berkshire Spur, with such distance being measured in a northerly direction from the point where State Route 9 intersects the southernmost access ramp leading to the New York State thruway, upon a determination by the Commissioner of Transportation that the vehicle or combination of vehicles could operate safely upon such Route and that no applicable Federal law, regulation, or other requirement prohibits the operation of such vehicle or combination of vehicles on such route
  • Within a distance of 0.45 miles measured along James E. Casey Drive in the city of Buffalo such distance to be measured in a northerly direction from Dingens Street
  • Within approximately 1 mile of the thruway toll booth at the New York State thruway exit 23 in a northerly direction along Interstate route 787 to the first 'Port of Albany' exit, and right on Church Street south approximately ½ mile to the south end of the Mobil terminal facility and return from Church Street entering Interstate Route 787 in a southerly direction to interchange 23 of the New York State thruway
  • On any route designated by the Commissioner of Transportation within a radius of 6,600 feet of any exit or entrance designated interchange 26 of the New York State thruway, where the Commissioner of Transportation determines that the vehicle or combination of vehicles could operate safely along the designated route and that no applicable Federal law, regulation, or other requirement prohibits the operation of such vehicle or combination of vehicles on such route
  • Over a route extending east and west across New York State Route 414 from the New York State thruway exit 41 to the terminus of the exit 41 on and off ramps for a distance of approximately 100 feet across Route 414 and within approximately 0.1 miles of the on and off ramp of exit 41 of the New York State thruway (Nothing contained in this provision shall be construed to permit these vehicles or combination of vehicles to turn on to Route 414 or to travel along Route 414.)
  • Within a distance of 325 feet, measured along Stew Leonard drive in the city of Yonkers, such distance to be measured in a west-east direction from the point where Stew Leonard Drive intersects with the southbound off-ramp and the northbound on-ramp of interchange 6A of the New York State thruway
  • Over a route extending south on New York State Route 332 between New York State thruway exit number 44 and its intersection with Gateway Drive and west on Gateway Drive to its intersection with Plastermill Road and east on Plastermill Road to its intersection with Loomis Road and east on Loomis road between said intersection and no. 5923 Loomis road, a distance of approximately 1.6 miles, and west on Loomis road between 5923 Loomis road and its intersection with New York State Route 332 and thence north on New York State Route 332 to New York State thruway exit number 44, a distance of approximately 1.1 miles, where the Commissioner of Transportation determines that the vehicle or combination of vehicles could operate safely along the designated route and that no applicable Federal law, regulation, or other requirement prohibits the operation of such vehicle or combination of vehicles on such route.
  • Over a route extending north and on New York State Route 77 between New York State thruway exit number 48-a and the overpass of the New York State thruway, and south on New York State Route 77, a distance of approximately 0.5 miles, where the Commissioner of Transportation determines that the vehicle or combination of vehicles could operate safely along the designated route and that no applicable Federal law, regulation, or other requirement prohibits the operation of such vehicle or combination of vehicles on such route (N.Y. Vehicle and Traffic Law §385[15][a) through §385[16]).

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North Carolina

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of North Carolina are found in N.C. Gen. Stat. §§20-115 et seq. available on the State's Web site at http://www.ncleg.net/gascripts/Statutes/StatutesTOC.pl?Chapter=0020).

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in North Carolina, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. North Carolina allows 38,000 lbs. on a tandem axle in regular operations.
  2. A 10 percent tolerance to State limits is permitted; however, the tolerance does not apply to single axle, tandem axle, or GVW limits.
  3. North Carolina allows a variety of commodity-specific weight exemptions.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operation is governed by the State's axle limits and the weight table found in N.C. Gen. Stat §20-118[b]. See Exhibit 46 for a summary of North Carolina weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 46: Summary of North Carolina Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 38,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle Per State weight table
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Other A 10 percent tolerance is allowed for axle group limits in the State weight chart*
* This tolerance does not apply to single axle, tandem axle, or GVW limits. This does not apply to a vehicle exceeding posted bridge weight limitations or vehicles operating on the Interstate highways (N.C. Gen. Stat. §20-118[h]).

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Refuse-hauling Vehicles: Vehicles designed specifically for collecting, compacting, and hauling garbage are allowed a single axle weight not to exceed 23,500 lbs. on the steering axle on vehicles equipped with a boom or on the rear axle on vehicles loaded from the rear, on non-Interstate highways (N.C. Gen. Stat. §20-118[c][10]).

Various Commodities: Vehicles transporting the following commodities107 within 150 miles of the point of origination are exempt from State weight limitations on non-Interstate highways up to 22,000 lbs. on a single axle, up to 42,000 lbs. on a tandem axle, and up to 90,000 lbs. GVW; up to 26,000 lbs. on a single axle and 44,000 lbs. on a tandem axle for a vehicle with five or more axles and an overall wheelbase of at least 48 inches and 11 inches between the center of axle one and axle two; or up to 27,000 lbs. on a single axle and up to 37,000 lbs. GVW on a two-axle vehicle with at least a 14-inch wheelbase:

  • Agriculture crop products transported from a farm to a processing plant or market;
  • Water, fertilizer, pesticides, seeds, fuel, or animal waste transported to or from a farm;
  • Meats, livestock, or live poultry transported from the farm where they were raised to a processing plant or market;
  • Forest products originating and transported from a farm or woodlands to market with delay interruption or delay for further packaging or processing after initiating transport;
  • Wood residuals, including wood chips, sawdust, mulch, or tree bark from any site;
  • Raw logs to market; or
  • Trees grown as Christmas trees from field, farm, stand, or grove to a processing point.

(N.C. Gen. Stat. §20-118[c][12])

Aggregate: Vehicles hauling aggregates from a distribution yard108 to a destination in another State adjacent to that county are exempt from State weight limits on non-Interstate highways, provided that the vehicle does not exceed 69,850 lbs. gross vehicle weight and 53,850 lbs. per axle grouping for tri-axle109 vehicles. Any tolerances to State weight limits do not apply in this case (N.C. Gen. Stat. §20-118[c][14]).

Soil, Sand, Etc.: Vehicles transporting bulk soil, bulk rock, sand, sand rock, or asphalt millings from a site that does not have a certified scale for weighing the vehicle are exempt from weight limits on non-Interstate highways, provided that the vehicle does not exceed 4,000 lbs. above State maximum GVW, more than 22,000 lbs. on a single axle, or more than 42,000 lbs. on a tandem axle (N.C. Gen. Stat. §20-118[c][15]).

Concrete: Vehicles hauling unhardened ready-mixed concrete are exempt from State weight limits on non-Interstate highways, provided that the vehicle has a single steer axle weight 22,000 lbs. or less, a tandem axle weight of 46,000 lbs. or less, and does not exceed GVW of 66,000 lbs. for a three axle vehicle and/or 72,600 lbs. on a four axle vehicle. Any tolerances to State weight limits do not apply in this case (N.C. Gen. Stat. §20-118[c][16]).

Cotton: A vehicle equipped with a self-loading bed and designed exclusively to transport compressed seed cotton from the farm to a cotton gin, or sage to market, may operate on non-Interstate highways with a tandem-axle weight up to 50,000 lbs. (N.C. Gen. Stat. §20-118[k]).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

None.

Other Exemptions110

Tow Trucks: A wrecker may tow any disabled truck or other motor vehicle or combination of vehicles to a place for repairs, parking, or storage within 50 miles from the point that the vehicle was disabled without being in violation of State weight limits (N.C. Gen. Stat. §20-118[c][7]).

Fire Trucks: Fire-fighting vehicles owned by a municipal or rural fire department are exempt from State weight limitations on non-Interstate highways (N.C. Gen. Stat. §20-118[c][13]). In addition, any vehicle owned and operated by State or local government or a Federal agency, while actively engaged in fire-fighting or an emergency, is permitted a GVW of 90,000 lbs., a tri-axle weight of 50,000 lbs., and a tandem axle weight of 22,000 lbs. (N.C. Gen. Stat. §20-118.4[a]).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Department of Transportation may issue a special permit authorizing the applicant to operate or move a vehicle exceeding State weight limits on any highway under its jurisdiction for up to 1 year. In addition, the authorities in any incorporated city or town may grant permits authorizing the applicant to move a vehicle over the streets of such city or town in excess of State limits (N.C. Gen. Stat. §20-119[a]).

Firefighting: Annual or single-trip permits, waiving the State weight limits, may be issued to commercial vehicles actively engaged in response to a fire or emergency (N.C. Gen. Stat. §20-118.4[d]).

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in North Carolina State statute.

[ Return to list of States. ]


North Dakota

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of North Dakota are found in N.D. Cent. Code §§39-12-01 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://www.legis.nd.gov/cencode/t39c12.pdf?20140606064552).

Additional information about truck size and weight laws in North Dakota can be found in a Size and Weight Guide and truck route maps available on the North Dakota State Patrol Web site at http://www.nd.gov/ndhp/motor-carrier/legal-vehicle-size-and-weight.

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

North Dakota has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 105,500 lbs. GVW on the Interstate System. See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in North Dakota, provisions in State law do allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits off the Interstate Highway System: North Dakota State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles and commodities.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the FBF on Interstate highways and, on non-Interstate highways, the FBF plus other State limits (N.D. Cent. Code §39-12-05 and §39-12-05.3). See Exhibit 47 for a summary of North Dakota's weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 47: Summary of North Dakota Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle* 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle** 17,000 lbs. per axle within a tandem on Interstate highways
19,000 lbs. per axle within a tandem on non-Interstate highways
34,000 lbs. total on all highways
Tridem Axle Determined by FBF on Interstate highways
48,000 lbs. on non-Interstate highways
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs. on Interstate highways
105,500 lbs. on non-Interstate highways
Other 550 lbs. per inch of tire width (does not apply to steering axles)
10,000 lbs. per tire
*Axles spaced 40 inches apart or less are considered one axle. Axles spaced 8 feet apart or over are considered individual axles.
**Axles spaced more than 40 inches apart but less than 8 feet apart may not carry a gross weight in excess of 17,000 lbs. on Interstate highways and 19,000 lbs. per axle on non-Interstate highways, with a maximum of 34,000 lbs. on a tandem on all highways.

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Livestock: Vehicles carrying livestock are exempt from the limitations relating to the carrying capacity of any wheel, tire, axle, or group of axles when excessive weight is caused by a shifting of the weight of the livestock (N.D. Cent. Code §39-12-22).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law provides for State and local authorities to establish the limits for weight and loads for highways under their jurisdiction (N.D. Cent. Code §39-12-01). The North Dakota State Highway Patrol has posted a guide on its Web site (North Dakota Vehicle Legal Size and Weight Guide: NDHP Motor Carrier Operations, Ref: 9-1 (10/07)) that adopts a weight exemption for auxiliary power units or idle reduction technology units consistent with the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight, GVF gross vehicle weight, or bridge formula weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less.

Other Exemptions 111

Approved Exemptions: The Director of the Department of Transportation and the State Highway Patrol are authorized to approve exemptions to the State weight limits on non-Interstate highways. The exempted vehicle shall not exceed a GVW of 105,500 lbs. and must be issued an annual permit (N.D. Cent. Code §39-12-05.3[3]).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The State highway patrol is authorized to issue permits for the operation of vehicles that exceed State weight limits. Each permit may designate the route to be traveled and any other restrictions deemed necessary. A multitrip permit may be issued for non-divisible loads up to 150,000 lbs. and is subject to higher fees.112 State law also authorizes the State Highway Patrol and local authorities to adopt rules to govern the movement of oversize and overweight vehicles (N.D. Cent. Code §39-12-02). The State Highway Patrol and the Department of Transportation are also authorized to enter into cooperative regional permit agreements that authorize any participating State to issue regional permits for the movement of non-divisible overweight or oversize vehicles from one State in the region to or through other States in the region under a single-trip permit. Such permits must conform with State permitting requirements and weight limits (N.D. Cent. Code §39-12-24).113

Ten Percent Tolerance: The Director of the Department of Transportation is authorized to issue permits to vehicles carrying agricultural products from the field of harvest to the point of initial storage site, hauling potatoes or sugar beets, or transporting solid waste from July 15 to December 1 and for the general movement of products from December 1 to March 7. Such permits allow the vehicles to exceed State weight limits for non-Interstate highways by 10 percent, provided the permitted vehicles do not exceed the GVW limit of 105,500 lbs. (N.D. Cent. Code §39-12-05.3[4] and [5]).

Fertilizer or Chemical Applicators: On non-Interstate highways, the GVW limit of 105,500 lbs. does not apply to self-propelled fertilizer spreaders or self-propelled chemical applicators when the weight of a single axle does not exceed 22,000 lbs. and the weight per inch width of tire does not exceed 550 lbs. The State Highway Patrol must issue seasonal permits for the commercial movement of these exempted vehicles (N.D. Cent. Code §39-12-05.3[6]).

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: The Federal grandfather provision applies to all routes on the NN, including Interstate highways. However, North Dakota State statute restricts GVW on the Interstate highways to 80,000 lbs. under regular operations, meaning the Federal exemption of 105,500 lbs. GVW is allowed on all NN routes except Interstate highways (I-94 and I-29). However, a single-trip permit can be purchased to run up to 105,500 lbs. on Interstate highways (23 CFR 658 Appendix C).

North Dakota publishes a map depicting its weight limits. The map can be found and downloaded at http://www.dot.nd.gov/divisions/maintenance/docs/9-1annex_d.pdf.

[ Return to list of States. ]


Ohio

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Ohio are found in Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §§5577.01 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/5577).

Additional information about Ohio truck weight limits can be found on the Ohio DOT and State patrol Web site at http://www.dot.state.oh.us and http://statepatrol.ohio.gov/doc/truckbook.pdf.

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Ohio has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 21,000 lbs. on a single axle and either 115,000 lbs. or 127,400 lbs. GVW on parts of the Interstate System (Ohio Turnpike).114 See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Ohio, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. Ohio State statute allows for 7.5 percent tolerances above State axle weight and/or GVW limits for various commodities.
  2. Ohio State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State's bridge formula, which is adopted from the FBF, for travel on Interstate highways. For travel on non-Interstate highways, State law contains limits for single, tandem, and tridem axles in combination with base weights, with weight increases being based on spacing. Exhibit 48 provides a summary of Ohio weight provisions under regular operations (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §5577.04).

Exhibit 48: Summary of Ohio Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs. on Interstate highways
34,000 lbs. plus 1000 lbs. per foot greater than 4 feet;* at 8 feet the effective weight limit would be 38,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle FBF on Interstate highways
48,000 lbs. on non-Interstate highways**
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Other 650 lbs. per inch width of tire
* Limited to 40,000 lbs., which would be at ten feet of spacing (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §5577.04[D][2][b]). ** GVW may not exceed 38,000 lbs. plus 900 lbs. per foot greater than 9 feet of spacing between the front and rearmost axle of the vehicle. Alternatively, if part of a six-axle vehicle has at least 20 feet of spacing and a GVW of 54,000 lbs. plus 600 lbs. per additional foot of spacing, such a vehicle is allowed (Ohio Rev. Stat. Ann. §5577.04[D][3]).

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Coal Transportation: A coal truck transporting coal, from the place of production to the first point of delivery where the title to the coal is transferred and on non-Interstate highways, may exceed the State's GVW and axle weight limits by 7.5 percent (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §5577.042).

Farm Vehicles: A farm truck or farm machinery transporting farm commodities, from the place of production to the first point of delivery where the commodities are weighed and title to the commodities is transferred and on non-Interstate highways, may exceed the State's GVW and axle weight limits by 7.5 percent, except during the months of February and March (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §5577.042).

Logging Vehicles: A log truck transporting timber, from the site of its cutting to the first point of delivery where the timber is transferred and on non-Interstate highways, may exceed the State's GVW and axle weight limits by 7.5 percent, except during the months of February and March (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §5577.042).

Solid Waste: A solid waste haul vehicle hauling solid waste, from the place of production to the first point of delivery where the solid waste is disposed of or title to the solid waste is transferred and on non-Interstate highways, may exceed the State's GVW and axle weight limits by 7.5 percent (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §5577.042).

Surface Mining Truck: A surface mining truck transporting minerals, to a construction site or a place of processing or a place where the title is transferred and on non-Interstate highways, may exceed the State's GVW and axle weight limits by 7.5 percent (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §5577.043).

Hot Mix Asphalt: A vehicle transporting hot mix asphalt to a paving site and on non-Interstate highways may exceed the State's GVW and axle weight limits by 7.5 percent (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §5577.043).

Concrete: A vehicle transporting concrete to a discharge site and on non-Interstate highways may exceed the State's GVW and axle weight limits by 7.5 percent (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §5577.043).

Manure, Turf, and Sod: A vehicle transporting manure, turf, or sod to a place of delivery and on non-Interstate highways may exceed the State's GVW and axle weight limits by 7.5 percent (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §5577.043).

Wood Products: A vehicle transporting chips, sawdust, mulch, bark, pulpwood, biomass, or firewood to a first transfer point and on non-Interstate highways may exceed the State's GVW and axle weight limits by 7.5 percent (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §5577.043).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

None.115

Other Exemptions

Tow Trucks: State weight limits do not apply to the initial towing of a wrecked or disabled vehicle from the site of an emergency. Subsequent towing is not exempt from the State weight limits (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §5577.15).

Fire Trucks: Vehicles run upon stationary rails or tracks, fire engines, fire trucks, or other vehicles or apparatus belonging to or used by any municipal or volunteer fire department in the discharge of its functions are exempt from Ohio weight limits (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §5577.02).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Director of transportation may issue special permits authorizing the transportation of loads in excess of State weight limits. Permits may be issued for any period of time less than 1 year or for the duration of any public construction project. In regards to the rules and provisions relating to permits, milk transported in bulk is deemed to be a non-divisible load (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 4513.34).116, 117

The overweight permit limit is 120,000 lbs. Any weight greater than that needs special permission from the Director. Milk transported in bulk by vehicle and three or fewer aluminum coils transported by a vehicle are deemed a non-divisible load (Ohio Admin. Code 5501:2-1-10).

Michigan Border Permit: This permit allows an overweight vehicle to move between a specified point in Williams, Fulton, or Lucas counties in Ohio and the Michigan border over prescribed routes. The permitted weight is based on the State of Michigan's weight law, with a gross vehicle weight not to exceed 154,000 lbs., and permitted vehicles must have a sufficient number of axles to meet the Michigan weight law (Ohio Admin. Code 5501:2-1-01).

Ohio Turnpike: The Ohio Turnpike and Infrastructure Commission (OTIC) operates the Ohio Turnpike. Permits for overweight vehicles are available. The LCV gross weight limits are set by the Federal grandfather provision.

See http://www.ohioturnpike.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/spec_haul_perm_info___.pdf; and http://www.ohioturnpike.org/.

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: I-76 (Ohio Turnpike) from Turnpike Exit 15 to PA; I-80 (Ohio Turnpike) from Turnpike Exit 8A to Turnpike Exit 15; I-80/90 (Ohio Turnpike) from IN to Turnpike Exit 8A; OH-7 from Turnpike Exit 16 extending 1 mile south.118

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Ohio State statute.119

[ Return to list of States. ]


Oklahoma

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Oklahoma are found in Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-109 (available on the State's Web site at http://www.oklegislature.gov/osstatuestitle.html).

Additional information about Oklahoma truck weight limits can be found on the Oklahoma DOT Web site at http://www.okladot.state.ok.us/.

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Oklahoma has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 90,000 lbs. GVW on parts of the Interstate system. See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

  1. Oklahoma State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles and commodities.
  2. Oklahoma State statute allows for several tolerances for axle weights and/or GVW for various commodities and vehicles.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State's bridge formula, which is adopted from the FBF, with some exceptions as noted above (Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-109). All weight limits in Oklahoma statute are subject to Federal limits imposed by 23 U.S.C. §127 (Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-101[D]). Exhibit 49 provides a summary of Oklahoma weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 49: Summary of Oklahoma Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle Per State weight table
Gross Weight* 80,000 lbs.
Other 80,000 lbs. on Interstate highways 90,000 lbs. on non-Interstate highways
* The GVW limits are not explicitly stated. §14-109.2 does contain language showing 80,000 lbs. as a limit on Interstates and 90,000 lbs. for non-Interstate highways.

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Refuse: The gross vehicle weight of a utility or refuse collection vehicle may exceed the State weight limits by 15 percent while traveling on non-Interstate highways (Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-109[E][1]).

Forestry Products: Vehicles transporting timber, pulpwood, and chips in their natural State may exceed the State gross weight limit by no more than 5 percent while traveling on non-Interstate highways (Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-109[E][2]).

Aggregates: Vehicles transporting rock, sand, gravel, coal, and flour may exceed the State axle limits by no more than 5 percent while traveling on non-Interstate highways (Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-109[E][2]).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for auxiliary power units or idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to gross vehicle weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-109[F]).

Other Exemptions

Oil and Gas Equipment: Vehicles transporting oil field fluids, oil field equipment, or equipment used in drilling and exploration may exceed the State gross weight limit by no more than 5 percent while traveling on non-Interstate highways (Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-109[E][2]).

Tow Trucks: Wreckers or tow vehicles removing disabled, abandoned, or damaged vehicles to the nearest repair terminal are not subject to the State weight limits. This exemption does not apply to vehicles traveling on Interstate highways (Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-109[E][4]).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles120

Special permits may be issued for divisible loads for vehicle configurations in excess of six axles. The permits may not exceed the Table "B" Federal weights formula imposed by Title 23, U.S.C., Section 127. Vehicles moving under the permits may not traverse H-15 bridges or less without the express approval of the Secretary of Transportation (Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-109(C)).

Special Overload Permit: Utility or refuse collection vehicles; vehicles transporting timber, pulpwood, and chips in their natural state; vehicles transporting oilfield equipment or equipment used in oil and gas well drilling or exploration; vehicles transporting rock, sand, gravel, and coal; and vehicles transporting grain, operating under exceptions, shall purchase an annual special overload permit (Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-109(G)).

Refuse: The GVW of a utility or refuse collection vehicle may not exceed the otherwise applicable weight by more than 15 percent on non-Interstate highways. The weight on individual axles must not exceed the manufacturer's component rating, which includes axle, suspension, wheels, rims, brakes, and tires as shown on the vehicle certification label or tag (Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-109(E)(1)).

Various Commodities:121 Vehicles transporting the following comedies may exceed the gross weight limit by no more than 5 percent as long as the vehicle is registered for the maximum allowable rate and does not travel on the Interstate System:

  • Timber,
  • Pulpwood and chips in their natural state;
  • Oil field fluids;
  • Oil field equipment;
  • Equipment used in oil and gas well drilling or exploration; and
  • Grain.

(Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-109(E)(2))

Rock, Sand, Gravel, Coal, and Flour: Vehicles transporting rock, sand, gravel, and coal may exceed axle weight limits by no more than 5 percent as long as the vehicle is registered for the maximum allowable rate and do not travel on the Interstate System (Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-109(E)(3)).

Non-divisible Loads: The department of public safety may issue annual permits for overweight non-divisible loads. Under such permits, the GVW shall not exceed 120,000 lbs. The permits may be issued as transferrable among vehicles or non-transferrable (Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-103G). The transportation commission is authorized to formulate rules governing the movement of vehicles exceeding State weight limits, providing a basis for issuing permits by the Commissioner of public safety, and publishes the Oklahoma Load Limit Map. This map shows the maximum size and weight limits of various highways structures and bridges. The Commissioner of public safety has the authority to issue special permits to operate vehicles exceeding State weight limits (Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-118).

Multistate Agreements: State law permits the Department of Transportation to enter into multistate agreements for regional or national single trip overweight permits for non-divisible loads (Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-118.1).

Fire Trucks: The Commissioner of public safety is authorized to issue annual overweight permits, at no cost, to municipalities and rural fire districts to transport fire trucks (Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-101[B][1]).

Implements of Husbandry: The Commissioner of public safety is authorized to issue annual overweight permits, at no cost, to owners and retails dealers of implements of husbandry for temporary movement upon highways (Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-101[B][2 – 3]).

Construction Equipment: Any rubber-tired road construction vehicle that is overweight is authorized to move on non-Interstate highways. For movement on Interstate highways, a permit may be issued, as long as Federal weight restrictions are not violated. Such vehicles are limited to 650 lbs. per inch width of tire (Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 47, §14-118[H]).

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: Doubles with 29-foot trailers may use any route on the NN in Oklahoma, including Interstate highways. Doubles with trailers over 29 feet are limited to Interstate highways and 45 separate Oklahoma highway segments, which are listed in 23 CFR 658, Appendix C.

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Oklahoma State statute.

[ Return to list of States. ]


Oregon

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Oregon can be found in Or. Rev. Stat. §§818.010 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at https://www.oregonlegislature.gov/bills_laws/ors/ors818.html). Additional information about Oregon truck weight limits can be found on the Oregon DOT Web site at http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/pages/index.aspx.

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Oregon has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 105,500 lbs. GVW on the Interstate System. See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

Oregon State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles and commodities.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by State tire weight limits, State axle weight limits, and a State weight table (Or. Rev. Stat. §818.010). Exhibit 50 provides a summary of Oregon weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 50: Summary of Oregon Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle Per State weight table
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Other 600 lbs. per inch of tire width
10,000 lbs. per wheel

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Garbage or Refuse: Subject to the maximum weight limitations in the State weight tables, any vehicle with a single rear axle specially equipped with a self-compactor and used exclusively for garbage or refuse operations may have a loaded weight upon a single axle of not more than 22,000 lbs. when laden with garbage or refuse. This exemption does not apply to travel on Interstate highways (Or. Rev. Stat. §818.030[5]).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemption

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to State maximum allowable weight limits or permitted limits, is up to 400 lbs. (Or. Rev. Stat. §818.030[10] and §818.340[4]).

Other Exemptions

Farm Vehicles: State law contains a separate weight table that applies only to registered farm vehicles transporting field-loaded agricultural products in Malheur County. This table allows tandem axles to carry 37,800 lbs., but GVW is still limited to 80,000 lbs. The weights authorized under this table do not apply to Interstate 84 or U.S. Highway 95 (Or. Rev. Stat. §818.010[4]).

Government-Owned Vehicles: State weight limits do not apply to any vehicle, combination of vehicles, article, machine, or other equipment while being used by the Federal Government, the State of Oregon, or any county or incorporated city to construct, maintain, or repair public highways and at the immediate location or site of such construction, maintenance, or repair (Or. Rev. Stat. §818.030[3]).

Construction Vehicles: Vehicles being used to construct a street or highway are exempt from State maximum weight limits to the extent set out in a government agency contract (Or. Rev. Stat. §801.026[2] and [4]).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

A road authority or a private contractor authorized by a road authority is authorized to issue variance permits allowing a vehicle to travel over any highway under their jurisdiction while exceeding State maximum weight limits (Or. Rev. Stat. §818.200[1][a]). The State Department of Transportation is authorized to issue continuous variance permits that are valid across all road authorities. If requested by another road authority, the department must allow that authority to distribute continuous variance permits, but only if that road authority is participating in the statewide continuous variance permits system developed by the department. The department may also contract with private contractors to distribute continuous variance permits. Variance permits and continuous variance permits may be issued for up to 1 year for single-trip, a number of trips, or continuous operation and must identify specific routes on which the permit is valid. A permit may also establish time limits or other conditions (Or. Rev. Stat. §818.210 through §818.220).

Variance permits and continuous variance permits cannot, in general, be issued to divisible vehicles. They can, however, be issued to self-loading log trucks, which are subject to their own weight table that in some specific cases exceeds the FBF (Or. Rev. Stat. §818.210). These permits also can be issued to vehicles that are used in the construction, maintenance, or repair of public highways that are not covered by the blanket exemption from State weight limits for government-owned vehicles at a construction site and to vehicle combinations with a combined loaded weight in excess of State weight limits (Or. Rev. Stat. §818.210[4] and [5]).

Overweight permits are available for vehicles with the following:

  • Two consecutive sets of tandem axles may have a loaded weight of 34,000 lbs. each when operating on Interstate highways with a permit and on other highways without a permit, provided that the distance between the first and last axles of the two sets of tandem axles is at least 30 feet but less than 36 feet.
  • A group of four axles consisting of a set of tandem axles and two axles spaced 9 feet or more apart may have a loaded weight of more than 65,500 lbs. and up to 70,000 lbs. when operating on Interstate highways with a permit and on other highways without a permit, provided that the distance between the first and last axles of the group is 35 feet or more (Or. Rev. Stat. §818.030).

Divisible Load Variance Permit: If a road authority other than the State issues a variance permit for a divisible load with a combined weight of more than 80,000 lbs., the variance permit shall be a 1-year permit that is valid for continuous operation (Or. Rev. Stat. Ann. §818.220).

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: Vehicle combinations with a truck tractor and two trailing units may exercise the grandfather provision on all NN routes, including Interstate highways. Vehicle combinations with a truck tractor and three trailing units are limited to specific routes, which are listed in 23 CFR 658, Appendix C.

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Oregon State statute.

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Pennsylvania

The laws governing truck size and weight in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania are found in Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §§4901 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://law.justia.com/codes/pennsylvania/2012/title-75/chapter-49/).

Also see Pennsylvania Code Title 67 Chapter 185 – Axle Weight Table, Pa. Code Title 67, §185 (available on the State's Web site at http://www.pacode.com/secure/data/067/chapter185/chap185toc.html).

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

  1. Regular operations limit vehicles to 22,400 lbs. for a single axle and up to 38,000 lbs. for a tandem axle.
  2. Pennsylvania State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles and commodities.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State gross weight limits, the State axle weight limits, and the State bridge formula, which is adopted from the FBF (Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4941 and §4943). Exhibit 51 provides a summary of Pennsylvania weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 51: Summary of Pennsylvania Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs. for steering axles
20,000 lbs. for vehicles with GVW over 73,280 lbs.
22,400 lbs. for vehicles with GVW under 73,280 lbs.*
22,400 lbs. if axles are spaced more than 6 feet apart and carrying a gross weight of 73,280 lbs. or less
18,000 lbs. if less than 6 feet and carrying a gross weight of 73,280 lbs. or less
20,000 lbs. if registered and carrying more than 73,280 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
34,000 lbs. if registered and carrying more than 73,280 lbs. with 4-foot spacing**
21,400 lbs. if registered in Classes 17 and 20 (non-Interstate)†
Tridem Axle Per State weight table
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs..
Other 3 percent tolerance‡
800 lbs. per inch width of tire
* For axles spaced 6 feet or more apart. Axles spaced less than 6 feet apart, on a vehicle with a GVW less than 73,280 lbs., are limited to 18,000 lbs.
** An additional 1,000 lbs. is allowed per additional foot of spacing up to 40,000 lbs. and 10 feet of spacing.
† Trucks registered in Classes 17 and 20 shall not have an overall gross weight in excess of 60,000 lbs. on a group of three tandem axles (non-Interstate).
† This tolerance is permitted when a vehicle is weighed on a portable or stationary scale on non-Interstate highways. The tolerance does not apply on Interstate highways when a vehicle is weighed on a stationary scale (Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4981[c]).

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

None.

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight and gross vehicle weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the weight of the unit, whichever is less (Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 35, §4604).

Other Exemptions

Fire Trucks: State weight limits do not apply to fire trucks unless specifically stated (Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4906).

Construction Equipment: When operating within an established construction zone as specified in the highway construction plan, no permit is required to move on any highway oversized or overweight vehicles of the department or a contractor or other person currently involved in the authorized construction or maintenance of the highway. Movement under this section is not authorized on posted bridges, unless the posted bridge is currently being reconstructed or maintained (Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4963).

Tow Trucks: The State weight limits do not apply to a combination consisting of any tow truck towing a disabled motor vehicle to a place of repairs or other place of safety as long as the overweight combination travels directly to the first available such location and the movement is performed at the direction of authorized emergency personnel or a qualified Commonwealth employee (Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4949).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Department of Transportation of the Commonwealth is authorized to issue permits for the movement of overweight loads. A permit may be issued for a vehicle or combination of vehicles that, loaded or unloaded, exceeds the State weight limits. Each permit may contain trip limits, may contain seasonal or time limitations, and may be limited to specific highways. In the event of an emergency, oral authorization may be provided by the Department of Transportation or local authorities for the movement of overweight loads (Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4961 and §4962 and §4964).

Quarry Equipment: An annual permit may be issued for the movement of a piece of quarry equipment or machinery exceeding the maximum State size or weight limits across any highway other than a freeway from one part of a quarry to another, or upon highways other than freeways connecting by the most direct route to any quarries or portions of quarries under single ownership or operation, but no permit shall be issued for the movement of equipment or machinery for a distance greater than one mile (Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4966).

Flat-Rolled Steel Coils or Slabs: A combination of vehicles that is hauling flat-rolled steel coils or steel slabs may be permitted by the department and local authorities to move upon highways within their respective jurisdictions a distance not exceeding 50 miles, if the gross weight does not exceed 100,000 lbs. and the weight of any non-steering axle does not exceed 21,000 lbs. No permit may be issued for this type of movement upon an Interstate highway.

Raw Milk: A combination of vehicles that is hauling raw milk to or from a manufacturer may be permitted by the department and local authorities to move upon highways within their respective jurisdictions 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, except during inclement weather as defined in department regulations, if the gross weight does not exceed 95,000 lbs. and the weight of any non-steering axle does not exceed 21,000 lbs. No permit may be issued for this type of movement upon an Interstate highway.

Hot Ingot/Hot Box: A combination of vehicles that is hauling a hot ingot or a hot box may be permitted by the department and local authorities to move upon highways within their respective jurisdictions a distance not exceeding 25 miles if the gross weight does not exceed 150,000 lbs. and the weight of any non-steering axle does not exceed 21,000 lbs. No permit may be issued for this type of movement upon an Interstate highway.

Self-Propelled Crane: A self-propelled crane that is being road tested may be permitted by the department and local authorities to move upon highways within their respective jurisdictions a distance not exceeding 15 miles, if the gross weight does not exceed 150,000 lbs. and the weight on any axle does not exceed 27,000 lbs. (Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4979.4).

Raw Coal: A combination of vehicles that is hauling raw coal from a mine to a processing or preparation facility may be permitted by the department and local authorities to move upon highways within their respective jurisdictions a distance not exceeding 30 miles if the gross weight does not exceed 95,000 lbs. and the weight of any non-steering axle does not exceed 21,000 lbs. No permit may be issued for this type of movement upon an Interstate highway.

Raw Water: A combination of vehicles that are hauling raw water from a spring to a bottling facility may be permitted by the department and local authorities to move upon specified highways within their respective jurisdictions subject to the following conditions:

  • The vehicle must be a six-axle combination - three-axle truck tractor.
  • Gross vehicular weight must not exceed 96,900 lbs.
  • Maximum weight on steering axles must not exceed 11,000 lbs.
  • Maximum weight on the truck-tractor tandem (axles two and three) must not exceed 38,000 lbs., with a maximum of 19,500 lbs. on either axle in the group.
  • Maximum weight on the semitrailer tridem (axles four, five, and six) must not exceed 47,700 lbs., with a maximum of 16,400 lbs. on any axle in the group.
  • Minimum spacing between axle one and axle two must not be less than 12 feet 11 inches.
  • The center-to-center distance between the last drive axle of the truck tractor (axle three) and the first axle of the semitrailer (axle four) must be a minimum of 26 feet 7 inches.
  • Minimum spacing between tandem and tridem axles must not be less than 4 feet 1 inch.
  • No permit may be issued for this type of movement upon an Interstate highway.

Pulpwood/Wood Chips: A combination of vehicles that is hauling pulpwood or wood chips from a specified source to a pulp mill may be permitted by the department and local authorities to move upon specified highways within their respective jurisdictions subject to the following conditions:

  • The vehicle must be a five-axle combination – three-axle truck tractor meeting the following characteristics:
    • Gross vehicular weight must not exceed 95,000 lbs.
    • Maximum weight on steering axles must not exceed 11,000 lbs.
    • Maximum weight on the truck-trailer tandem (axles two and three) must not exceed 42,000 lbs., with a maximum of 21,000 lbs. on either axle in the group.
    • Maximum weight on the semitrailer tridem (axles four and five) must not exceed 42,000 lbs., with a maximum of 21,000 lbs. on any axle in the group.
    • Minimum spacing between axle one and axle two must be a minimum of 12 feet 6 inches.
    • The center-to-center distance between the last drive axle of the truck tractor (axle three) and the first axle of the semitrailer (axle four) must be a minimum of 28 feet 0 inch.
    • Minimum spacing between tandem and tridem axles must not be less than 4 feet 0 inches.
  • The vehicle must be a six-axle combination – three-axle truck tractor meeting the following characteristics:
    • Gross vehicular weight must not exceed 107,000 lbs.
    • Maximum weight on steering axles must not exceed 12,000 lbs.
    • Maximum weight on the truck-tractor tandem (axles two and three) must not exceed 42,000 lbs., with a maximum of 21,000 lbs. on either axle in the group.
    • Maximum weight on the semitrailer tridem (axles four, five, and six) must not exceed 53,000 lbs., with a maximum of 17,670 lbs. on any axle in the group.
    • Minimum spacing between axle one and axle two must not be less than 12 feet 6 inches.
    • The center-to-center distance between the last drive axle of the truck tractor (axle three) and the first axle of the semitrailer (axle four) must be a minimum of 45 feet 0 inches.
    • Minimum spacing between tandem and tridem axles must not be less than 4 feet 0 inches.

Aircraft Refueling Vehicle: An aircraft refueling vehicle manufactured for the United States Department of Defense that is being road tested and is carrying a load required under contract with the Department of Defense as part of the road test procedure may be permitted by the department and local authorities to move upon highways within their respective jurisdictions a distance not exceeding 35 miles if, for a three-axle vehicle, the gross weight does not exceed 70,000 lbs. and the weight on any axle does not exceed 26,000 lbs. No permit may be issued for this type of movement upon an Interstate highway.

Cryogenic Liquid: None.122

Eggs: None.123

Construction Equipment: A permit may be issued for the duration of a single construction project, not exceeding 1 year, authorizing a public utility or its contractors or subcontractors to move oversized or overweight construction equipment across or upon highways immediately adjacent to the construction site and between the construction site and the base of operations of the utility company, contractor, or subcontractor. A combination transporting construction equipment under a single-trip permit may be driven 24 hours per day, 7 days a week outside of the designated urbanized areas, subject to the following conditions:

  • The equipment being transported is used exclusively for highway construction.
  • The maximum width of the load and vehicle does not exceed 10 feet.
  • The maximum gross weight of the vehicle and load does not exceed 135,000 lbs.

(Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4970)

Containerized Cargo: An annual permit may be issued authorizing the movement on highways of containerized cargo that exceeds the maximum vehicle gross or maximum axle weights specified in Subchapter C (relating to maximum weights of vehicles). Except as set forth in subsection (b), the weight of any combination permitted under this section shall not exceed 90,000 lbs. overall gross weight and 21,000 lbs. on any axle. A brake retarder is not required on a combination permitted under this section while the combination is operated within the counties of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia. A vehicle operating with a permit authorized under this section may be driven 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, except on holidays and in inclement weather as specified in departmental regulations (Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4974).

Refrigerated Meat Products: An annual permit may be issued authorizing the movement on specified highways of containerized cargo consisting of refrigerated meat products that exceeds the maximum vehicle gross weight or maximum axle weights specified in Subchapter C, subject to the following conditions:

  • The vehicle must be a six-axle combination – three-axle truck tractor.
  • Gross vehicular weight must not exceed 107,500 lbs.
  • Maximum weight on any axle must not exceed 21,000 lbs.
  • Specified highways and routes may only be permitted in the counties of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia.

(Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4974)

Domestic Animal Feed and Whole/Unprocessed Grain: An annual permit may be issued authorizing the movement on highways of domestic animal feed and whole or unprocessed grain, in bulk, that exceeds the maximum vehicle gross weight specified in Subchapter C (relating to maximum weights of vehicles). The weight of any vehicle permitted under this section may not exceed 95,000 lbs. overall gross weight and the weight on any non-steering axle does not exceed 21,000 lbs. No permit may be issued for this type of movement upon an Interstate highway (Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4976).

Live Domestic Animals: An annual permit may be issued authorizing the movement on highways of live domestic animals that exceeds the maximum gross weight specified in Subchapter C (relating to maximum weights of vehicles). The weight of any combination permitted under this section may not exceed 95,000 lbs. gross weight, and the weight on any non-steering axle may not exceed 21,000 lbs. No permit may be issued for this type of movement upon an Interstate highway (Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4976.1).

Building Structural Components: A permit may be issued for the duration of a single building construction project, not exceeding 1 year, authorizing the movement upon specified highways of non-divisible building structural components, such as precast concrete, roof trusses, or wall panels, which exceed the maximum width, height, or length specified in Subchapter B (relating to width, height, and length) or the maximum gross weight specified in Subchapter C (relating to maximum weights of vehicles). Combinations permitted under this section may not exceed 90 feet in length, 13 feet in width, 14 feet 6 inches in height, or 116,000 lbs. gross vehicle weight (Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4978).

Particleboard or Fiberboard Used to Manufacture Ready-to-assemble Furniture: An annual permit may be issued authorizing the movement on specified highways of particleboard or fiberboard for use in manufacturing ready-to-assemble household or office furniture that exceeds the maximum vehicle gross weight specified in Subchapter C (relating to maximum weights of vehicles). Permits issued under this section may not exceed a distance of 70 miles. The weight of any vehicle permitted under this section may not exceed 107,000 lbs. overall gross weight and shall have the following maximum axle weight limits for all non-steering axles:

Single axle: 21,000 lbs.
Tandem axles: 42,000 lbs.
Tridem axles: 53,000 lbs.
Quad axles: 63,000 lbs.

(Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4979)

Bulk Refined Oil: An annual permit may be issued authorizing the movement on specified highways of refined oil in bulk between a refinery and a distribution facility that exceeds the maximum vehicle gross weight specified in Subchapter C (relating to maximum weights of vehicles). Permits issued under this section shall not exceed a distance of 125 miles. The weight of any vehicle permitted under this section may not exceed 107,000 lbs. overall gross weight and shall have the following maximum axle weight limits for all non-steering axles:

Single axle: 21,000 lbs.
Tandem axles: 42,000 lbs.
Tridem axles: 53,000 lbs.
Quad axles: 63,000 lbs.

(Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4979.1)

Waste Coal: An annual permit may be issued for the movement on specified highways of waste coal from a refuse pile to a preparation or power production facility or beneficial combustion ash from a power production facility to a reclamation area that exceeds the maximum vehicle gross weight specified in Subchapter C (relating to maximum weights of vehicles). The weight of any vehicle permitted under this section may not exceed 95,000 lbs. overall gross weight, and the weight on any non-steering axle may not exceed 21,000 lbs. No permit may be issued for this type of movement upon an Interstate highway. Also, an annual permit may be issued for the movement on specified highways of limestone from a quarry to a power production facility that exceeds the maximum vehicle gross weight specified in Subchapter C, subject to the following conditions:

  • The combination must have a minimum of six axles.
  • The maximum overall gross weight may not exceed 95,000 lbs.
  • The weight on any non-steering axle may not exceed 21,000 lbs.
  • The maximum travel distance may not exceed 100 miles.
  • No permit may be issued for this type of movement on an Interstate highway.

(Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4979.2)

Float Glass or Flat Glass for Use in Construction and Other End Uses: An annual permit may be issued authorizing the movement on specified highways of float glass or flat glass for use in construction and other end uses that exceeds the maximum vehicle gross weight specified in Subchapter C (relating to maximum weights of vehicles). The weight of any vehicle permitted under this section may not exceed 100,000 lbs. overall gross weight, must be a five axle combination – three axle truck tractor, and may not exceed the following maximum axle weight limits for all axles:

Steering axles: 12,000 lbs.
Truck tractor tandem axles: 44,000 lbs. with a maximum of 22,500 lbs. on either axle in the group
Semitrailer tandem axles: 44,000 lbs. with a maximum of 22,500 lbs. on either axle in the group

(Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4979.3)

Nonhazardous Liquid Glue: An annual permit may be issued authorizing the movement on specified highways of nonhazardous liquid glue in bulk between a chemical plant and a particleboard or fiberboard manufacturing facility that exceeds the maximum vehicle gross weight specified in Subchapter C (relating to maximum weights of vehicles). Permits issued under this section shall not exceed a distance of 75 miles. The weight of any vehicle permitted under this section may not exceed 105,000 lbs. overall gross weight and shall have the following maximum axle weight limits for all non-steering axles:

Single axle: 21,000 lbs.
Tandem axles: 42,000 lbs.
Tridem axles: 53,000 lbs.
Quad axles: 63,000 lbs.

Waste Tires: An annual permit may be issued for the movement on specified highways of waste tires, tire-derived fuel, or chipped tires from a refuse pile to a preparation or power production facility that exceeds the maximum vehicle gross weight specified in Subchapter C (relating to maximum weights of vehicles). The weight of any vehicle permitted under this section may not exceed 95,000 lbs. overall gross weight, and the weight on any non-steering axle may not exceed 21,000 lbs. No permit may be issued for this type of movement upon an Interstate highway (Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4979.6).

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Pennsylvania State statute.

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Rhode Island

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Rhode Island are found in R.I. Gen. Laws §§31-25-1 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://webserver.rilin.state.ri.us/Statutes/TITLE31/31-25/INDEX.HTM).

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Rhode Island has a grandfather provision under Federal law (Grandfathered Weight Provisions 1956) to allow vehicles to operate up to 22,400 lbs. on a single axle and 36,000 lbs. on a tandem axle on all highways including the Interstate system.124

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Rhode Island, provisions do exist in State law that allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits: Rhode Island State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles and commodities.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operation is governed by the State axle limits and the State bridge formula, which is adopted from the FBF (R.I. Gen. Laws §31-25-13 and §31-25-14). See Exhibit 52 for a summary of Rhode Island weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 52: Summary of Rhode Island Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 22,400 lbs.
Tandem Axle 36,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle n/a
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Other n/a

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Refuse-hauling Vehicles: Vehicles designed and used for the hauling of refuse are exempt from State axle weight restrictions when hauling refuse on non-Interstate highways (R.I. Gen. Laws §31-25-29).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

None.

Other Exemptions

Road Machinery: Road machinery vehicles are exempt from Rhode Island State weight limitations (R.I. Gen. Laws §31-25-2).

Farm Vehicles & Tractors: Farm vehicles and tractors are exempt from Rhode Island State weight limitations (R.I. Gen. Laws §31-25-2).

Public Transit Vehicles: A specific vehicle type owned and operated by the Rhode Island public transit authority125 is exempt from Rhode Island State weight limitations (R.I. Gen. Laws §31-25-2).

Fire Trucks: Fire trucks acquired by a city or a town within the State before July 1, 1999, are exempt from Rhode Island State weight limitations (R.I. Gen. Laws §31-25-2).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Department of Transportation can issue permits for highways under its jurisdiction to operate a vehicle or combination of vehicles exceeding 80,000 lbs. Permits may be issued for a single trip or up to a full year. The Department of Transportation may not issue permits for divisible loads weighing in excess of 104,800 lbs. GVW for five-axle vehicles and 76,650 lbs. GVW for three-axle vehicles (R.I. Gen. Laws §31-25-21[a]).

Non-divisible Construction Loads Permit: Blanket construction equipment permits may be issued, as determined by the Department of Transportation, for intrastate movement of non-divisible loads. The duration of the blanket permit may not exceed 1 year. The division of motor vehicles may not issue blanket permits for non-divisible loads weighing in excess of 130,000 lbs. on less than six axles with individual axle weights exceeding 25,000 lbs. For permits allowing vehicle movements in excess of 130,000 lbs., the Department of Transportation is able to issue a special trip permit if the vehicle is hauling a non-divisible load. Construction equipment blanket permits may not be granted for travel over the following bridges:

  • Blackstone River Viaduct 750 carrying I-295 northbound and southbound over the Blackstone River, and
  • Kingston Road Bridge No. 403 carrying I-95 northbound and southbound over Kingston Road.

(R.I. Gen. Laws §31-25-21[e] and [f])

Reciprocal Agreements: The Department of Transportation may enter into reciprocal agreements with other States, the District of Columbia, and Canadian provinces regulating overweight permits (R.I. Gen. Laws §31-25-21[b]).

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Rhode Island State statute.

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South Carolina

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of South Carolina are found in S.C. Code Ann. §§56-5-4010 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://www.scstatehouse.gov/code/t56c005.php).

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

South Carolina has a grandfather provision under Federal law (Grandfathered Weight Provisions 1974) to allow vehicles to operate up to 35,200 lbs. on a tandem axle on all highways, including the Interstate System.126

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in South Carolina, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  • South Carolina State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles and commodities.
  • South Carolina State statute allows for several tolerances, up to 15 percent, for axle weights and GVW for specific vehicles and commodities.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operation (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State axle limits, the State gross weight limits for number of axles on a vehicle or combination of vehicles, and the State bridge formula, which is adopted from the FBF, for Interstate travel (S.C. Code Ann. §56-5-4140). See Exhibit 53 for a summary of South Carolina weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 53: Summary of South Carolina Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 10,000 lbs. per wheel
20,000 lbs. on Interstate highways including enforcement tolerance
Tandem Axle 35,200 lbs. on all highways if GVW is 75,185 lbs. or less*
36,000 lbs. on non-Interstate highways
Tridem Axle Per State weight table
Gross Weight 73,280 lbs. on non-Interstate highways
80,000 lbs. on Interstate highways
Other 10 percent tolerance on non-Interstate highways (S.C. Code Ann. §56-5-4160[A])
* If the GVW is 75,185 lbs. or less, the tandem axle maximum is 35,200, and the Bridge formula does not apply.

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Timber Equipment: Timber equipment is exempt from South Carolina laws governing size, weight, and load on non-Interstate highways (S.C. Code Ann. §56-5-4020).

Soil-improvement Products: Liquid fertilizer storage facilities and vehicles or combinations of vehicles used to transport, store, or spread lime, nitrogen, or other ag-chemical products are exempt from South Carolina laws governing size, weight, and load on non-Interstate highways (S.C. Code Ann. §56-5-4020).

Aggregate-Hauling Trucks: Several types of vehicles are not required to conform to State axle spacing requirements while on non-Interstate highways. However, the vehicle is limited to a weight of 20,000 lbs. for each axle plus scale tolerances, and the maximum gross weight of these vehicles may not exceed its allowed GVW plus allowable scale tolerances. This exemption applies to the following vehicles:

  • Dump trucks/dump trailers;
  • Trucks carrying agricultural products;
  • Concrete mixing trucks;
  • Fuel oil trucks;
  • Lime trucks; and
  • Trucks designated and constructed for special types of work or use.

(S.C. Code Ann. §56-5-4140[B][1])

Concrete Mixing Trucks: Concrete mixing trucks that operate within a 15-mile radius of their home base are exempt from State weight requirements while on non-Interstate highways. However, these vehicles are limited to a maximum load of the rated capacity of the concrete mixer, the true gross load not to exceed 66,000 lbs. All of these vehicles shall have at least three axles each with brake-equipped wheels (S.C. Code Ann. §56-5-4140[B][2]).

Special Commodity Tolerances:

  • Enforcement tolerance is 15 percent for a vehicle or trailer transporting unprocessed forest products or only on non-Interstate routes (S.C. Code Ann. §56-5-4140[A][2]).
  • Enforcement tolerance is 15 percent for a vehicle or trailer transporting sod only on non-Interstate routes (S.C. Code Ann. §56-5-4140[A][3]).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for idle reduction systems similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight and gross vehicle weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (S.C. Code Ann. §56-5-4160[L]).

Other Exemptions

Fire Trucks: Fire trucks are exempt from South Carolina laws governing size, weight, and load (S.C. Code Ann. §56-5-4020).

Road Machinery: Road machinery or implements are exempt from South Carolina laws governing size, weight, and load (S.C. Code Ann. §56-5-4020).

Implements of Husbandry: Implements of husbandry, including farm tractors, are exempt from South Carolina laws governing size, weight, and load (S.C. Code Ann. §56-5-4020).

Well-drilling, Boring Rigs, and Tender Trucks: Well-drilling, boring rigs, and tender trucks are not required to conform to State axle spacing requirements while on non-Interstate highways. However, the vehicle is limited to 70,000 lbs. GVW and 25,000 lbs. for each axle plus scale tolerances (S.C. Code Ann. §56-5-4140[B][3]).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

Special Permits: The Department of Transportation may issue special permits authorizing the movement of vehicles or combinations of vehicles exceeding the State weight limits. Though all vehicles and loads are eligible for consideration, specific consideration is given to loads that cannot be disassembled readily (S.C. Code Ann. §57-3-130). Multitrip permits may be issued by the Department of Transportation for overweight non-divisible loads (S.C. Code Ann. §57-3-150).

Soil Improvement Products: Vehicles used to transport, store, or spread soil improvement products and to transport products of husbandry must obtain an annual special permit to be exempt from State weight limits (S.C. Code Ann. §57-3-130[C]).

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in South Carolina State statute.

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South Dakota

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of South Dakota are found in S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §§32-22-1 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://legis.sd.gov/Statutes/Codified_Laws/DisplayStatute.aspx?Type=Statute&Statute=32-22). State regulations related to overweight permits are in S.D. Admin. Code §§70:30:01 et seq.

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

South Dakota has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 129,000 lbs. GVW on parts of the interstate system. See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in South Dakota, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits. South Dakota State statute allows for several tolerances for axle weights and/or GVW for various commodities and vehicles.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State weight limits and the State bridge formula, adopted from the FBF (S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §32-22-16 and §32-22-16.1). See Exhibit 54 for a summary of South Dakota weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 53: Summary of South Dakota Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle Per FBF
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs. on Interstate highways (except grandfathered routes)
Subject to State bridge formula on non-Interstate highways
Other 600 lbs. per inch of tire width on steering axles and axles with dual tires*
500 lbs. per inch of tire width on all other axles (S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §32-22-21)
* State law was amended on March 14, 2013, to permit the 600 lbs. per inch of tire width limit on certain axles of vehicles traveling on the Interstate system and certain designated routes (S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §32-22-21.2).

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Unfinished Logs: Vehicles hauling unfinished logs on non-Interstate highways are exempt from State axle and tire limits if the GVW is less than 80,000 lbs. and the vehicle is adjusted to the State axle and tire limits (S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §32-22-16.2).

Stored Agriculture Commodities: Vehicles hauling agriculture products from storage on a farm may exceed State weight limits by up to 5 percent. This tolerance is for travel within 50 miles of the farm on non-Interstate highways (S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §32-22-16.3).

Livestock: Vehicles hauling livestock from a farm may exceed State weight limits by up to 5 percent. This tolerance is for travel within 50 miles of the farm on non-Interstate highways (S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §32-22-16.3). In addition, vehicles carrying livestock are not subject to axle limits if the GVW complies with State limits (S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §32-22-42.3).

Harvested Agricultural Commodities: Vehicles hauling agricultural products from a harvesting combine to the point that the products are first unloaded, up to 50 miles, may exceed weight limits on non-Interstate highways by 10 percent (S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §32-22-42.2). In addition, such vehicles are exempt from State axle and tire limits if the GVW is less than 80,000 lbs. and the vehicle is adjusted to the State axle and tire limits (S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §32-22-42.12).

Haystack Mover: A tractor towed or truck-mounted haystack mover may exceed the State weight limits on non-Interstate highways by up to 5 percent (S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §32-22-42.9).

Solid Waste: The maximum gross weight per axle may be exceeded by 5 percent for vehicles hauling solid waste on non-Interstate highways. The maximum gross weight may not exceed the total weight limitations of all the axles combined (S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §32-22-42.10).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

The Federal weight allowance/exemption for idle emission reduction technology allowance for auxiliary power units is granted by enforcement policy in South Dakota rather than by State law; that is, the exception is not specifically enumerated in the statute. The amount that is allowed under enforcement is 400 lbs.127

Other Exemptions

Construction Equipment: State weight limits do not apply to vehicles and equipment on active highway construction projects (S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §32-22-30.1).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The South Dakota Department of Transportation, Division of Operations, or its designee, with respect to highways under their respective jurisdictions, is authorized to issue permits for overweight vehicles (S.D. Admin. Code §70:03:01:17). Also, the division of highway patrol is authorized to issue single-trip permits allowing the movement of overweight vehicles on State highways and Interstate highways (S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §32-22-38). In addition, the division of highway patrol may issue annual permits for the movement of overweight loads. The Department of Transportation may specify the routes on which a vehicle with such permits may travel. The transportation commission may adopt rules in regards to the issuing of overweight permits (S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §32-22-41).

Scale Site Permits: Vehicles may be issued a single-trip permit for the purpose of traveling to a scale site to determine whether the vehicle complies with all State weight limits. This permit is void after the vehicle is weighed at the scale site (S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §32-22-21.1).

Tow Trucks: Any tow truck or wrecker, when moving any damaged, disabled, or abandoned vehicle from any highway emergency to the first point of unloading, may exceed the weight limits by up to 10 percent of the maximum weight allowed. The combination of vehicles may not exceed the posted weight limits of any bridge and must be operating within 200 miles of the tow truck's principal business location (S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §32-22-62).

Sludge Vehicles: The division of highway patrol may issue overweight permits to sludge vehicles owned and operated by a municipality (S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §32-22-42.11).

Straight Truck Booster Axle: A permit may be issued for a straight truck equipped with a booster axle whose loaded weight exceeds weight limits but does not exceed 600 lbs. per inch of tire width. The permit may be issued if the booster axle was installed on the truck before July 1, 1996, and an application form is filled out (S.D. Admin. Code §70:03:01:32.04).

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: U.S.-14 from West Junction U.S.-14 Bypass and U.S.-14 Brookings to South Jct. U.S.-14 and U.S.-281; U.S.-14 Bypass from I-29 Exit 133 to West Junction U.S.-14 Bypass and U.S.-14 Brookings ND; U.S.-85 from I-90 Exit 10 to North Dakota; U.S.-281 from I-90 Exit 310 to South Junction U.S.-14 and U.S/-281; U.S.281 from 8th Avenue Aberdeen to North Dakota; SD-50 from Burleigh Street Yankton to I-29 Exit 26.

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in South Dakota State statute.128

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Tennessee

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Tennessee are found in Tenn. Code Ann. §§55-7-101 et seq. (available on LexisNexis at http://www.lexisnexis.com/hottopics/tncode/). State statutes related to overweight permits are found in Tenn. Code Ann. § 55-7-205.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Tennessee, provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits: Tennessee State statute allows for several tolerances for axle weights and/or GVW for various commodities and vehicle types.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State axle limits and the State bridge formula (Tenn. Code Ann. § 55-7-203). See Exhibit 55 for a summary of Tennessee's weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 55: Summary of Tennessee Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle 54,000 lbs.*
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Other n/a
* Via State contact.

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Cotton: A vehicle used exclusively to transport seed cotton modules may have a tandem axle weight of up to 39,400 lbs. on non-Interstate highways (Tenn. Code Ann. §55-7-115[c and d]).

Axle Limit Exemption: Vehicles transporting crushed stone, fill dirt and rock, soil, bulk sand, coal, clay, shale, phosphate muck, asphalt, concrete, other building materials, solid waste, tankage or animal residues, livestock and agricultural products, or agricultural limestone are not subject to State axle limits as long as the GVW does not exceed State limits and their travel is on non-Interstate highways (Tenn. Code Ann. §55-7-203[6]).

The following vehicles have a 10 percent tolerance of error from the true gross or axle weight:

  • Clay Trucks: Clay trucks are used for hauling clay from the place of extraction to the place where the clay is used or processed.
  • Coal Trucks: These trucks are used for hauling coal and coal products.
  • Farm Vehicles: These are trucks used by farmers to load grain, fiber, produce, livestock, milk, or other agricultural products produced on their farms and to transport the agricultural commodities to their respective markets. The trucks include farm to market transportation when the truck is operated by the farmer, the farmer's family, or an employee or a representative hired by the farmer to haul the commodity.
  • Logging Trucks: These trucks are used for hauling logs, pulpwood, bark, wood chips, or wood dust from the woods to the mill or from the mill to a loading or storage place or market.
  • Machinery Hauling Trucks: These trucks are used for hauling machinery by the owner/operator within a 100-mile radius of the base location of the owner/operator's area of operation, with a limitation of one truck per owner/operator.
  • Phosphate Trucks: These types of trucks are used for hauling phosphate, phosphate products, or other raw materials used in the manufacture of phosphorus.
  • Recovered Materials Trucks: Such trucks are used for hauling recovered materials, but only while those materials are being hauled from the point of generation to the facility where they will be processed for later shipment to an end-user.
  • Sand Trucks: Sand trucks are used for hauling raw sand from the place of extraction to the place where the sand is used or processed.
  • Shale Trucks: Shale trucks are used for hauling shale from the place of extraction to the place where the shale is used or processed.
  • Solid waste trucks: These trucks are used for hauling solid waste, but only while the solid waste is being collected and being hauled from the place or places of collection to a landfill or a disposal facility.

This tolerance can be revoked if an appropriate Federal officer formally notifies the Commissioner of transportation explaining that Tennessee will lose Federal funds with this weight provision in place.

(Tenn. Code Ann. § 55-7-203[7])

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

None.129

Other Exemptions

None.

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Tennessee Department of Transportation is authorized to issue permits for the transportation of non-divisible loads that exceed State weight limits by up 120,000 lbs. For movements of vehicles with weights exceeding 150,000 lbs., a special permit must be obtained from the Commissioner of transportation (Tenn. Code Ann. § 55-7-205).

The Commissioner of transportation is authorized to issue permits for the movement of non-divisible overweight loads. The Commissioner shall create rules and regulations related to the issuance of such permits (Tenn. Code Ann. §55-7-205[a][1] and [e]).

Cotton: The Commissioner of transportation is authorized to issue annual overweight permits for vehicles transporting seed cotton modules. Such permits will allow travel on Interstate highways and other Federal-aid highways designated by the Commissioner. During harvest season, permitted vehicles will not be subject to time or day limitations as prescribed by a standard permit (Tenn. Code Ann. §55-7-205[b]).

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Tennessee State statute.

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Texas

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Texas are found in Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §621.001 through §623.343 (available on the State's Web site at http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/Docs/TN/htm/TN.621.htm#621.001).

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the non-Interstate highway portions of the NHS in Texas, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

1. Texas has several commodity-specific weight exemptions that apply to axle weights and GVW. 2. Texas State statute exempts various types of vehicles from State weight limits.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State axle limits and the State bridge formula, which is adopted from the FBF (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §621.101). See Exhibit 56 for a summary of Texas' weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 56: Summary of Texas Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle n/a
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Other 5 percent tolerance on GVW up to 80,000 lbs. (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §621.403)
5 percent tolerance on axle weight (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §621.404)

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Ready-Mixed Concrete: A ready-mixed concrete truck is allowed 23,000 lbs. on a single axle and 46,000 lbs. on a tandem axle on non-Interstate public highways. Vehicles may exceed these axle weights by 10 percent if the GVW is below 69,000 lbs. and the vehicle obtained a permit130 (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §§622.011 through §622.018 and §623.0171).

Recyclable Materials: A vehicle used exclusively to transport recyclable materials may be operated on non-Interstate public highways with a single axle weight of 21,000 lbs. or less and a tandem axle weight of 44,000 lbs. or less, provided that the GVW is less than 64,000 lbs. This exemption applies only to a vehicle that is equipped with a container roll-off unit or a front-end loader and that is not a tractor-trailer combination (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §622.131 through §622.137).

Milk: A vehicle used exclusively to transport milk may be operated without weight limits on non-Interstate public highways if the weight on any group of axles is less than 68,000 lbs. and the vehicle complies with a specific axle spacing requirement131 (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §622.031).

Cotton or Chile Pepper Modules: State weight limits do not apply to single-motor vehicles used exclusively to transport or process chile pepper modules, seed cotton, or equipment, provided that the GVW of a vehicle hauling seed cotton or equipment is 64,000 lbs. or less and the GVW of a vehicle hauling chile pepper modules or equipment is 54,000 lbs. or less. Such vehicles may only travel on non-Interstate highways (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §622.953).

Solid Waste: A single vehicle used exclusively to transport solid waste may be operated on a non-Interstate public highway of this State only if the tandem axle weight is not heavier than 44,000 lbs., the single axle weight is not heavier than 21,000 lbs., and the gross weight is not heavier than 64,000 lbs. (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.162).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight or gross vehicle weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §622.955).

Auxiliary Power Units: The department of motor vehicles may issue a permit authorizing the operation of a commercial vehicle or combination of vehicles exceeding State maximum weight limits if the vehicle contains an auxiliary power unit that allows the vehicle to operate on electricity or battery power if the department finds that such an exemption would reduce nitrogen oxide emissions (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.0181).

Other Exemptions

Ports of Entry: State weight limits do not apply to vehicles that operate exclusively at a private port of entry, on private roads associated with a port of entry, or across public highways between private roads associated with a port of entry (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §621.101[c][3]).

Fire Trucks: State weight limits do not apply to vehicles owned or operated by a public, private, or volunteer fire department (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §622.952).

Tow Trucks: Tow trucks hauling disabled, abandoned, or accident-damaged vehicles directly to the nearest authorized place of repair, terminal, or vehicle storage facility are exempt from State weight limits on non-Interstate highways (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §622.954).

Contracts to Cross Roads: The Department of Transportation may enter into contracts allowing private overweight vehicles to cross non-controlled access highways from private property to private property. If the vehicle is transporting grain, sand, or another commodity or product, the GVW cannot exceed 110,000 lbs. (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.051 and §623.052).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The department of motor vehicles may issue a permit for the movement on State highways of an overweight vehicle carrying a commodity that cannot be reasonably dismantled (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.071[a]). Routes for such permits shall be listed on the permit and determined by municipalities with State highways in their territories or by the department of motor vehicles (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.072 and §623.080).

Reciprocal Agreements: The Director of the department of motor vehicles is authorized to enter into interstate agreements for the reciprocity of overweight permits between each State (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §621.003).

Lift Equipment: The department of motor vehicles may issue an annual permit for the movement of an unladen lift equipment motor vehicle that exceeds State weight limits over any non-Interstate highway (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.181 and §623.192). Routes for such permits shall be listed on the permit and determined by municipalities with State highways in their territories or by the department of motor vehicles (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.193).

Consolidated Commodity Permits: The board of the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles may authorize the Department of Transportation to issue a permit to a motor carrier to transport multiple loads of the same commodity over a non-Interstate highway above State weight limits if all of the loads are traveling between the same general locations. A vehicle operating under this kind of permit cannot violate Federal size or weight requirements and cannot be transporting a divisible load. The Department of Transportation must complete a route and engineering study (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.0711).

Bales of Hay: The department of motor vehicles may issue a permit for the movement on State highways of an overweight vehicle carrying cylindrically shaped bales of hay (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.071[a]). Routes for such permits shall be listed on the permit and determined by municipalities with State highways in their territories or by the department of motor vehicles (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.072 and §623.080).

Superheavy Equipment: The department of motor vehicles may issue a permit for the movement on State highways of a non-divisible vehicle with a GVW up to 120,000 lbs. The department may issue an annual permit to a motor carrier to operate on State highways two or more vehicles for the movement of superheavy or oversize equipment (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.071[c and d]). Routes for such permits shall be determined by municipalities with State highways in their territories or by the department of motor vehicles (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.072).

Permitted Tolerance: The department of motor vehicles may issue an annual permit that authorizes the operation of any commercial vehicle or combination of vehicles at maximum legal axle weights plus a 10 percent tolerance on axle weights as well as a 5 percent tolerance on GVW, provided that the vehicle is properly registered. Such permits do not allow vehicles to operate in excess of Federal limits on Interstate highways (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.011 and §623.0113).

Drilling Equipment: The department of motor vehicles may issue a permit for the movement on State highways of an overweight vehicle carrying oilfield drill pipes or drill collars stored in a pipe box (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.071[b]). Routes for such permits shall be listed on the permit and determined by municipalities with State highways in their territories or by the department of motor vehicles (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.072 and §623.080).

The department of motor vehicles may issue a permit for the movement of an overweight piece of fixed-load machinery or equipment used to service, clean, or drill an oil well (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.142). Routes for such permits shall be determined by municipalities with State highways in their territories or by the department of motor vehicles (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.143).

Implements of Husbandry: The department of motor vehicles may issue a permit for the movement on State highways of implements of husbandry, water well drill equipment, or harvesting equipment being moved for an agriculture operation (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.071[c][1 and 2]. Routes for such permits shall be determined by municipalities with State highways in their territories or by the department of motor vehicles (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.072).

Timber: None.132

Routes 133, 134

Port Authorities in Counties Bordering Mexico: The Texas Transportation Commission may authorize a port authority to issue permits for the movement of overweight vehicles operating on State highways located in counties bordering the Gulf of Mexico (or a bay or inlet opening into the gulf), provided that the county also borders Mexico or is adjacent to at least two counties with a population of at least 550,000 people. Such a permit may allow the operation of a vehicle with GVW up to 125,000 lbs. (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §§623.210 et seq.).

For a permit issued by a port authority located in a county contiguous to the Gulf of Mexico and that borders Mexico, the Texas Transportation Commission is authorized, with the consent of the port authority, to designate the most direct route from the following:

  • The Gateway International Bridge or the Veterans International Bridge at Los Tomates to the entrance of the Port of Brownsville using State Highways 48 and 4 or U.S. Highways 77 and 83 or using U.S. Highway 77 and U.S. Highway 83, East Loop Corridor, and State Highway 4.135

For a permit issued by a port authority located in a county contiguous to the Gulf of Mexico and that is adjacent to at least two counties with a population of 550,000 or more, the Texas Transportation Commission is authorized, with the consent of the port authority, to designate the most direct route from the following:

  • The intersection of Farm-to-Market Road 523 and Moller Road to the entrance of Port Freeport using Farm-to-Market Roads 523 and 1495,
  • The intersection of State Highway 288 and Chlorine Road to the entrance of Port Freeport using State Highway 288, and
  • The intersection of State Highway 288 and Chlorine Road to the entrance of Port Freeport using State Highways 288 and 332 and Farm-to-Market Roads 523 and 1495 (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.219).

Victoria County Navigation District Permits: The Texas Transportation Commission may authorize the Victoria County Navigation District to issue permits for the movement of oversized or overweight vehicles up to 140,000 lbs. GVW carrying cargo only on the following highways and roads located in Victoria County:

  • Farm-to-Market Road 1432 between the Port of Victoria and State Highway 185;
  • State Highway 185 between U.S. Highway 59 and McCoy Road;
  • U.S. Highway 59, including a frontage road of U.S. Highway 59, between State Highway 185 and Loop 463; and
  • Loop 463 between U.S. Highway 59 and North Lone Tree Road (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §§623.230 et seq.).

Chambers County Permits: The Texas Transportation Commission may authorize Chambers County to issue permits for the movement of oversized or overweight vehicles up to 100,000 lbs. GVW carrying cargo on State highways located in Chambers County only on the following routes:136

  • Farm-to-Market Road 1405 between its intersection with Farm-to-Market Road 2354 and its intersection with Farm-to-Market Road 565;
  • The frontage road of State Highway 99 located in the Cedar Crossing Business Park;
  • Farm-to-Market Road 565 from its intersection with Farm-to-Market Road 1405 east approximately 6,200 linear feet to the western edge of the 10 foot pipeline easement recorded in the Chambers County deed records; and
  • Farm-to-Market Road 2354 from its intersection with Farm-to-Market Road 1405 northwest approximately 300 linear feet to the termination of the State-maintained portion of the road (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §§623.250 et seq.).

Port of Corpus Christi Authority Permits: The Port of Corpus Christi Authority may issue permits for the movement of oversized or overweight vehicles carrying cargo on a roadway owned and maintained by the port authority that is located in San Patricio County or Nueces County (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §§623.280 et seq.).

Port of Corpus Christi Authority Special Freight Corridor137 Permits: The Texas Transportation Commission may authorize the Port of Corpus Christi Authority to issue permits for the movement of oversized or overweight vehicles carrying cargo on special freight corridors located in San Patricio County. The port authority may issue a permit under this subchapter only if the cargo being transported weighs 125,000 lbs. or less (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §§623.301 et seq.).

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Utah

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Utah are found in Utah Code Ann. §§72-7-401 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://www.le.utah.gov/UtahCode/section.jsp?code=72-7). Utah administrative regulations regarding size, weight, and load can be found in Utah Admin Code §R909-2) (available on the State's Web site at http://www.rules.utah.gov/publicat/code/r909/r909-002.htm#T5).

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Utah has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR Part 658, Appendix C) to allow vehicles to operate up to 129,000 lbs. GVW on parts of the interstate system. See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Utah, provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits: Utah State statute provides for commodity exemptions for logs and poles, livestock, and raw grain.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State axle limits and the State bridge formula, adopted from the FBF (Utah Code Ann. §72-7-404). See Exhibit 57 for a summary of Utah weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 57: Summary of Utah Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle n/a
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Other 10,500 lbs. per wheel

Other Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Logs/Poles: Vehicles transporting logs or poles from forest to sawmill are exempt from State axle weight limits on non-Interstate or defense highways if the GVW is less than 80,000 lbs. (Utah Code Ann. §72-7-401[2][e]).

Livestock/Raw Grain: Vehicles hauling livestock or raw grain (if the grain is being transported by the farmer from his farm to market before bagging, weighing, or processing) may exceed the State tandem axle weight limit by up to 2,000 lbs. without a permit on non-Interstate or defense highways (Utah Code Ann. §72-7-401[3]).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

The Federal weight allowance for idle emission reduction technology for auxiliary power units is granted by enforcement policy in Utah rather than by State law; that is, the exception is not specifically enumerated in the statute. The amount that is allowed under enforcement is 400 lbs.138

Other Exemptions

Fire Trucks: Fire-fighting apparatus vehicles are exempt from State weight limitations on all highways in Utah (Utah Code Ann. §72-7-401[2][a] through [2][c]).

Highway Construction Equipment: Highway construction and maintenance equipment is exempt from State weight limitations on all highways in Utah (Utah Code Ann. §72-7-401[2][a] through [2][c]).

Implements of husbandry: Implements of husbandry are exempt from State weight limitations on all highways in Utah (Utah Code Ann. §72-7-401[2][a] through [2][c]).

Tow Trucks:139 Tow trucks or towing vehicles under emergency conditions are exempt from State weight limits, provided that the tow truck is moving a disabled vehicle or combination of vehicles to the nearest safe area for parking or temporary storage, no other alternative is available, and the movement is for the safety of the traveling public (Utah Code Ann. §72-7-401[2][f]).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

Non-divisible Loads: The Department of Transportation may issue overweight permits authorizing the operation of a vehicle or combination of vehicles hauling a non-divisible load in excess of State weight limits up to 29,000 lbs. on a single axle, 50,000 lbs. on a tandem axle, 61,750 lbs. on a tridem axle, and a GVW of 125,000 lbs. These permits can be issued for semi-annual or annual durations. Vehicles hauling non-divisible loads above 125,000 lbs. GVW are only eligible for single-trip permits (Utah Code Ann. §72-7-406[1-7], Utah Administrative Code R909-2-25).

Divisible Loads: The Department of Transportation may issue overweight permits authorizing the applicant to operate a vehicle or combination of vehicles hauling a divisible load that exceeds State weight limits for three weight classifications, up to 84,000 lbs., up to 112,000 lbs., and up to 129,000 lbs. GVW, provided that the State bridge formula is not exceeded. These permits are available for various lengths of time up to 1 year (Utah Code Ann. §72-7-406[8]).

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: I-15 from Arizona to Idaho; I-70 from Jct. I-15 to Colorado; I-80 from Nevada to Wyoming; I-84 from Idaho to Jct. I-80; All of I-215 in Salt Lake.

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Utah State statute.

[ Return to list of States. ]


Vermont

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Vermont are found in Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 23, §§1391 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://legislature.vermont.gov/statutes/chapter/23/013).

Non-Grandfather Federal Exemption

Several provisions in Vermont Title 23 allow Vermont to treat the Interstate System as State roads if permitted under Federal approval. H.R. 2112, Division C, Section 125 signed by the President on November 18, 2011, extends to all portions of the Interstate Highway System in the States of Maine and Vermont the application of their respective State vehicle weight limit laws and regulations in lieu of Federal vehicle weight limits through December 31, 2031 (Vt. Stat. Ann. Tit. 23, §1391 [c] and Vt. Stat. Ann. Tit. 23, §1392 [13], [14], [16](B), [17](E)). For a description of extended Maine and Vermont Interstate Highway Heavy Truck Pilot Program, see http://ops.fhwa.dot.gov/freight/sw/reports/me_vt_pilot_2012/#s14.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Vermont, the following provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits.

  • Vermont allows 22,400 lbs. on a single axle and 36,000 lbs. on a tandem axle in regular operation on non-Interstate highways. Vermont allows an additional 10 percent weight tolerance above these weights.
  • Various types of vehicles are exempt from State weight limits in Vermont.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State axle limits and the State gross weight table (Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 23, §1391 and §1392). See Exhibit 58 for a summary of Vermont's weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 58: Summary of Vermont Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs. on Interstate Highway System
22,400 lbs. with a 10 percent tolerance non-Interstate highways
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs. on the Interstate Highway System
36,000 lbs. with a 10 percent tolerance on non-Interstate highways
Tridem Axle n/a
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Other 600 lbs. per inch of tire width

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Milk: When hauling unprocessed milk products, a truck tractor with five or more axles, semitrailer combination, or truck trailer combination, may be operated with a GVW of up to 90,000 lbs. on non-Interstate highways without a permit. These trucks can be operated on Interstate highways with a permit under a Federal grandfather provision (Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 23, §1392[16]).

Emission Reduction/Special Fuel Exemptions

The Federal weight allowance for idle emission reduction technology for auxiliary power units is granted by enforcement policy in Vermont rather than by State law; that is, the exception is not specifically enumerated in the statute. The amount that is allowed under enforcement is 400 lbs.140

Other Exemptions

Vehicle Type Exemptions: The following vehicles are exempt from State weight limits in Vermont: snow plows, road machines, oilers, traction engines, tractors, rollers, power shovels, dump wagons, trucks, or other construction or maintenance equipment when used by any town, incorporated village, city, or State in the construction or the maintenance of any highway (Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 23, §1399).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles141, 142

Blanket Permits: The Commissioner of the department of motor vehicles may issue a permit authorizing the operation of vehicles in excess of State weight limitations upon State highways and class 1 town highways.143 The permit is good for any amount of time as decided by the issuer. If the weight of the vehicle is considered "sufficiently excessive" for the requested route, the permit applicant will be subject to an additional fee for an engineering inspection of the vehicle (Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 23, §1402[a]).

Reciprocal Agreement: The Commissioner of the department of motor vehicles may enter into reciprocal agreements with other New England States to streamline the enforcement and issuance of overweight permits. Such an agreement is allowed to conflict with the permitting standards currently held in Vermont (Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 23, §1414[b]). In addition, a permit shall only be issued to vehicles registered in other States or Canadian provinces if such a State or province issues permits to vehicles registered in Vermont (Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 23, §1400[3]).

Agricultural Service Vehicles: Agricultural service vehicles are not required to obtain special permits for axle weights in excess of State limits if the GVW does not exceed 60,000 lbs. (Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 23, §1400d).

Five or More Axle Permits: Vermont allows special annual permits to be issued to vehicles with five or more axles exceeding State gross weight limits up to 90,000 lbs. (Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 23, §1392[13]).

Six or More Axle Permits: Vermont allows special annual permits to be issued to vehicles with six or more axles exceeding State gross weight limits up to 99,000 lbs. (Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 23, §1392[17]).

Routes

Vermont uses a class system of highways (excluding the Federal Interstate System), some of which are used in noting where overweight vehicles are able to travel by permit or other authorization. The highway classes are defined as follows:

  • Class 1 town highways are those town highways that form the extension of a State highway route and that carry a State highway route number. The agency is authorized to determine which highways are to be class 1 highways.144
  • Class 2 town highways are those town highways selected as the most important highways in each town. They are selected with the purposes of securing trunk lines of improved highways from town to town and to places which by their nature have more than normal amount of traffic. The selectmen,145 with the approval of the agency, are authorized to determine which highways are to be class 2 highways.
  • Class 3 town highways are all traveled town highways other than class 1 or 2 highways. The selectmen, after conference with a representative of the agency, are authorized to determine which highways are class 3 town highways.
  • Class 4 town highways are all town highways that are not class 1, 2, or 3 town highways or unidentified corridors. The select board is authorized to determine which highways are class 4 town highways.

(Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 19, §302)

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Virginia

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Virginia are found Va. Code §46.2-1101 through §46.2-1154 (available on the State's Web site at http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+TOC46020000010000000000000).

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Virginia, provisions in State law allow exceptions and exemptions for trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  • Virginia State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles and commodities.
  • Any vehicle may obtain an extension of single axle, tandem axle, and gross weight allowing these vehicles to exceed State weight limits up to 5 percent up to a maximum GVW of 84,000 lbs. on non-Interstate highways.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State axle limits and the State gross vehicle weight chart, which is adopted from the FBF (Va. Code §46.2-1124 through §46.2-1127). See Exhibit 59 for a summary of Virginia's weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 59: Summary of Virginia Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle n/a
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs.
Other 650 lbs. per inch width of tire

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

None.

Emission Reduction / Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for auxiliary power units or idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight, gross vehicle weight or bridge formula weight, is up to 400 lbs.146 or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (Va. Code §46.2-1129.1).

Natural Gas Vehicles: None.147

Other Exemptions

Tow Trucks: State weight limits do not apply to tow trucks when towing a disabled vehicle provided that the disabled vehicle is within State weight limits (Va. Code §46.2-1151).

Fire trucks: State weight limits do not apply to fire-fighting equipment of any political subdivision or fire company (Va. Code §46.2-1102).

Farm Equipment: State weight limits do not apply to farm machinery or agricultural multipurpose drying units when used in the ordinary course of business on non-Interstate highways (Va. Code §46.2-1102).

Farm vehicles: Vehicles registered as farm use vehicles may exceed State limits for single axle, tandem axle, and GVW limits by up to 5 percent, or a maximum GVW of 84,000 lbs. without a permit (Va. Code §46.2-1128).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Commissioner of the Department of Transportation is authorized to issue permits allowing the movement of overweight vehicles. No divisible load permit is authorized to travel on Interstate highways when a vehicle exceeds Federal weight limits (Va. Code §46.2-1139).

Weight Extensions: Permits may be purchased to exceed State limits for single axle, tandem axle, and GVW limits by up to 5 percent, or a maximum GVW of 84,000 lbs. These permits are valid for 1 year on non-Interstate highways (Va. Code §46.2-1128).

Virginia-Grown Farm or Forest Products: The Commissioner of the Department of Transportation may issue overweight permits authorizing the operation of vehicles used to haul Virginia-grown forest or farm products from the place where they are first produced, cut, harvested, or felled to the location where they are first processed. These permitted vehicles are allowed to exceed axle weight and GVW limits by 5 percent on non-Interstate highways.148 Such permits must be in addition to the 5 percent increase provided by a weight extension permit (Va. Code § 46.2-1129).

Emergency Vehicles: A special permit may be issued allowing an emergency vehicle to exceed weight posted weight limits on bridges or culverts provided an engineer approves the safety of such permit first (Va. Code §46.2-1130.1).

Concrete Haulers: The Commissioner of the Department of Transportation may issue overweight permits authorizing the operation of vehicles used to haul concrete.149 These permitted vehicles are allowed to exceed the tandem axle weight limit up to 40,000 lbs. and a tridem axle weight limit up to 50,000 lbs. The GVW of three-axle vehicles cannot exceed 60,000 lbs., and the GVW of four-axle vehicles cannot exceed 70,000 lbs. An additional permit can be obtained to exceed these weights by 5 percent. These permits are valid for 1 year (Va. Code § 46.2-1142; Va. Code § 46.2-1142.1).

Coal, Oil, & Aggregate: The Commissioner of the Department of Transportation may issue overweight permits authorizing the operation of vehicles used to haul coal or coal byproducts from a mine or other place of production to a preparation plant, electricity-generation facility, loading dock, or railroad. These permitted vehicles are allowed to exceed weight limits up to 24,000 lbs. on a single axle and 45,000 lbs. on a tandem axle. The GVW of three-axle vehicles cannot exceed 60,000 lbs., the GVW of four-axle vehicles cannot exceed 70,000 lbs., and five axle vehicles having no less than 35 feet of axle space between extreme axles may have a GVW up to 90,000 lbs. Six-axle vehicles are allowed a GVW of up to 110,000 lbs. These permits are only valid up to 85 miles within the State from the preparation plant, loading dock, or railroad (Va. Code §46.2-1143).

Excavated Material: The Commissioner of the Department of Transportation may issue overweight permits authorizing the operation of vehicles used to haul excavated material from construction-related land-clearing operations.150 These permitted vehicles are allowed a tandem axle weight limit up to 40,000 lbs. The GVW of three-axle vehicles cannot exceed 60,000 lbs., and the GVW of four-axle vehicles cannot exceed 70,000 lbs. These permits are only valid up to 25 miles from the land-clearing operation (Va. Code §46.2-1143.1).

Solid Waste: The Commissioner of the Department of Transportation may issue overweight permits authorizing the operation of vehicles used to haul solid waste other than hazardous waste. These permitted vehicles are allowed a tandem axle weight limit up to 40,000 lbs. and a tridem axle weight limit up to 50,000 lbs. The GVW of three-axle vehicles cannot exceed 60,000 lbs., and the GVW of and two-axle vehicles cannot exceed 40,000 lbs. No such permit shall authorize the operation of any vehicle enumerated in this section beyond the boundary of the county or city where it is principally garaged or for a distance of more than 25 miles from the place where it is principally garaged, whichever is greater. (Va. Code § 46.2-1144)

Tank Wagons: The Commissioner of the Department of Transportation may issue overweight permits authorizing the operation of tank wagon vehicles. These permitted vehicles are allowed to exceed the single axle weight limit up to 24,000 lbs. and the tandem axle weight limit up to 40,000 lbs. These permits are good for 1 year (Va. Code §46.2-1144.1).

Farm Animal Feed: None.151

Virginia-Grown Farm Produce: The Commissioner of the Department of Transportation may issue overweight permits authorizing the operation of vehicles used to haul farm produce grown in Virginia. These permitted vehicles are allowed to exceed the single axle weight limit up to 24,000 lbs., the tandem axle weight limit up to 40,000 lbs., and a tridem axle weight limit up to 50,000 lbs. The GVW of four-axle vehicles cannot exceed 70,000 lbs., and the GVW of five-axle vehicles cannot exceed 90,000 lbs. These permits are only valid in Accomack and Northampton Counties (Va. Code §46.2-1148).

Coal Haulers: Based on an engineering analysis, the Commissioner of the Department of Transportation may issue a permit for rubber-tired overweight self-propelled haulers used in the construction and coal mining industries to operate on State highways while empty for up to 75 miles (Va. Code §46.2-1149).

Cotton: The Commissioner of the Department of Transportation may issue overweight permits authorizing the operation of vehicles used to transport seed cotton modules. These permitted vehicles are allowed to exceed the tandem axle weight limit up to 44,000 lbs. up to 56,000 lbs. GVW. These permits are only authorized to operate in excess of State weight limits from September 1 through December 31 (Va. Code §46.2-1149.1).

Specialized Mobile Equipment: The Commissioner of the Department of Transportation may issue overweight permits authorizing the operation of specialized mobile equipment. These permitted vehicles are allowed to exceed the tandem axle weight limit up to 44,000 lbs. up to 64,000 lbs. GVW (Va. Code §46.2-1149.4).

Drilling Equipment: The Commissioner of the Department of Transportation may issue overweight permits authorizing the operation of underground pipe cleaning, hydroexcavating, and water blasting equipment. These permitted vehicles are allowed to exceed the tandem axle weight limit up to 44,000 lbs. up to 64,000 lbs. GVW (Va. Code §46.2-1149.5).

Arlington County: The Commissioner of the Department of Transportation is required to issue a permit when requested in writing that allows the county to operate vehicles used for hauling household waste and vehicles used for highway or utility construction, operation, or maintenance, upon the highways of the county to exceed State weight limits up to 24,000 lbs. on a single axle and 40,000 lbs. on a tandem axle (Va. Code §46.2-1145).

Articulated Buses: The Commissioner of the Department of Transportation may issue permits authorizing articulated passenger buses to operate with a single axle weight of no more than 25,000 lbs.152 (Va. Code §46.2-1147).

Specialized Construction Equipment: None.153

Containers: Sealed international containers are considered non-divisible loads and may be issued a special overweight permit by the Commissioner of the Department of Transportation, for transportation to or from a seaport, if the container has been or will be transported by marine shipment. Contents of the container cannot be changed from the time it is loaded by the consignor or his agents to the time it is delivered to the consignee or his agents (Va. Code §46.2-1141).

Truck Cranes: None.154

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Virginia State statute.

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Washington

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Washington are found in Wash. Rev. Code Ann. §§46.44.010 et seq. (available on the State's Web site at http://apps.leg.wa.gov/rcw/default.aspx?cite=46.44).

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Washington has a grandfather provision under Federal law ("Grandfathered Weight Provisions 1956") to allow vehicles to operate up to 105,500 lbs. GVW on non-Interstate highways.155

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Washington, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits. Washington State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles and commodities.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State axle limit and the State gross weight table, which mirrors the FBF weight table (Wash. Rev. Code Ann. §46.44.041). See Exhibit 60 for a summary of Washington weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 60: Summary of Washington Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle Per State weight table
Tridem Axle n/a
Gross Weight 105,500 lbs. on non-Interstate highways
Other 600 lbs. per inch of tire width

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

None.

Emission Reduction / Special Fuel Exemptions

State administrative code has adopted a weight exemption for auxiliary power units or idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight, gross vehicle weight or bridge formula weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (Washington Admin. Code §468-38-073(6)).

Other Exemptions

Gross Vehicle Weight Extension: The Department of Transportation and/or a local authority, with respect to highways under their respective jurisdictions, may extend the State weight table to 115,000 lbs. However, the extension must be in compliance with Federal law, and vehicles operating under the extension must be in full compliance with the 1997 axle and tire requirements under this section (Wash. Rev. Code Ann. §46.44.042).

Highway Improvement Vehicles: The State, county, or city authority having responsibility for the reconstruction or improvement of any public highway may, subject to prescribed conditions and limitations, authorize vehicles used in highway reconstruction or improvement to exceed the State's GVW limitations without a special permit or additional fees, but only while operating within the boundaries of project limits as defined in the public works contract or plans (Wash. Rev. Code Ann. §46.44.150).

Farm Implements: Farm implements are not subject to the single axle limits provided that their GVW does not exceed 45,000 lbs. (Wash. Rev. Code Ann. §46.44.130).

Fire trucks: Fire trucks can operate without a permit, while in their home fire district, if the axle weights and GVW weights comply with the following limits: 24,000 lbs. on a single axle, 43,000 lbs. on a tandem axle, and 67,000 lbs. GVW. In addition, permits can be issued by the Department of Transportation that allow up to 50,000 lbs. on a tandem axle of a fire truck (Wash. Rev. Code Ann. §46.44.190).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The Department of Transportation may issue special permits authorizing the movement of overweight vehicles on any public highway under their jurisdiction (Wash. Rev. Code Ann. §46.44.090). Such permits shall not allow weights exceeding the following:

  • A maximum of 22,000 lbs. on a single axle;
  • A maximum of 43,000 lbs. on two axles spaced less than 7 feet;
  • On a group of axels spaced between 7 and 10ten feet: 6,500 lbs. multiplied by the distance in feet between the extreme axles;
  • On a group of axles spaced between 10 and 30 feet: 2,200 lbs. multiplied by the sum of 20 and the distance in feet between the extreme axles; or
  • On a group of axles spaced more than 30 feet: 1,600 lbs. multiplied by the sum of 40 and the distance in feet between the extreme axles.

The above weight limits for special permits may be exceeded for permits issued to vehicles with tires of a certain diameter156 or for vehicles whose movement is determined to be necessary by the Department of Transportation (Wash. Rev. Code Ann. §46.44.091[1,3, and 4].

Logs: A specific vehicle combination157 hauling logs may exceed the State GVW limit by 6,800 lbs. provided the axles meet spacing requirements.158 These vehicles require special permits, available by the quarter for up to 1 year, issued by the Department of Transportation that are valid only on highways authorized by the department (Wash. Rev. Code Ann. §46.44.047).

Farm Implements: Special permits may be issued by the Department of Transportation for a quarterly or annual period that shall allow the movement of farm implements (either cutting or threshing mature crops or identified by rule of the DOT) exceeding State limits. Such permits are subject to the weight limits of special permits as described previously in this profile (Wash. Rev. Code Ann. §46.44.140).

Intermodal Containers: Sealed overweight international containers are considered non-divisible and are allowed on specific routes near ports called heavy haul industrial corridors. See the Routes section below.

Routes

Heavy Haul Industrial Corridors: The Department of Transportation, with respect to State highways maintained within port district property and with the permission of the port commission, may enter into agreements with port districts and adjacent jurisdictions for the purpose of identifying, managing, and maintaining short heavy haul industrial corridors within port district property for the movement of overweight sealed containers used in international trade.159 Overweight movements on these routes require a special permit issued by the Department of Transportation for the duration of up to 1 year limited to non-Interstate highways within the heavy haul corridor. The following is a list of route segments are currently identified as heavy-haul industrial corridors and their applicable weight limits:

  • A portion of SR-97 from the Canadian border to milepost 331.12 for the movement of overweight vehicles to and from the Oroville railhead. Special overweight permits for this route may be issued up to a GVW of 139,994 lbs. within the weight and axle spacing limits prescribed by British Columbia.

Except for the route provision above, department-issued special permits allowing overweight movements on heavy haul industrial corridors are limited to 22,000 lbs. for a single axle, 43,000 lbs. on a tandem axle, and 105,500 lbs. GVW.

In addition, any agreement entered into by the department with a port district adjacent to Puget Sound and located within a county that has a population of more than 700,000, but less than 1 million, must limit the applicability of any established heavy haul corridor to that portion of SR-509 beginning at milepost 0.25 in the vicinity of East D Street and ending at milepost 3.88 in the vicinity of Taylor Way. Any heavy haul corridor established between 2011 and 2013 must be within SR-509 at milepost 0.25 and milepost 5.7 in the vicinity of Norpoint Way Northeast160 (Wash. Rev. Code Ann. §46.44.0915).

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West Virginia

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of West Virginia are found in W. Va. Code §§17C-17-1 et seq. In addition, laws governing the Coal Resource Transportation Road System are found in W. Va. Code §§17C-17A-1 et seq.(available on the State's Web site at http://www.legis.state.wv.us/WVCODE/Code.cfm?chap=17c&art=17#17). Additional information about West Virginia's weight limits can be found on the WVDOT Web site http://www.transportation.wv.gov/highways/maintenance/hauling_permits/Pages/default.aspx

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in West Virginia, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. West Virginia State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles and commodities.
  2. West Virginia State statute allows for several tolerances for axle weights and/or GVW.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the provisions in W. Va. Code §17C-17-9. See Exhibit 61 for a summary of West Virginia weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 61: Summary of West Virginia Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operationst161
Single Axle 20,000 lbs. Interstate and STRAHNET
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs. Interstate and STRAHNET
Tridem Axle Per FBF Interstate and STRAHNET
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs. maximum on Interstate and STRAHNET and all other routes
Other 10 percent tolerance on non-Interstate highways routes not part of the Interstate or STRAHNET

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

None.

Emission Reduction / Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight and gross vehicle weight, is up to 550 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (W. Va. Code §17C-13A-4).162

Other Exemptions

Fire Trucks: State statutes governing size, weight, and load do not apply to fire trucks. (W. Va. Code §17C-17-1[b])

Road Machinery: State statutes governing size, weight, and load do not apply to road machinery. (W. Va. Code §17C-17-1[b])

Implements of Husbandry: State statutes governing size, weight, and load do not apply to implements of husbandry, including farm tractors, temporarily moved upon a highway. (W. Va. Code §17C-17-1[b])

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

The public service commission may issue a special permit authorizing the applicant to operate or move a vehicle or combination of vehicles of a size or weight or load exceeding the State maximum weight limits on a multitrip or continuous basis on any highway in the State (W. Va. Code §17C-17-11[a][1]).

Non-Divisible Loads: The Commissioner of highways and the public service commission163 may each issue a special permit to operate or move a vehicle or combination of vehicles of a size or weight of vehicles or non-divisible load164 exceeding the State weight limits (W. Va. Code §17C-17-11[a][2] and [b][1]).

Containerized Cargo: The Commissioner of highways may issue a special permit to allow the applicant to move or operate a vehicle hauling containerized cargo in a sealed, seagoing container to or from a seaport or inland waterway port that has or will be transported by marine shipment where the vehicle exceed State weight limits provided the container's contents are not changed from the time it is loaded to the time it is delivered. This permit can be issued for limited or continuous operation and only allows operation on roadways designated by the Commissioner of highways (W. Va. Code §17C-17-11[a][3]).

Coal: The public service commission may issue permits for the overweight operation on the Coal Resource Transportation Road System. Such permits are valid for and allow a GVW up to 120,000 lbs. (on a six-axle vehicle) plus a 5 percent tolerance. Vehicles operating with this permit are still required to obey axle limits set by the public service commission (W. Va. Code §17C-17A-4 and §17C-17A-5).

Routes

Interstate and STRAHNET Routes:

Legal load is defined by Federal law; all loads are legal if they meet the following criteria:

  1. Maximum of 80,000 lbs. gross vehicle weight;
  2. Maximum of 20,000 pound single axle weight;
  3. Maximum of 34,000 pound tandem axle weight; and
  4. FBF with the following exception: two sets of tandem axles may carry a gross load of 34,000 lbs. each if the overall distance between the first and last axle is 36 feet or more.

A tandem-axle is defined as two or more consecutive axles whose centers are spaced more than 40 inches apart but not more than 96 inches part.

All Interstate routes as well as US-50 from I-79 in Clarksburg to the Ohio/West Virginia State border with reasonable access fall under this jurisdiction (CFR 658.17).

All Other Routes:

A truck is considered legal as long as the gross weight does not exceed the gross weight for which such vehicle is registered, does not exceed the legal route load, and does not exceed any of the weight limitations listed below. (W.Va. Code §17C-17-9)

  1. The gross weight imposed on the highway by the wheels of any one axle of a vehicle must not exceed 20,000 lbs.
  2. A SU truck having one steering axle and two axles in tandem is limited to a maximum gross weight of 60,000 lbs. with a tolerance of 10 percent.
  3. A SU truck having one steering axle and three axles in tridem is limited to a maximum gross weight of 70,000 lbs. with a tolerance of 10 percent.
  4. A SU truck having one steering axle and four axles in quadrem is limited to a maximum gross weight of 73,000 lbs. with a tolerance of 10 percent.
  5. A tractor-semitrailer combination with five axles, a tractor-semitrailer combination with six or more axles, a SU truck having one steering axle and two axles in tandem in combination with a trailer with two axles and a SU truck having one steering axle and three axles in tridem in combination with a trailer with two axles is limited to a maximum gross weight of 80,000 lbs. with a tolerance of 10 percent.

West Virginia Turnpike:

"The turnpike commission shall have full authority to adopt rules and regulations for the movement of traffic upon any turnpike project under its jurisdiction and to amend the limits imposed by article six (speed restrictions) and article seventeen (size, weight, and load) of this chapter insofar as their application to toll roads under its jurisdiction are concerned by resolution entered upon the turnpike commission's minute book." (W. Va. Code §17C-20-1)

Coal Resource Transportation Road System: The division of highways shall designate certain State highways to be included in the Coal Resource Transportation Road System. Only non-Interstate highways in the following areas are eligible to be designated within the system:

  • Boone, Fayette, Lincoln, Logan, McDowell, Mercer, Mingo, Raleigh, Wayne and Wyoming counties;
  • Braxton CR-19/29 from Mine 5 haulroad to the intersection of CR-36/1, CR-36/1 to the intersection of CR-36 and CR-36 to the Webster County line (Webster CR-9), in Braxton County;
  • CR-1 from the intersection of CR-7 to the intersection of Riley Delaplaine Road, in Ohio County;
  • Routes west of Sam Black Church and southwest to the Summers County line, in Greenbrier County;
  • Routes 4 and 16, in Clay County;
  • Routes 1/11, 16, 19, 19/2, 19/40, 20, 39, 41, 55 and 82, in Nicholas County;
  • Routes 9, 9/1, 9/2, 20, 32 and 82, in Webster County; and
  • All State-maintained roads and public highways found in Washington, Malden, Louden and Cabin Creek districts, Kanawha County.

(W. Va. Code §17C-17A-3).

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Wisconsin

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Wisconsin are found in Wis. Stat §348 (available on the State's Web site at https://docs.legis.wisconsin.gov/statutes/prefaces/toc). State laws related to overweight permits are in Wis. Stat §348.25 through §348.27. For maximum legal weight summary see: http://www.dot.wisconsin.gov/business/carriers/forms/sp4075.pdf. For general single-trip permit info: http://www.dot.wisconsin.gov/business/carriers/osow-single-trip.htm. For general multiple trip permits: http://www.dot.wisconsin.gov/business/carriers/osow-single-trip.htm

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Wisconsin, but generally not on Interstate Highways, several provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits:

  1. Wisconsin State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of vehicles and commodities.
  2. Wisconsin State statute allows for several tolerances for axle weights and/or GVW.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State's weight statutes (Wis. Stats. §348.15). For standard maximum axle weight and spacing provisions, see Wis. Stats. Figure 348.15(3)(c). The maximum State weight limits apply to Class A highways while Class B highways are permitted only 60 percent of the maximum limits (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.16). See Exhibit 62 for a summary of Wisconsin's weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 62: Summary of Wisconsin Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle Not defined in statute, subject to State's bridge formula
Gross Weight State bridge formula
80,000 lbs. (5-axle or more)
Other Steering axle 20,000 lbs. Gross weight of any one wheel or multiple wheels supporting one end of an axle may not exceed 11,000 lbs.

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

Agricultural or Husbandry: None.165

Livestock: Trucks hauling livestock may exceed applicable axle or axle group limits by 15 percent. This increase does not apply to Interstate highways except for the following routes (upon their Federal designation as I 39):

  • USH 51 between Wausau and STH 78, and
  • STH 78 between USH 51 and the I 90/94 interchange near Portage.

(Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.15[e]).

Milk for Human Consumption: Milk and dairy production vehicles are limited to the following weights: one axle: 21,000 lbs.; two axles: 37,000 lbs. spaced 8-feet or less apart; three consecutive axles: 2,000 lbs. greater than the corresponding limit in the State bridge table. The GVW is limited to 80,000 lbs. This does not apply to Interstate highways except for the following routes (upon their Federal designation as I 39):

  • USH 51 between Wausau and STH 78, and
  • STH 78 between USH 51 and the I 90/94 interchange near Portage.

(Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.15[3][bg]).

Forest Products: Vehicles transporting peeled or unpeeled forest products are limited to the following weights: one axle: 21,500 lbs.; two axles: 37,000 lbs. spaced 8-feet or less apart; three consecutive axles: 4,000 lbs. greater than the corresponding limit in the State bridge table. The GVW is limited to 80,000 lbs. This does not apply to Interstate highways except for the following routes (upon their Federal designation as I 39):

  • USH 51 between Wausau and STH 78, and
  • STH 78 between USH 51 and the I 90/94 interchange near Portage.

(Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.15[3][br]).

In addition, while hauling peeled or unpeeled forest products for winter maintenance,166 vehicles may operate in excess of State gross weight limits. Such vehicles are allowed on Class A or Class B highways (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.175).

Scrap Metal: Vehicles transporting scrap metal are limited to the following weights: one axle: 21,500 lbs.; two axles: 37,000 lbs. spaced 8-feet or less apart; three consecutive axles: 4,000 lbs. greater than the corresponding limit in the State bridge table. Gross vehicle weight is limited to 80,000 lbs. This does not apply to Interstate highways except for the following routes (upon their Federal designation as I 39):

  • USH 51 between Wausau and STH 78, and
  • STH 78 between USH 51 and the I 90/94 interchange near Portage.

(Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.15[3][br]).

Septage: Trucks hauling septage are limited to the following weights: one axle: 21,500; two axles: 37,000 lbs., three axles: 4,000 lbs. above corresponding limit in the State's bridge table; four axles: 6,000 lbs. above the corresponding limit in the State's bridge table; five or more axles: 7,000 lbs. above the corresponding limit in the State's bridge table. Gross vehicle weight is limited to 80,000 lbs. This does not apply to Interstate highways except for the following routes (upon their Federal designation as I 39):

  • USH 51 between Wausau and STH 78, and
  • STH 78 between USH 51 and the I 90/94 interchange near Portage.

(Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.15[3][bv]).

Seasonal Agricultural Exemptions: From Sept. 1 to Dec. 31 of each year, no permit is required for the transportation of corn, soybeans, potatoes, vegetables, or cranberries from the field to storage or processing facilities on non-Interstate highways. Vehicles can exceed applicable limits by up to 15 percent (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.17[5][a]). The same applies to vehicles hauling manure to or from farms (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.17[6][a]).

Emission Reduction / Special Fuel Exemptions

Emission Reduction Equipment: State law has adopted a weight exemption for idle reduction technology units similar to the exemption in 23 U.S.C. §127(a)(12). The exemption, which applies to axle weight, gross vehicle weight or bridge formula weight, is up to 400 lbs. or the certifiable weight of the unit, whichever is less (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.15[3][f]).

Other Exemptions

Construction Equipment: State weight limits do not apply to road machinery actually engaged in the construction or maintenance of a highway (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.02[4]).

Tow Trucks: State weight limits do not apply to vehicles engaged in the emergency towing of a disabled vehicle (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.02[5]).

Snow Plows: State weight limits do not apply to vehicles owned by a political subdivision while engaged in the removal, treatment or sanding of snow or ice (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.18).

Energy Emergencies: During an energy emergency the divisible load limitation may be waived for up to 30 days, and vehicles carrying energy resources or milk commodities are allowed to exceed applicable axle weights by up to 10 percent and gross vehicle weights by up to 15 percent. This does not apply to vehicles on highways designated as parts of the national system of Interstate and defense highways, except for that portion of USH 51 between Wausau and STH 78 and that portion of STH 78 between USH 51 and the I 90/94 interchange near Portage upon their Federal designation as I 39 (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.17[3]).

Permits for Overweight Vehicles167

The Department of Transportation may issue special permits allowing the operation of vehicles in excess of State weight limits. Such permits may be issued for a single trip or on an annual basis and may typically only be issued to non-divisible loads. State law permits Wisconsin to enter into reciprocal agreements with other jurisdictions for the issuance and recognition of overweight permits (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.25 through §348.27).

Manufacturing Permits: Permits may be issued for the transportation of loads on STH 31 among manufacturing plants, distribution centers, and warehouses. Permits may be issued for loads that exceed State weight limits by up to 18,000 lbs. GVW and are valid only for the counties of Racine or Kenosha on non-Interstate highways (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.27[4m]).

Forest Products: The Department of Transportation may issue an overweight permit to vehicles transporting peeled or unpeeled forest products, lumber or forestry biomass while traveling on US Highway 2 in Iron County or Ashland County168 or on US Highway 2 in Bayfield County from the Ashland County line through Hart Lake Road (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.27[9][a][1][b]).

Bulk Potatoes: Permits may be issued for bulk potatoes from storage facilities to rail loading facilities in vehicle combinations that exceed the maximum gross weight by not more than 10,000 lbs. The permit authorizes the operation of any vehicle combination at a maximum gross weight up to 90,000 lbs. It is valid on STH 64 between CTH "H" and USH 41 in Langlade, Oconto and Marinette counties; USH 41 between STH 64 and the Wisconsin-Michigan border; and any highway for a distance not to exceed 15 miles from any portion of STH 64 or USH 41 specified in this subsection in order to obtain access to STH 64 or USH 41169 (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.27[9t]).

Grain, Coal, or Iron: Permits may be issued for the transportation of grain, coal, iron ore concentrates, or alloyed iron to exceed statutory weight limits over any class of roadway for up to 5 miles from the Wisconsin State line. This permit does not allow travel on Interstate highways (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.27[10]).

Granular Roofing Materials: Permits may be issued for the transportation of granular roofing materials to exceed GVW limits by up to 10,000 lbs. This permit does not allow travel on Interstate highways (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.27[15][a]).

Sealed Loads: Annual or single-trip permits may be issued for the transportation of sealed loads in international trade to exceed GVW limits by up to 10,000 lbs. (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.27[17][b] and §348.26[8]) Vehicles operating under such permit, with six or more axles, are subject to a special weight table located in statute, permitting up to 90,000 lbs. GVW (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.29).

Transportation of Raw Forest and Agricultural Products: Annual or consecutive month permits may be issued for raw forest products, fruits, vegetables, or bulk potatoes from field to storage or processing facilities or bulk potatoes for up to 90,000 lbs. except on the National System of Interstate and Defense Highways, except on I 39 between STH 29 south of Wausau and the

I-90/94 interchange near Portage in Marathon, Portage, Waushara, Marquette and Columbia counties. Bulk potatoes transported from storage facilities to rail loading facilities up to 90,000 lbs. on USH 51 between CTH "V" and CTH "B" in Waushara and Portage counties, and for a distance not to exceed 15 miles from that portion of USH 51 in order to obtain access to USH 51 or to reach fuel, food, maintenance, repair, rest, staging, terminal facilities or points of loading or unloading. Raw forest products transported by vehicle combination with six or more axles may be permitted up to 98,000 lbs. except on the Interstate system. (Wis. Stat §348.27(9m)(1-4))

Transportation of Scrap: Annual or consecutive month permits may be issued for the transportation of metallic or nonmetallic scrap for the purpose of recycling or processing on a vehicle or combination of vehicles which exceeds statutory weight or length limitations and for the return of the vehicle or combination of vehicles when empty. This does not apply to the transportation of scrap on highways designated as part of the National System of Interstate and Defense Highways, except for that portion of USH 51 between Wausau and STH 78 and that portion of STH 78 between USH 51 and the I 90/94 interchange near Portage upon their Federal designation as I 39. (Wis. Stat §348.27(9r))

Transportation of Garbage/Refuse: The Department of Transportation may issue annual or consecutive month permits for the transportation of garbage or refuse in a self-compactor equipped vehicle which exceeds statutory weight limitations. A permit under this subsection may be issued for use on any highway within this State170 (Wis. Stat §348.27(12))

Permit for Transportation of Loads near the Wisconsin-Michigan State line:171 Permits may be issued for vehicles operating under Michigan length and weight law provisions within 11 miles of the State line.Permits may be issued for vehicles operating under those provisions and that are transporting raw forest products, lumber, or forestry biomass on additional other routes in northern Wisconsin as specified in Statute. Maximum GVW is 164,000 lbs. (Wis. Stat §348.27 (9)).

Implements of Husbandry and Agricultural Commercial Vehicles:172 A no-fee permit may be issued by the maintaining authority to operate an implement of husbandry or agricultural commercial motor vehicle that exceeds limitations on length or weight, or both, imposed by this chapter. These permits are not valid on Interstate highways. (Wis. Stat §348.27 (19))

Routes

Weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Wisconsin State statute; however, Wisconsin statute classifies State highways as either Class A or Class B.173

Class A highways include all State trunk highways and connecting highways as well as portions of county trunk highways, town highways and city streets. Class A highways allow vehicles to travel at the maximum weight limits set forth by statute (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.15[1]).

Class B highways include the portions of county trunk highways, town highways and city streets which have not been designated as Class A highways. Class B highways allow vehicles to travel at 60 percent of the maximum weight limits set forth by statute (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.16).

[ Return to list of States. ]


Wyoming

The laws governing truck size and weight in the State of Wyoming are found in Wyo. Stat. §31-18-801 through §31-18-808 (available on the State's Web site at http://legisweb.state.wy.us/statutes/statutes.aspx?file=titles/Title31/T31CH18AR8.htm).

See the Wyoming Highway Patrol link for a summary of legal weights: http://www.whp.dot.state.wy.us/home/size_and_weight/size_limits.html

Grandfather Provision Allowing Higher Weights on Interstate Highways

Wyoming has a grandfather provision under Federal law (23 CFR 127(d)(1)(C)) to allow vehicles to operate up to 117,000 lbs. GVW on several routes, including parts of the Interstate System. See the Routes section for a full description of the routes to which this grandfather provision applies.

Summary of State Provisions that Exceed Federal Limits

With respect to trucks operating on the NHS in Wyoming, provisions in State law allow trucks to exceed some elements of Federal limits: Wyoming State statute allows for several axle and GVW exemptions for various types of commodities.

Regular Operations

The gross weight of vehicles in regular operations (operating without a special permit) is governed by the State's two gross weight tables. Most vehicles operating on non-Interstate highways may choose between the two weight tables provided in statute at the discretion of the operator (Wyo. Stat. §31-18-802). See Exhibit 63 for a summary of Wyoming weight provisions under regular operations.

Exhibit 63: Summary of Wyoming Truck Weight Limits for Vehicles in Regular Operations
Single Axle 20,000 lbs.
Tandem Axle 34,000 lbs.
Tridem Axle 42,000
Gross Weight 80,000 lbs. on primary and secondary highways using Gross Weight Table 2
117,000 lbs. on primary, secondary, and Interstate highways using Gross Weight Table 1
Other 600 lbs. per inch width of tire
750 lbs. per inch width of tire on steering axles

Exemptions and Special Operations

Commodity Exemptions

None.

Emission Reduction / Special Fuel Exemptions

The Federal weight exemption for idle emission reduction technology for auxiliary power units is granted by enforcement policy in Wyoming rather than by State law; that is, the exception is not specifically enumerated in the statute. The amount that is allowed under enforcement is 400 lbs.174

Other Exemptions

None.175

Permits for Overweight Vehicles

If the vehicle or load cannot be readily dismantled to meet the State weight limits, the Director of the Department of Transportation or his authorized representative may issue a permit. Each permit shall State the duration, authorized weight and route to be traveled (Wyo. Stat. §31-18-804[c] through [e]). The Director may promulgate rules and regulations regarding overweight permits (Wyo. Stat. §31-18-804[j]).

Tow Trucks: The Director of the Department of Transportation may issue annual permits authorizing the movements of damaged, disabled, or abandoned vehicles that exceed maximum State weight limits while being towed by a tow truck (Wyo. Stat. §31-18-808[e]).

Timber and Agricultural Products: The Director of the Department of Transportation may issue permits for movements not on Interstate highways, for hauling forest products, sugar beets, gravel, livestock and agricultural products hauled in trucks that cannot be weighed at point of loading at a weight which is not more than 10 percent in excess of allowable axle weights and not more than 5,000 lbs. in excess of the gross weights specified in the State bridge table. These permits are limited to non-Interstate highways for a period of up to 90 days (Wyo. Stat. §31-18-804[b]).

Vehicles Exceeding Gross Weight Table I: The Wyoming Department of Transportation may issue permits for movements not on Interstate highways, for hauling divisible loads where to vehicle combination is legal on all axle weights and complies with the bridge formula specifications of 23 U.S.C. 127. These permits are limited to non-Interstate highways for a period of up to 365 days. (Wyo. Stat. §31-18-804[t])

Long Combination Vehicles: The Director of the Department of Transportation may issue special permits, for up to 90 days, for vehicle combinations of more than three units. Such permits are for the purpose of testing the use of these vehicles under operating conditions (Wyo. Stat. §31-18-807).176

Routes

Grandfathered Routes: The grandfathered GVW provision is applicable to all primary, secondary, and Interstate highways in Wyoming using Gross Weight Table 1, found in Wyo. Stat. §31-18-802.

Generally, weight exemptions above Federal limits for certain routes are not specifically mentioned in Wyoming State statute. However, certain highways may be designated to carry vehicles of weights that exceed State limits if it has been determined by the Director that a situation of economic hardship exists or that the general welfare of the State of Wyoming would benefit from the operation. Vehicles operating on the designated highways shall obtain a permit in accordance with rules adopted by the Director177 (Wyo. Stat. §31-18-804[n]).

10 This is generally given to any vehicle with idle/emission reduction technology, exempting the weight of the unit from the total GVW of the vehicle up to a maximum allowance. [ Return to note 10. ]

11 This means that States are subject either to the standard Federal weight limits for Interstate highways (20,000 lbs. on a single axle, 34,000 lbs. on a tandem axle, and 80,000 lbs. gross vehicle weight) or to State-specific grandfathered limits or exceptions. [ Return to note 11. ]

12 Compliance clause is a term used in the report to refer to any clause in State statute to compel that State to comply with Federal law. [ Return to note 12. ]

13 It appears that these States have no other grandfathered provisions that would override the relevant standard Federal weight limits for Interstate highways. See previous note. [ Return to note 13. ]

14 Alaska has no Interstate highways; however, the routes on which grandfathered limits can operate are federally funded. [ Return to note 14. ]

15 Single axle and tandem axle weight limits are still 20,000 lbs. and 34,000 lbs., respectively. [ Return to note 15. ]

16 As of October 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended, and, as of August 16, 2013, the State Highway Commission became authorized to issue a special permit for five-axle vehicles hauling animal feed to livestock or poultry, up to a total gross weight limit of 85,000 lbs. (Ark. Stat. Ann. §27-35-210[o]). [ Return to note 16. ]

17 As of October 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended, and, as of Aug 16, 2013, the State Highway Commission became authorized to issue a special permit for five-axle vehicles hauling animal feed to livestock or poultry, up to a total gross weight limit of 85,000 lbs. (Ark. Stat. Ann. §27-35-210[o]). [ Return to note 17. ]

18 The California Department of Transportation Web site states that the alternative method is rarely used and that the computation contained in Cal. Vehicle Code §35551 is used at weigh stations. See FAQs at http://www.dot.ca.gov/hq/traffops/trucks/trucksize/weight.htm. [ Return to note 18. ]

19 California Assembly Bill 1772 (2009-2010) would allow 400 lbs. on State highways, but is currently inactive. [ Return to note 19. ]

20 Unless explicitly identified in Colo. Rev. Stat. §42-4-510. [ Return to note 20. ]

21 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on Oct. 1, 2013, to apply the exemption to any truck hauling agricultural commodities and to increase the gross vehicle weight limit to 100,000 lbs. [ Return to note 21. ]

22 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on July 1, 2013, to increase the exemption to 550 lbs. [ Return to note 22. ]

23 As of Oct. 1, 2012, exemptions for agricultural products, farm operations and livestock were the only commodity exemptions in Delaware. State law was subsequently amended on May 8, 2014, to add an exemption for poultry trucks (see Exemptions and Special Operations for more detail). [ Return to note 23. ]

24 As of Oct. 1, 2012, these were the only commodity exemptions in Delaware. State law was subsequently amended on May 8, 2014, to add an exemption for poultry trucks. Under current law, live-haul poultry trucks traveling less than 150 miles from the farm to the plant may have a total gross weight up to 90,000 lbs. with a 3 percent variance. The truck must adhere to all bridge weight limits and must not travel on the Interstate highway system. Beginning in 2015, these vehicles will also be subject to minimum axle spacing requirements (Del. Code Ann. tit. 21, §4501[f][1] and §4502[c][6]). [ Return to note 24. ]

25 Florida also uses the term, "Legal Weight Vehicles" to describe regular operations. [ Return to note 25. ]

26 This formula is called the "outer bridge formula" in State regulations. [ Return to note 26. ]

27 See administrative rule change effective Feb 5, 2013: http://www.fdotmaint.com/PermitNew/Sealed%20Containers.pdf [ Return to note 27. ]

28 State weight limits can also be exceeded without a permit for vehicles making a pickup or delivery of these commodities on any public road of a county road system (Ga. Code Ann. §32-6-26[g][1]). [ Return to note 28. ]

29 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on May 6, 2013, to increase these limits to 25,000 lbs. on a single axle, 50,000 lbs. on one tandem axle and 38,000 lbs. on any secondary tandem axle (Ga. Code Ann. §32-6-28[b][3]). [ Return to note 29. ]

30 The State bridge formula is W=900(L+40) (Hawaii Rev. Stat. §291-35[3]). [ Return to note 30. ]

31 As of Oct. 1, 2012, this was the only commodity-related exemption. State law was subsequently amended on July 1, 2013, to add a weight exemption for agricultural products on non-Interstate highways, up to 2,000 lbs. in excess of any State axle, bridge or gross vehicle weight limit (Idaho Code §49-1011[3]). [ Return to note 31. ]

32 This alternate chart may be applied when a greater weight limit would be permitted and the GVW does not exceed 79,000 lbs. Vehicles transporting logs, pulpwood, stull, rough lumber, poles, piling, ores, concentrates, sand, gravel, aggregates or agricultural commodities including livestock are permitted to implement the alternate weight table (Idaho Code §49-1001[2]). [ Return to note 32. ]

33 As of Oct. 1, 2012, this was the only commodity-related exemption. State law was subsequently amended on July 1, 2013, to add a weight exemption for agricultural products on non-Interstate highways, up to 2,000 lbs. in excess of any State axle, bridge, or gross vehicle weight limit (Idaho Code §49-1011[3]). [ Return to note 33. ]

34 Contact with the State confirmed that Idaho Transportation Department does not allow this on State maintained highways or the Interstate; it is allowed on local roads only (this is not explicitly stated in statute).[ Return to note 34. ]

35 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on July 1, 2013, to remove the term "pilot project" from statute and make this a permanent route network (Idaho Code §49-1004).[ Return to note 35. ]

36 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on July 1, 2013, to allow the authority with jurisdiction to designate routes within its jurisdiction for the operation of vehicle combinations weighing between 105,501 lbs. and 129,000 lbs. after analyzing the safety and feasibility of adding those routes. If an authority designates such routes, its governing board is responsible for issuing annual special permits authorizing travel on them. The new section of law retains the exclusive jurisdiction of a local authority to decline to designate, to revoke or modify an existing designation, or to place limits upon the designation of highways within its jurisdiction. [ Return to note 36. ]

37 Two additional "Special Haul Vehicle" exemptions were added in 2013 through new State legislation. These include three-axle concrete discharge trucks and three-axle sewer cleaning jetting vacuum trucks. See Appendix A for links to these new provisions. [ Return to note 37. ]

38 Examples of grandfathered vehicle configurations can be accessed at: http://www.in.gov/isp/files/size_weight_laws.pdf [ Return to note 38. ]

39 Such vehicles are specially designed and equipped with a self-compactor or detachable container; used exclusively for garbage, refuse, or recycling operations; and laden with garbage, refuse, or recyclables. [ Return to note 39. ]

40 This exception does not exempt these trucks, laden or unladen, from the State's wheel weight limit of 800 lbs. per inch of tire width. When unladen, they also must comply with the usual axle weight limits. [ Return to note 40. ]

41 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on July 1, 2013, to increase axle weight, gross vehicle weight and bridge formula weight limits by 2,000 lbs. for vehicles using alternative fuels (Ind. Code Ann. §9-20-4-1[b][6]). [ Return to note 41. ]

42 Referred to as recovery vehicles. [ Return to note 42. ]

43 Vehicles must also meet the requirements of Ind. Code Ann. tit. 9, Article 20, §4-9-9 and Ind. Code Ann. tit. 9, Article 20, §4-9-10. [ Return to note 43. ]

44 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on April 30, 2013, to allow the issuing of permits for overweight divisible loads (Ind. Code Ann. §9-20-6-2.5). [ Return to note 44. ]

45 Provision (22) and (23) are of particular importance because they have a special weight limit for that particular route. See Table 1 where the limits are added. [ Return to note 45. ]

46 Provision (22) is not the Indiana Toll Road, but it is the only place in statute that contains a 90,000 lb. limit. [ Return to note 46. ]

47 Provision (22) and (23) are of particular importance because they have a special weight limit for that particular route. See Table 1 where the limits are added. [ Return to note 47. ]

48 Per Google Maps, this intersection is within a rail yard and allows loads to cross the road to the other part of the rail yard. [ Return to note 48. ]

49 Only up to 95,000 lbs. GVW on certain parts of the system. See Routes section for detail. [ Return to note 49. ]

50 Primary and non-primary highways have the same single, tandem and gross weight limits, but the weight charts have differences based on axle spacing. The weight tables can be found in Iowa Code Ann. §321.463(5). [ Return to note 50. ]

51 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on April 5, 2013, to exempt vehicles with a retractable axle from weight limitations when the axle is retracted in order to turn (Iowa Code Ann. §321.463[13]). [ Return to note 51. ]

52 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on April 10, 2014, to include an exemption from State weight limits for equipment used primarily for the construction of conservation practices on agriculture land. [ Return to note 52. ]

53 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on April 5, 2013, to change "construction machinery" to "special mobile equipment other than cranes." [ Return to note 53. ]

54 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on April 5, 2013, to allow the maximum gross vehicle weight to be determined by the Department of Transportation for each permit (Iowa Code Ann. §321E.9). [ Return to note 54. ]

55 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on April 24, 2013, to authorize a "permit-issuing authority" to issue annual permits for compacted rubbish transporters, designate the travel routes and collect an annual fee for these permits for nongovernmental vehicles only (now located in Iowa Code Ann. §321E.30). [ Return to note 55. ]

56 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on April 24, 2013, to specify that vehicles with divisible loads of hay, straw or stover can be issued annual permits only, provided the total gross vehicle weight does not exceed 80,000 lbs. [ Return to note 56. ]

57 The systems are defined here: http://www.iowadot.gov/mvd/omve/truckguide.pdf (see page 23). [ Return to note 57. ]

58 Note: the Kansas Turnpike Authority receives no Federal funding. For more information on the Kansas Turnpike, please see: http://www.ksturnpike.com/travel_information/oversized_vehicles [ Return to note 58. ]

59 Source: http://transportation.ky.gov/Planning/Documents/Weight%20Class.pdf [ Return to note 58. ]

60 Source: Louisiana DOT contact. See 23 DFR Section 127(a)(9) for the Federal grandfather provision. [ Return to note 60. ]

61 Louisiana State statute uses "um" spelling for tandem and tridem axles. Statute will be respected for this summary; however, "tandum" and "tridum" are equivalent to "tandem" and "tridem," which are used by every other State and the District of Columbia. [ Return to note 61. ]

62 Vehicle must be configured as a Type Two, Type Six, Type Eight, Type Ten or Type Eighteen axle configuration, as defined in 23 U.S.C. §127. [ Return to note 62. ]

63 The Federal exemption is contained in 23 CFR 658.17(n). The source of this enforcement policy information is a U.S. Department of Energy newsletter dated September 2012, which can be found at http://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2014/03/f12/idling_newsletter_portfolio.pdf. [ Return to note 63. ]

64 As of Oct. 1, 2012. [ Return to note 64. ]

65 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on May 29, 2013, to allow the Secretary to issue special permits to vehicles transporting hay due to a disaster or emergency, including but not limited to severe and extended drought conditions (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §32:387[B][6]). [ Return to note 65. ]

66 See the Louisiana Regulations for Trucks, Vehicles and Loads 2013:. http://perba.dotd.louisiana.gov/welcome.nsf/RegBook2013.pdf [ Return to note 66. ]

67 See The Louisiana Regulations for Trucks, Vehicles and Loads 2013: http://perba.dotd.louisiana.gov/welcome.nsf/RegBook2013.pdf [ Return to note 67. ]

68 The 100,000 lb. GVW limit applies to six-axle combination vehicles (three-axle truck tractor with a tri-axle semitrailer). [ Return to note 68. ]

69 For additional information regarding this Federal exemption see: http://ops.fhwa.dot.gov/freight/sw/reports/me_vt_pilot_2012/ [ Return to note 69. ]

70 H.R. 2112, Division C, Section 125 signed by the President on Nov. 18th 2011- Extends to all portions of the Interstate Highway System in the States of Maine and Vermont the application of their respective State vehicle weight limit laws and regulations in lieu of Federal vehicle weight limits through December 31, 2031. [ Return to note 70. ]

71 As of Oct 1, 2012, the 64,000 lbs. limit for vehicles hauling potatoes was set to expire on Oct. 1, 2013. State law was amended on June 4, 2013, to remove that sunset provision and keep the limit in statute. [ Return to note 71. ]

72 Except that axles two and six may be temporarily lifted when necessary during cornering operations. [ Return to note 72. ]

73 As of Oct. 1, 2012. The authorization for this pilot program expired on Dec. 31, 2012 (Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 29-A, §2354-A). [ Return to note 73. ]

74 Note: It could be inferred from the section title and the context that these permits are for overweight loads, but the statutory language explicitly states this. [ Return to note 74. ]

75 Specific routes are given for the State's two Federal exemptions, but as they are given under Federal authority, no Federal limit is being exceeded. [ Return to note 75. ]

76 As of Oct. 1, 2012, these were the only other exemptions in statute. State law was subsequently amended on April 14, 2014, so that State weight limits also no longer apply to vehicles owned by or under contract with the State (or a political subdivision of the State) when engaged in emergency operations or in snow and ice removal consistent with Federal law (Md. Transportation Code Ann. §24-101[a]). [ Return to note 76. ]

77 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on April 14, 2014, to repeal the provision that had authorized the State Highway Administration to issue limited duration special vehicle permits in exceptional cases of vehicles exceeding size or weight limits. [ Return to note 77. ]

78 Other criteria related to highway safety, environmental impacts, road damage and maintenance must also be met before the secretary can exercise this authority (Md. Transportation Code Ann. §24-113.1[c]). [ Return to note 78. ]

79 The Federal exemption is contained in 23 CFR 658.17(n). The source of this enforcement policy information is a U.S. Department of Energy newsletter dated September 2012, which can be found at http://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2014/03/f12/idling_newsletter_portfolio.pdf [ Return to note 79. ]

80 164,000 lbs. is allowed only on an 11-axle vehicle. [ Return to note 80. ]

81 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on Dec. 28, 2012, to apply this exemption specifically to "agricultural commodities or raw timber, excluding farm equipment and fuel." [ Return to note 81. ]

82 For this section, a tandem is defined as two axles spaced more than 40 inches but not more than 96 inches apart or, as defined elsewhere in State law, two axles spaced more than 3 ft. 6 inches but less than 9 ft. apart (Mich. Comp. Laws Ann. §257.722[4]). [ Return to note 82. ]

83 The Federal exemption is found in 23 U.S. Code §127(a)(12). [ Return to note 83. ]

84 Per MDOT, the State now allows up to 98,000 on six-axle configurations in coordination with what WI allows. [ Return to note 84. ]

85 Per MDOT, although this permit is listed in the T-2 document, it was phased out officially last year. It was only for a few companies with specific trucks that are no longer in use. [ Return to note 85. ]

86 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on May 25, 2013, to increase this exemption to 550 lbs. (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.824[2][a][3]). [ Return to note 86. ]

87 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on May 25, 2013, to add a special permit for freight distribution (Minn. Stat. Ann. §169.868). [ Return to note 87. ]

88 The Federal exemption is contained in 23 CFR 658.17(n). The source of this enforcement policy information is a U.S. Department of Energy newsletter dated September 2012, which can be found at http://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2014/03/f12/idling_newsletter_portfolio.pdf. [ Return to note 88. ]

89 Pursuant to Miss. Code Ann. §27-19-81(4). [ Return to note 89. ]

90 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on July 1, 2013, to extend the sunset provision to July 1, 2016. [ Return to note 90. ]

91 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended to increase this exemption to 550 lbs., effective August 28, 2013 (Mo. Ann. Stat. §304.180[8]). [ Return to note 91. ]

92 Per MoDOT. [ Return to note 92. ]

93 A-train of 117,700 gross weight; B-train of 124,600 gross weight; Super B-train of 137,500 gross weight. [ Return to note 93. ]

94 The Federal exemption is contained in 23 CFR 658.17(n). The source of this enforcement policy information is a U.S. Department of Energy newsletter dated September 2012, which can be found at http://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2014/03/f12/idling_newsletter_portfolio.pdf. [ Return to note 94. ]

95 When the distance between the first and last axle of the group of axles is 6 feet or less. [ Return to note 95. ]

96 The Federal exemption is contained in 23 CFR 658.17(n). The source of this enforcement policy information is a U.S. Department of Energy newsletter dated September 2012, which can be found at http://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2014/03/f12/idling_newsletter_portfolio.pdf. [ Return to note 96. ]

97 Traction engines or tractors, the propulsive power of which is exerted not through wheels resting upon the ground but by means of a flexible band or chain known as a movable track, when the portions of the movable tracks in contact with the surface of the highway present plane surfaces, are exempt from weight limitations in Nevada (Nev. Rev. Stat §484D.670[1]). [ Return to note 97. ]

98 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on June 27, 2013, to increase this exemption to 550 lbs. (N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §266:18-c[VII]). [ Return to note 98. ]

99 The Federal exemption is contained in 23 CFR 658.17(n). The source of this enforcement policy information is a U.S. Department of Energy newsletter dated September 2012, which can be found at http://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2014/03/f12/idling_newsletter_portfolio.pdf. [ Return to note 99. ]

100 It is unclear from statute what a "transitional period" means in this context, or what exemptions this might have facilitated. It is known that this provision was enacted in or before 1983. New Jersey did not comment on this provision. [ Return to note 100. ]

101 See N.J.A.C. 13:18-1 for additional permit information. Available at: http://www.state.nj.us/transportation/about/rules/documents/13-18PermitsforOverdimensionalorOverweightVehicles_004.pdf [ Return to note 101. ]

102 See N.J.A.C. 16:32 for truck access route information. Available at: http://www.state.nj.us/transportation/about/rules/pdf/chapter32truckaccess.pdf [ Return to note 102. ]

103 The purpose of this language is to ensure vehicles obtain permits from New York City as well. [ Return to note 103. ]

104 From State contact—please see: https://www.dot.ny.gov/nypermits/repository/nycrr154-2.pdf [ Return to note 104. ]

105 From State contact—please see: https://www.dot.ny.gov/nypermits/repository/nycrr154-2.pdf [ Return to note 105. ]

106 The routes are verbatim from statute to ensure they are not misinterpreted. [ Return to note 106. ]

107 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on July 1, 2013, to add poultry and livestock feed to this list of commodities. [ Return to note 107. ]

108 Or a State-permitted production site located within a North Carolina county contiguous to the North Carolina State border. [ Return to note 108. ]

109 Statute defines tri-axle only for this subsection of code (§20-118[c][14]). Tri-axle is defined as three consecutive axles on which any two consecutive axles of the group, measured longitudinally center to center to the nearest foot, does not exceed 8 feet. [ Return to note 109. ]

110 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on Jan. 1, 2014, to add an exemption for municipality/public utility vehicles (N.C. Gen. Stat. §20-118[c][17]). [ Return to note 110. ]

111 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on Aug. 1, 2013, to exempt implements of husbandry and construction equipment used for agricultural, horticultural, or livestock operations from State axle weight limits (N.D. Cent. Code §39-12-05.3[8]). [ Return to note 111. ]

112 As of Oct. 1, 2012. The original legislation that enacted the authorization for multitrip permits (2011 N.D. Sess. Laws, Chap. 579 / 2011 North Dakota Senate Bill 2371) contained a sunset provision, under which that authorization expired on Dec. 31, 2013 (N.D. Cent. Code §39-12-02). [ Return to note 112. ]

113 North Dakota is a member of the WASHTO Permit Compact. [ Return to note 113. ]

114 LCVs with a truck tractor and two trailing units are allowed up to 127,400 lbs. GVW; LCVs with a truck tractor and three trailing units are allowed 115,000 lbs. GVW. [ Return to note 114. ]

115 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on July 1, 2013, to add a weight exemption for vehicles fueled solely by compressed natural gas (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §5577.044). [ Return to note 115. ]

116 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on July 1, 2013, to add provisions creating a regional heavy hauling permit (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §4513.34[A][1]). [ Return to note 116. ]

117 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on Sept. 29, 2013, to add designate aluminum coils as non-divisible loads (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §4513.34[C][3]). [ Return to note 117. ]

118 OH-7 only allows the truck tractor and three trailing units as a vehicle combination. [ Return to note 118. ]

119 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on September 29, 2013, to add the ability of the Director of Transportation to designate special economic development highways and to issue permits for travel on these routes (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §4513.34[A][3]). [ Return to note 119. ]

120 Oklahoma allows for load specific divisible load permits, but no general divisible load permit was ever created. The Oklahoma Corporation Commission handles all weight permitting. Information obtained per State contact. [ Return to note 120. ]

121 As of July 1, 2014: "fertilizer, cottonseed, cotton, livestock, peanuts, canola, sunflowers, soybeans, feed in bulk, any other raw agricultural products, and any other unprocessed agricultural products" were added, per State contact. [ Return to note 121. ]

122 A combination of vehicles that hauls cryogenic liquid from a manufacturing or processing facility to another manufacturing or processing facility may be permitted by the department and local authorities to move upon highways within their respective jurisdiction if the gross weight does not exceed 102,000 lbs. No permit may be issued for this type of movement upon an interstate highway. Cryogenic liquid language was added on December 24, 2013. [ Return to note 122. ]

123 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on December 24, 2012, to add a permit for overweight vehicles transporting eggs (Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 75, §4974). [ Return to note 123. ]

120 United States Department of Transportation, Comprehensive Truck Size and Weight Study, "Chapter 2. Truck Size and Weight Limits," FHWA-PL-00-029 (Volume II) (Washington, DC: USDOT, 2000). Available at: https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/reports/tswstudy/Vol2-Chapter2.pdf [ Return to note 124. ]

125 Vehicle must be designed for carrying passengers and must be composed of two sections permanently joined by a hinge mechanism or an articulated joint, which allows vertical and horizontal movement and a passage for riders moving from one section to the other. [ Return to note 125. ]

126 United States Department of Transportation. Comprehensive Truck Size and Weight Study, "Chapter 2. Truck Size and Weight Limits," FHWA-PL-00-029 (Volume II) (Washington, DC: USDOT, 2000). Available at: https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/reports/tswstudy/Vol2-Chapter2.pdf. [ Return to note 126. ]

127 The Federal exemption is contained in 23 CFR 658.17(n). The source of this enforcement policy information is a U.S. Department of Energy newsletter dated September 2012, which can be found at http://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2014/03/f12/idling_newsletter_portfolio.pdf. [ Return to note 127. ]

128 The transportation commission may designate any portion of the State highway system and increase the State weight limits as long as such increases conform to Federal limits (S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §32-22-33). [ Return to note 128. ]

129 As of Oct. 12, 2012. State law was subsequently amended to allow an exemption for idle reduction technology similar to the exemption in 23 U.S. Code §127(a)(12) up to 550 lbs. (Tenn. Code Ann. §55-7-203[8]). [ Return to note 129. ]

130 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on Sept. 1, 2013, to require a permit for the 10 percent tolerance (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §622.012 and §623.0171). [ Return to note 130. ]

131 The distance between the front wheel of the forward tandem axle and the rear wheel of the rear tandem axle, measured longitudinally, is 28 feet or more. [ Return to note 131. ]

132 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on Sept. 1, 2013, to add the requirement for an annual permit for overweight vehicles hauling timber on non-Interstate highways (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.321 through §623.325). Two bills in 2013 (2013 House Bill 2741 and 2013 House Bill 474) added different provisions to the same sections of State law; the timber permit described here was added by House Bill 2741. State statute has not yet been renumbered to fix this double citation. [ Return to note 132. ]

133 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on Sept. 1, 2013, to allow the Texas Transportation Commission to authorize a permit issued by a regional mobility authority for travel of vehicles with GVW up to 125,000 lbs. on certain routes in Hidalgo County (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.320 through §623.328). Two bills in 2013 (2013 House Bill 2741 and 2013 House Bill 474) added different provisions to the same sections of State law; the permits described here were added by House Bill 474. State statute has not yet been renumbered to fix this double citation. [ Return to note 133. ]

134 Many of these routes authorize optional permits by certain governing bodies but identify routes on which those permits can authorize overweight movements. [ Return to note 134. ]

135 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on Sept. 1, 2013, to add more route designations (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.219[a][2]). [ Return to note 135. ]

136 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on Sept. 1, 2013, to edit the routes under this permit (Tex. Transportation Code Ann. §623.252[b]). Return to note 136. ]

137 "Special freight corridor" means a highway built by this State specifically for the movement of oversized or overweight vehicles carrying cargo in San Patricio County to and from the port authority's La Quinta terminal. [ Return to note 137. ]

138 The Federal exemption is contained in 23 CFR 658.17(n). The source of this enforcement policy information is a U.S. Department of Energy newsletter dated September 2012, which can be found at http://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2014/03/f12/idling_newsletter_portfolio.pdf. [ Return to note 138. ]

139 Per State contact: Once moved to the nearest safe haven, the tow company has to purchase a permit or they have to break the load down into smaller configurations. [ Return to note 139. ]

140 The Federal exemption is contained in 23 CFR 658.17(n). The source of this enforcement policy information is a U.S. Department of Energy newsletter dated September 2012, which can be found at http://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2014/03/f12/idling_newsletter_portfolio.pdf. [ Return to note 140. ]

141 Note for all permits: Vt. Stat. Ann. Tit. 23, §1392a authorizes the Commissioner of the department of motor vehicles to delegate permitting functions and duties to any person at their discretion. [ Return to note 141. ]

142 In §1392[14] there are four more special permits listed. These are for specific three, four, and five axle vehicles. They do not allow the operation of vehicles in excess of 80,000 GVW; however, they do allow operation at levels that exceed the bridge formula or axle limits. [ Return to note 142. ]

143 The Commissioner may also issue permits to operate vehicles in excess of the size over any class 2, class 3, or class 4 town highways except when the dimensions are such that blanket permits cannot be issued (Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 23, §1400[c]). [ Return to note 143. ]

144 The Commissioner may also issue permits to operate vehicles in excess of the size over any class 2, class 3, or class 4 town highways except when the dimensions are such that blanket permits cannot be issued (Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 23, §1400[c]). [ Return to note 144. ]

145 Selectmen is the term for the elected officials that run a town/village. It could be the council men, trustees, aldermen etc. The statutory definition is in Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 19, §301. [ Return to note 145. ]

146 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on July 1, 2013, to increase the exemption to 550 lbs. (Va. Code §46.2-1129.1). [ Return to note 146. ]

147 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on July 1, 2014, to add a 2,000 lb. exemption for natural gas vehicles (Va. Code §46.2-1129.2). [ Return to note 147. ]

148 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on January 1, 2013, to limit this additional 5 percent increase of GVW to 84,000 lbs. (Va. Code §46.2-1129). [ Return to note 148. ]

149 Permits will be issued only to vehicles used exclusively for the mixing of concrete in transit or at a project site or for transporting necessary components in a compartmentalized vehicle to produce concrete immediately upon arrival at a project site and either have four axles with more than 22 feet between the first and last axle of the vehicle or three axles. [ Return to note 149. ]

150 Permits issued under this section only for vehicles that have either four axles with more than 22 feet between the first and last axle of the vehicle or three axles. The term "excavated material" as defined by statute means earth materials, which includes stumps, brush, leaves, soil, and rocks, removed by any mechanized means. [ Return to note 150. ]

151 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on Jan. 1, 2013, to add a permit for vehicles hauling farm animal feed (Va. Code §46.2-1144.2). [ Return to note 151. ]

152 Articulated buses are defined as having three or more axles consisting of two sections joined together by an articulated joint with the trailer being equipped with a mechanically steered rear axle, and having a gross weight of no more than 60,000 lbs. [ Return to note 152. ]

153 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on July 1, 2014, to add an overweight permit for specialized construction equipment (Va. Code §46.2-1149.7). [ Return to note 153. ]

154 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on July 1, 2014, to add a non-divisible load permit for truck cranes (Va. Code §46.2-1149.6). [ Return to note 154. ]

155 United States Department of Transportation, Comprehensive Truck Size and Weight Study, "Chapter 2. Truck Size and Weight Limits," FHWA-PL-00-029 (Volume II) (Washington, DC: USDOT, 2000). Available at: https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/reports/tswstudy/Vol2-Chapter2.pdf [ Return to note 155. ]

156 This applies to single pneumatic tires having a rim width of at least 20 inches and a rim diameter of at least 24 inches or dual pneumatic tires having a rim width of at least 16 inches and a rim diameter of at least 24 inches and specially designed vehicles manufactured and certified for special permits prior to July 1, 1975. [ Return to note 156. ]

157 Vehicle must be a three-axle truck tractor and a two-axle pole trailer combination licensed under State law to operate at a GVW of 68,000 lbs. [ Return to note 157. ]

158 The distance between the first and last axle of the vehicles in combination must have a total wheelbase of not less than 37 feet, and the weight upon two axles spaced less than 7 feet apart may not exceed 33,600 lbs. [ Return to note 158. ]

159 For purposes of this section, an overweight sealed container used in international trade, including its contents, is considered non-divisible when transported within a heavy haul industrial corridor defined by the department (Wash. Rev. Code Ann. §46.44.0915[4]). [ Return to note 159. ]

160 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on July 1, 2013, to change the exact start and end points of this route (Wash. Rev. Code Ann. §46.44.0915[5]). [ Return to note 160. ]

161 On routes other than the Interstate and STRAHNET, a truck is considered legal as long as the gross weight does not exceed the gross weight for which such vehicle is registered, does not exceed the legal route load, and does not exceed any of the GVW limits listed in the "Routes" section. State statute does not limit axle weights. [ Return to note 161. ]

162 Statute actually says: "The maximum gross weight limit and axle weight limit for any motor vehicle equipped with idle reduction technology may be increased by an amount necessary to compensate for the additional weight of the idle reduction technology as provided under 23 U.S.C. § 127(a)(12), as that section exists on the effective date of this article." [ Return to note 162. ]

163 §17c-17-11(a)(2) grants this power to the public service commission. §17c-17-11(b)(1) grants this power to the Commissioner of highways. Both are able to issue a non-divisible load permit. [ Return to note 163. ]

164 For purposes of this section, non-divisible load means any load exceeding applicable length or weight limits which, if separated into smaller loads or vehicles, would: (A) Compromise the intended use of the vehicle, to the extent that the separation would make it unable to perform the function for which it was intended; (B) destroy the value of the load or vehicle, to the extent that the separation would make it unusable for its intended purpose; or (C) require more than 8 work hours to dismantle using appropriate equipment. (W.Va. Code §17C-17-11[b][2]) [ Return to note 164. ]

165 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on April 23, 2014, to added weight exemptions and a separate gross weight table for implements of husbandry (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.15[3][b],[3][g] and [9] and §348.16). [ Return to note 165. ]

166 The winter maintenance exemptions also include vehicles carrying salt (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.175). [ Return to note 166. ]

167 State law was amended on Oct. 23, 2012, to limit any permit issued for movement near the Michigan/Wisconsin State line to 164,000 lbs. (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.27[9][d]). [ Return to note 167. ]

168 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended on Oct. 23, 2013, to add the portion of US Highway 2 in Florence County to this permit (Wis. Stat. Ann. §348.27[9][a][1][b]). [ Return to note 168. ]

169 Or to reach fuel, food, maintenance, repair, rest, staging, terminal facilities or points of loading or unloading. [ Return to note 169. ]

170 "Refuse" means combustible and noncombustible rubbish, including paper, wood, metal, glass, cloth and products thereof, litter and street rubbish, ashes, and lumber, concrete and other debris resulting from the construction or demolition of structures. [ Return to note 170. ]

171 Per State contact, this language was modified in 2013 and 2014. [ Return to note 171. ]

172 Per State contact, this was enacted in 2014. [ Return to note 172. ]

173 Several permits in Wisconsin State statute mention routes on which they are applicable; however, since Federal law allows States to issue overweight permits, these provisions do not exceed Federal limits. [ Return to note 173. ]

174 The Federal exemption is contained in 23 CFR 658.17(n). The source of this enforcement policy information is a U.S. Department of Energy newsletter dated September 2012, which can be found at http://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2014/03/f12/idling_newsletter_portfolio.pdf. [ Return to note 174. ]

175 Per State contact, in January 2014, Enrolled Act (SF0126), Wyoming Statute 31-18-804(n) was enhanced to allow for the emergency relief permit provided for in MAP-21. This allowed the Wyoming Highway Patrol staff to change the definition of non-divisible in WYDOT Motor Carrier Rules (Chapter 5) to include authorized vehicles going to or coming from an emergency, vehicles transporting casks of spent nuclear materials, and military vehicles transporting marked military equipment or materials. [ Return to note 175. ]

176 State statute does not specify if these permits allow overweight vehicles, among others. [ Return to note 176. ]

177 As of Oct. 1, 2012. State law was subsequently amended to slightly change this provision, including granting this power to the Governor in addition to the Director (Wyo. Stat. §31-18-804[n]). [ Return to note 177. ]

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