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SAFETEA-LU Section 1305: Truck Parking Facilities
Report to Congress

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USDOT Logo, Office of the Secretary, Washington, D.C., 20590

April 15, 2009

The Honorable James L. Oberstar
Chairman
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure
U.S. House of Representatives
Washington, DC 20515

Dear Mr. Chairman:

This letter report is submitted in accordance with Section 1305(c) of the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, and Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU). Section 1305 of SAFETEA-LU directs the Secretary of Transportation to establish a pilot program to address the shortage of long-term parking for commercial motor vehicles on the National Highway System (NHS). States, metropolitan planning organizations, and local governments are eligible for the funding available for fiscal Years (FY) 2006-2009. Section 1305 allows for a variety of eligible projects, ranging from construction of spaces and other capital improvements to using intelligent transportation systems technology to increase information on the availability of both public and private commercial vehicle parking spaces.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) solicited proposals for FY 2006 funding on August 28, 2006, after receiving Office of Management and Budget approval for a new information collection under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. Proposals submitted for the FY 2006 solicitation were still being reviewed when the FY 2007 solicitation was published on March 22. 2007. Because the FY 2007 solicitation was published so close to the due date for the FY 2006 proposals, the FY 2006 submissions were placed on hold and reviewed in conjunction with the FY 2007 submissions.

From that review, we found that many of the FY 2006 and FY 2007 proposals were meritorious, but they only addressed specific locations across NHS. Given the nature of long-haul truck movement, and given the amount of funds available. FHWA decided to focus on a corridor approach and on technological solutions that can provide for more widespread application and alleviation of the truck parking problem. The intent has been to find and fund solutions that could work along NHS corridors being scalable across the Nation.

Therefore, FHWA issued a new solicitation on November 16, 2007. ;In that solicitation, FHWA explained its thinking and clearly indicated that it was looking for corridor level solutions. The corridor level thinking, exemplified by Corridors of the Future, was used as an example of the type of corridors that were envisioned for funding. States were encouraged to assemble corridors or use existing ones when they submitted proposals. During the solicitation process Congress rescinded the FY 2008 funds for Section 1305, leaving the Department $11.2 million in funds in FY 2006 and FY 2007 for distribution. The new round of proposals more closely reflected a corridor level concept, and two projects were selected—the California iPark project along the I-5 corridor and the I-95 Corridor Coalition truck parking project along a seven-State region on the east coast.

The California iPark project will be funded at $5,455,372 over a 3-year period. ;This project will identify truck parking spaces at both public and private parking facilities through technology (cameras and sensors) and then communicate the availability of those spaces to the trucking community through communication devices such as cell phones, personal digital assistants, navigation programs, and other appropriate devices. ;Additionally, they will demonstrate a reservation system which will be designed to allow truckers to make an advance reservation for a parking space enabling them to more effectively utilize their hours of service.

The I-95 Corridor Coalition will be funded at $5,521,688 over a 3-year period. Seven States along the corridor are participating and are focusing on 8,351 parking spaces that will be monitored through advanced technology. The availability of those spaces will be communicated through traffic management centers to a selected lead center and then to the trucking community. The I-95 Corridor Coalition will consider technology similar to that used by the I-5 corridor, but will also look at park-and-ride facilities that are not used during the evening hours and will work with businesses to utilize their parking facilities during the evening hours. Additionally, the partner States plan to build an additional 250 spaces at a cost of $4 million—this amount is not included in the $5.5 million grant figure.

The FHWA will work closely with the I-95 States and with the State of California as they roll out their demonstration projects. Each of the projects will have 3 years to develop and evaluate the technological approaches they are proposing to help alleviate truck parking problems. The methodologies these projects will prototype for identifying and communicating available truck parking are scalable to the rest of the Nation. They also provide a unique opportunity to evaluate comparable solutions—one from the private sector, the I-5 corridor project, and one from the public sector, I-95 Corridor Coalition.

Both the I-95 Corridor Coalition Truck Parking Team on the East Coast and the I-5 Truck Parking Team in California have obligated funds and have developed a project plan. They are now in the process of project design and expect to begin project implementation in the latter part of 2009. When the FY 2009 funding becomes available, FHWA will either solicit for new projects or fund the next tier of projects from the November 2007 solicitation.

Identical letters have been sent to the Ranking Member of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and the Chairman and Ranking Member of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works.

Sincerely yours,

[Signature on file]

Ray LaHood


USDOT Logo, Office of the Secretary, Washington, D.C., 20590

April 15, 2009

The Honorable John L. Mica
Ranking Member
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure
U.S. House of Representatives
Washington, DC 20515

Dear Congressman Mica:

This letter report is submitted in accordance with Section 1305(c) of the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, and Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU). Section 1305 of SAFETEA-LU directs the Secretary of Transportation to establish a pilot program to address the shortage of long-term parking for commercial motor vehicles on the National Highway System (NHS). States, metropolitan planning organizations, and local governments are eligible for the funding available for fiscal Years (FY) 2006-2009. Section 1305 allows for a variety of eligible projects, ranging from construction of spaces and other capital improvements to using intelligent transportation systems technology to increase information on the availability of both public and private commercial vehicle parking spaces.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) solicited proposals for FY 2006 funding on August 28, 2006, after receiving Office of Management and Budget approval for a new information collection under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. Proposals submitted for the FY 2006 solicitation were still being reviewed when the FY 2007 solicitation was published on March 22. 2007. Because the FY 2007 solicitation was published so close to the due date for the FY 2006 proposals, the FY 2006 submissions were placed on hold and reviewed in conjunction with the FY 2007 submissions.

From that review, we found that many of the FY 2006 and FY 2007 proposals were meritorious, but they only addressed specific locations across NHS. Given the nature of long-haul truck movement, and given the amount of funds available. FHWA decided to focus on a corridor approach and on technological solutions that can provide for more widespread application and alleviation of the truck parking problem. The intent has been to find and fund solutions that could work along NHS corridors being scalable across the Nation.

Therefore, FHWA issued a new solicitation on November 16, 2007. ;In that solicitation, FHWA explained its thinking and clearly indicated that it was looking for corridor level solutions. The corridor level thinking, exemplified by Corridors of the Future, was used as an example of the type of corridors that were envisioned for funding. States were encouraged to assemble corridors or use existing ones when they submitted proposals. During the solicitation process Congress rescinded the FY 2008 funds for Section 1305, leaving the Department $11.2 million in funds in FY 2006 and FY 2007 for distribution. The new round of proposals more closely reflected a corridor level concept, and two projects were selected—the California iPark project along the I-5 corridor and the I-95 Corridor Coalition truck parking project along a seven-State region on the east coast.

The California iPark project will be funded at $5,455,372 over a 3-year period. ;This project will identify truck parking spaces at both public and private parking facilities through technology (cameras and sensors) and then communicate the availability of those spaces to the trucking community through communication devices such as cell phones, personal digital assistants, navigation programs, and other appropriate devices. ;Additionally, they will demonstrate a reservation system which will be designed to allow truckers to make an advance reservation for a parking space enabling them to more effectively utilize their hours of service.

The I-95 Corridor Coalition will be funded at $5,521,688 over a 3-year period. Seven States along the corridor are participating and are focusing on 8,351 parking spaces that will be monitored through advanced technology. The availability of those spaces will be communicated through traffic management centers to a selected lead center and then to the trucking community. The I-95 Corridor Coalition will consider technology similar to that used by the I-5 corridor, but will also look at park-and-ride facilities that are not used during the evening hours and will work with businesses to utilize their parking facilities during the evening hours. Additionally, the partner States plan to build an additional 250 spaces at a cost of $4 million—this amount is not included in the $5.5 million grant figure.

The FHWA will work closely with the I-95 States and with the State of California as they roll out their demonstration projects. Each of the projects will have 3 years to develop and evaluate the technological approaches they are proposing to help alleviate truck parking problems. The methodologies these projects will prototype for identifying and communicating available truck parking are scalable to the rest of the Nation. They also provide a unique opportunity to evaluate comparable solutions—one from the private sector, the I-5 corridor project, and one from the public sector, I-95 Corridor Coalition.

Both the I-95 Corridor Coalition Truck Parking Team on the East Coast and the I-5 Truck Parking Team in California have obligated funds and have developed a project plan. They are now in the process of project design and expect to begin project implementation in the latter part of 2009. When the FY 2009 funding becomes available, FHWA will either solicit for new projects or fund the next tier of projects from the November 2007 solicitation.

Identical letters have been sent to the Chairman of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and the Chairman and Ranking Member of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works.

Sincerely yours,

[Signature on file]

Ray LaHood

 


USDOT Logo, Office of the Secretary, Washington, D.C., 20590

April 15, 2009

The Honorable Barbara Boxer
Chairman
Committee on Environment and Public Works
United States Senate
Washington, DC 20510

Dear Madam Chairman:

This letter report is submitted in accordance with Section 1305(c) of the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, and Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU). Section 1305 of SAFETEA-LU directs the Secretary of Transportation to establish a pilot program to address the shortage of long-term parking for commercial motor vehicles on the National Highway System (NHS). States, metropolitan planning organizations, and local governments are eligible for the funding available for fiscal Years (FY) 2006-2009. Section 1305 allows for a variety of eligible projects, ranging from construction of spaces and other capital improvements to using intelligent transportation systems technology to increase information on the availability of both public and private commercial vehicle parking spaces.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) solicited proposals for FY 2006 funding on August 28, 2006, after receiving Office of Management and Budget approval for a new information collection under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. Proposals submitted for the FY 2006 solicitation were still being reviewed when the FY 2007 solicitation was published on March 22. 2007. Because the FY 2007 solicitation was published so close to the due date for the FY 2006 proposals, the FY 2006 submissions were placed on hold and reviewed in conjunction with the FY 2007 submissions.

From that review, we found that many of the FY 2006 and FY 2007 proposals were meritorious, but they only addressed specific locations across NHS. Given the nature of long-haul truck movement, and given the amount of funds available. FHWA decided to focus on a corridor approach and on technological solutions that can provide for more widespread application and alleviation of the truck parking problem. The intent has been to find and fund solutions that could work along NHS corridors being scalable across the Nation.

Therefore, FHWA issued a new solicitation on November 16, 2007. ;In that solicitation, FHWA explained its thinking and clearly indicated that it was looking for corridor level solutions. The corridor level thinking, exemplified by Corridors of the Future, was used as an example of the type of corridors that were envisioned for funding. States were encouraged to assemble corridors or use existing ones when they submitted proposals. During the solicitation process Congress rescinded the FY 2008 funds for Section 1305, leaving the Department $11.2 million in funds in FY 2006 and FY 2007 for distribution. The new round of proposals more closely reflected a corridor level concept, and two projects were selected—the California iPark project along the I-5 corridor and the I-95 Corridor Coalition truck parking project along a seven-State region on the east coast.

The California iPark project will be funded at $5,455,372 over a 3-year period. ;This project will identify truck parking spaces at both public and private parking facilities through technology (cameras and sensors) and then communicate the availability of those spaces to the trucking community through communication devices such as cell phones, personal digital assistants, navigation programs, and other appropriate devices. ;Additionally, they will demonstrate a reservation system which will be designed to allow truckers to make an advance reservation for a parking space enabling them to more effectively utilize their hours of service.

The I-95 Corridor Coalition will be funded at $5,521,688 over a 3-year period. Seven States along the corridor are participating and are focusing on 8,351 parking spaces that will be monitored through advanced technology. The availability of those spaces will be communicated through traffic management centers to a selected lead center and then to the trucking community. The I-95 Corridor Coalition will consider technology similar to that used by the I-5 corridor, but will also look at park-and-ride facilities that are not used during the evening hours and will work with businesses to utilize their parking facilities during the evening hours. Additionally, the partner States plan to build an additional 250 spaces at a cost of $4 million—this amount is not included in the $5.5 million grant figure.

The FHWA will work closely with the I-95 States and with the State of California as they roll out their demonstration projects. Each of the projects will have 3 years to develop and evaluate the technological approaches they are proposing to help alleviate truck parking problems. The methodologies these projects will prototype for identifying and communicating available truck parking are scalable to the rest of the Nation. They also provide a unique opportunity to evaluate comparable solutions—one from the private sector, the I-5 corridor project, and one from the public sector, I-95 Corridor Coalition.

Both the I-95 Corridor Coalition Truck Parking Team on the East Coast and the I-5 Truck Parking Team in California have obligated funds and have developed a project plan. They are now in the process of project design and expect to begin project implementation in the latter part of 2009. When the FY 2009 funding becomes available, FHWA will either solicit for new projects or fund the next tier of projects from the November 2007 solicitation.

Identical letters have been sent to the Ranking Member of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works and to the Chairman and Ranking Member of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.

Sincerely yours,

[Signature on file]

Ray LaHood


USDOT Logo, Office of the Secretary, Washington, D.C., 20590

April 15, 2009

The Honorable James M. lnhofe
Ranking Member
Committee on Environment and Public Works
United States Senate
Washington, DC 20510

Dear Senator lnhofe:

This letter report is submitted in accordance with Section 1305(c) of the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, and Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU). Section 1305 of SAFETEA-LU directs the Secretary of Transportation to establish a pilot program to address the shortage of long-term parking for commercial motor vehicles on the National Highway System (NHS). States, metropolitan planning organizations, and local governments are eligible for the funding available for fiscal Years (FY) 2006-2009. Section 1305 allows for a variety of eligible projects, ranging from construction of spaces and other capital improvements to using intelligent transportation systems technology to increase information on the availability of both public and private commercial vehicle parking spaces.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) solicited proposals for FY 2006 funding on August 28, 2006, after receiving Office of Management and Budget approval for a new information collection under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. Proposals submitted for the FY 2006 solicitation were still being reviewed when the FY 2007 solicitation was published on March 22. 2007. Because the FY 2007 solicitation was published so close to the due date for the FY 2006 proposals, the FY 2006 submissions were placed on hold and reviewed in conjunction with the FY 2007 submissions.

From that review, we found that many of the FY 2006 and FY 2007 proposals were meritorious, but they only addressed specific locations across NHS. Given the nature of long-haul truck movement, and given the amount of funds available. FHWA decided to focus on a corridor approach and on technological solutions that can provide for more widespread application and alleviation of the truck parking problem. The intent has been to find and fund solutions that could work along NHS corridors being scalable across the Nation.

Therefore, FHWA issued a new solicitation on November 16, 2007. ;In that solicitation, FHWA explained its thinking and clearly indicated that it was looking for corridor level solutions. The corridor level thinking, exemplified by Corridors of the Future, was used as an example of the type of corridors that were envisioned for funding. States were encouraged to assemble corridors or use existing ones when they submitted proposals. During the solicitation process Congress rescinded the FY 2008 funds for Section 1305, leaving the Department $11.2 million in funds in FY 2006 and FY 2007 for distribution. The new round of proposals more closely reflected a corridor level concept, and two projects were selected—the California iPark project along the I-5 corridor and the I-95 Corridor Coalition truck parking project along a seven-State region on the east coast.

The California iPark project will be funded at $5,455,372 over a 3-year period. ;This project will identify truck parking spaces at both public and private parking facilities through technology (cameras and sensors) and then communicate the availability of those spaces to the trucking community through communication devices such as cell phones, personal digital assistants, navigation programs, and other appropriate devices. ;Additionally, they will demonstrate a reservation system which will be designed to allow truckers to make an advance reservation for a parking space enabling them to more effectively utilize their hours of service.

The I-95 Corridor Coalition will be funded at $5,521,688 over a 3-year period. Seven States along the corridor are participating and are focusing on 8,351 parking spaces that will be monitored through advanced technology. The availability of those spaces will be communicated through traffic management centers to a selected lead center and then to the trucking community. The I-95 Corridor Coalition will consider technology similar to that used by the I-5 corridor, but will also look at park-and-ride facilities that are not used during the evening hours and will work with businesses to utilize their parking facilities during the evening hours. Additionally, the partner States plan to build an additional 250 spaces at a cost of $4 million—this amount is not included in the $5.5 million grant figure.

The FHWA will work closely with the I-95 States and with the State of California as they roll out their demonstration projects. Each of the projects will have 3 years to develop and evaluate the technological approaches they are proposing to help alleviate truck parking problems. The methodologies these projects will prototype for identifying and communicating available truck parking are scalable to the rest of the Nation. They also provide a unique opportunity to evaluate comparable solutions—one from the private sector, the I-5 corridor project, and one from the public sector, I-95 Corridor Coalition.

Both the I-95 Corridor Coalition Truck Parking Team on the East Coast and the I-5 Truck Parking Team in California have obligated funds and have developed a project plan. They are now in the process of project design and expect to begin project implementation in the latter part of 2009. When the FY 2009 funding becomes available, FHWA will either solicit for new projects or fund the next tier of projects from the November 2007 solicitation.

Identical letters have been sent to the Ranking Member of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and the Chairman and Ranking Member of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works.

Identical letters have been sent to the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works and to the Chairman and Ranking Member of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.

Sincerely yours,

[Signature on file]

Ray LaHood

Office of Operations