Office of Operations
photos of traffic merging onto congested highway, congestion in snowstorm, variable message sign, cargo, variable speed limit sign in a work zone, and a freeway at night
21st century operations using 21st century technologies

Operations - Did You Know? - Archive

The 2010 Urban Congestion Trends: Enhancing System Reliability with Operations report features a number of operations project evaluations demonstrating how system reliability can be enhanced through a variety of operational strategies. The report also includes three national snapshot performance measures derived from travel time data from 20 urban areas in the U.S. The measures include congested hours, travel time index, and the planning time index. - 1/12/2012

The 2011 Traffic Signal Operations Self Assessment is now available at www.ite.org/selfassessment. This self assessment not only provides agencies with a tool for benchmarking their own current practices, but will also provide necessary data for the 3rd Traffic Signal Report Card, which is a composite national score of agency practices and policies that support traffic signal management, operations, and maintenance. Traffic signal operating agencies are asked to complete a Traffic Signal Operations Self Assessment by December 16, 2011. - 10/28/2011

According to the Federal Highway Administration's Freight Analysis Framework version 3, on average, the U.S. transportation system handled the movement of 44 million tons of freight, worth $40 billion, each day in 2009. Forecasts indicate that these numbers will climb to approximately 74 million tons and $108 billion per day by the year 2040. (Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, Office of Freight Management and Operations, Freight Analysis Framework, version 3.1, 2010.) - 2/9/2011

According to data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System, work zone fatalities decreased from 2008 to 2009 by 7.4 percent. In 2008 there were 720 work zone fatalities while the number decreased to 667 fatalities in 2009. - 9/17/2010

Between 1985 and 2006, vehicle miles traveled increased by nearly 100 percent, while highway lane miles only increased 5 percent during the same period. (U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, Our Nation's Highways 2008, Publication Number: FHWA-PL-08-021 Washington D.C., 2008.) - 8/13/2010

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's Fatality Analysis Reporting System, crashes in work zones caused 720 fatalities in 2008. That figure represents a 39 percent decrease from 2002, when 1,186 work zone fatalities occurred. The number of work zone fatalities has decreased in the United States every year since 2002. - 4/21/2010

The Federal Highway Administration released the new 2009 Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD). On December 16, 2009 a final rule adopting the 2009 Edition of the MUTCD was published in the Federal Register. The MUTCD is the national standard for all traffic control devices, including traffic signs, pavement markings, signals and any other devices used to regulate, warn or guide traffic. Ensuring uniformity of traffic control devices across the nation - from their messages and placement to their sizes, shapes and colors - helps to reduce crashes and traffic congestion. This is the first comprehensive update to the manual since 2003. The MUTCD's new 2009 edition features many new and updated requirements, ranging from changes in highway signs and bike lanes to the color of high-visibility garments worn by road workers, and will become effective January 15th, 2010. - 12/23/2009

The FHWA Road Weather Management Program developed a self-evaluation and planning guide to help Transportation Management/Operations Centers integrate weather information in their daily operations. The Guide consists of a manual document and an electronic tool to assist TMC's in identifying their weather integration needs and selecting appropriate strategies to meet those needs. - 9/3/2009

Operations Current News is now available Via RSS Feed. The FHWA Office of Operations homepage now features an RSS feed feature for the "Current News." RSS enables users to subscribe and keep up with newly-posted information without having to browse or continually check back to a favorite web site. - 8/11/2009

The Interim Final Rule revising the Worker Visibility rule (23CFR 634) (published in the Federal Register November 21, 2008 and went into effect on November 24, 2008) was issued to create an exemption for the firefighting community. This interim Final rule allowed firefighters or other emergency responders working within the right-of-way of a Federal-aid highway and engaged in emergency operations that directly expose them to flame, fire, heat, and/or hazardous materials to wear. The FHWA decided to issue this interim final rule to address safety concerns raised by fire fighting community. Three comments were submitted to the Interim Final Rule. Those have been addressed and it was issued as a Final Rule on June 15, 2009. (Federal Register Notice, June 15, 2009 - Worker Visibility - Final Rule) - 6/26/2009

Congestion pricing - sometimes called value pricing - is a way of harnessing the power of the market to reduce the waste associated with traffic congestion. Congestion pricing works by shifting some less critical or more discretionary rush-hour highway travel to other transportation modes or to off-peak periods, taking advantage of the fact that the majority of rush-hour drivers on a typical urban highway are not commuters. By removing a fraction (even as small as 5%) of the vehicles from a congested roadway, pricing enables the system to flow much more efficiently, allowing more cars to move through the same physical space. Similar variable charges have been successfully utilized in other industries, for example, airline tickets, cell phone rates, and electricity rates. There is a consensus among economists that congestion pricing represents the single most viable and sustainable approach to reducing traffic congestion. (Source: Congestion Pricing - A Primer: Overview (FHWA-HOP-08-039)) - 5/11/2009

Work Zone is an area of a highway with construction, maintenance, or utility work activities. A work zone is typically marked by signs, channelizing devices, barriers, pavement markings, and/or work vehicles. It extends from the first warning sign or high-in-tensity rotating, flashing, oscillating, or strobe lights on a vehicle to the END ROAD WORK sign or the last temporary traffic control device. - 4/1/2009

The Projects of National and Regional Significance (PNRS) program was established under Section 1301 of SAFETEA-LU to provide grants to States for critical, high-cost transportation infrastructure facilities that address critical national economic and transportation needs. The Federal Highway Administration released its final rule on PNRS Evaluation and Rating that establishes the required evaluation and rating guidelines for proposed projects. The final rule was published in the Federal Register October 24, 2008. This rule is effective November 24, 2008. - 1/13/2009

On November 21, 2008, the FHWA issued an interim final rule revising the Worker Visibility rule (23CFR 634) to create an exemption for the firefighting community. This interim Final rule allows firefighters or other emergency responders working within the right-of-way of a Federal-aid highway and engaged in emergency operations that directly expose them to flame, fire, heat, and/or hazardous materials to wear retroreflective turn-out gear that is specified and regulated by other organizations, such as the National Fire Protection Association. Firefighters or other emergency responders working within the right-of-way of a Federal-aid highway and engaged in any other types of operations shall wear high-visibility safety apparel as defined in this rule. The FHWA decided to issue this interim final rule to address safety concerns raised by fire fighting community. The interim final rule was published in the Federal Register November 21, 2008 and went into effect on November 24, 2008. - 12/11/2008

The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) approved by the Federal Highway Administration is the national standard for all traffic control devices installed on any street, highway, or bicycle trail open to public travel in accordance with 23 U.S.C. 109(d) and 402(a). For the purpose of MUTCD applicability, open to public travel includes toll roads and roads within shopping centers, parking lot areas, airports, sports arenas, and other similar business and/or recreation facilities that are privately owned but where the public is allowed to travel without access restrictions. Military bases and other gated properties where access is restricted and private highway-rail grade crossings are not included in this definition. - 11/13/2008

Congestion means the level at which transportation system performance is unacceptable due to excessive travel times and delays. Congestion management means the application of strategies to improve system performance and reliability by reducing the adverse impacts of congestion on the movement of people and goods in a region. - 10/10/2008

The primary purpose of an HOV lane is to increase the total number of people moved through a congested corridor by offering two kinds of incentives: a savings in travel time and a reliable and predictable travel time. Because HOV lanes carry vehicles with a higher number of occupants, they may move significantly more people during congested periods, even when the number of vehicles that use the HOV lane is lower than on the adjoining general-purpose lanes. In general, carpoolers, vanpoolers, and transit users are the primary beneficiaries of HOV lanes. - 8/25/2008

Definition: "Transportation System Management and Operations" {23 U.S. Code 101(a)(39), HR1195} is (A) IN GENERAL - The term "transportation systems management and operations" means an integrated program to optimize the performance of existing infrastructure through the implementation of multimodal and intermodal, cross-jurisdictional systems, services, and projects designed to preserve capacity and improve security safety, and reliability of the transportation system. (B) INCLUSIONS - The term "transportation systems management and operations "includes - (i) regional operations collaboration and coordination activities between transportation and public safety agencies; and (ii) improvements to the transportation system, such as traffic detection and surveillance, arterial management, freeway management, demand management, work zone management, emergency management, electronic toll collection, automated enforcement, traffic incident management, roadway weather management, traveler information services, commercial vehicle operations, traffic control, freight management, and coordination of highway, rail, transit, bicycle, and pedestrian operations. - 7/28/2008

You can now access real-time traveler information by using a mobile device through the Internet by entering www.ops.fhwa.dot.gov/511/mobile for a list of mobile-device-friendly Web sites with real-time traveler information. The sites are suitable for any device capable of accessing the Web. - 5/21/2008

The Freight Facts and Figures 2007 report is a snapshot of the volume and value of freight flows in the United States, the physical network over which freight moves, the economic conditions that generate freight movements, the industry that carries freight, and the safety, energy, and environmental implications of freight transportation. This snapshot helps decision makers, planners, and the public understand the magnitude and importance of freight transportation in the economy. (Publication Number: FHWA-HOP-08-004) - 2/27/2008

When planned special events are held, they generally increase traffic demands in or near the location of the event. In order to address this influx of traffic, transportation management plans are developed with the intent of minimizing the effect the event has on the transportation system. For a transportation management plan to be successful, however, it is strongly recommended that the plan be tested and reviewed prior to the event. One of the most effective ways to test a transportation management plan is through a tabletop exercise. (Source: Tabletop Exercise Instructions For Planned Events and Unplanned Incidents/Emergencies, Publication Number: FHWA-HOP-08-005, http://www.ops.fhwa.dot.gov/publications/tabletopexercpe/index.htm) - 12/4/2007

The Localized Bottleneck Reduction (LBR) program is focused on recurring congestion chokepoints (as opposed to nonrecurring congestion problems) and the operational influences that cause them. Operational influences are the highway junction and decision points (e.g., lane drops, weaves, on- and off ramps, signals, intersections, merges, tollbooths, width-restricted underpasses, etc.) that can become overwhelmed by vehicle volume on a recurring basis. For more information, please visit the LBR program web site, http://www.ops.fhwa.dot.gov/bn/index.htm. - 11/7/2007

Advanced Traveler Information Systems, ATIS, can play an important role in communicating essential information to the public during disasters. Variable message signs, 511 telephone systems, highway advisory radio, and web sites are some of the dissemination devices of systems that collect, process, and disseminate information about travel conditions to the public for day-to-day transportation operations, and these same systems need to be effectively used during disaster situations. - 10/3/2007

In May 2006, the U.S. Department of Transportation announced the National Strategy to Reduce Congestion on America's Transportation Network. The Strategy acknowledges that "congestion is one of the single largest threats to our economic prosperity and way of life," and costs America an estimated $200 billion a year. The Strategy also notes that growing congestion reduces the economic benefits derived from the movement of freight. For trucking companies, congestion diminishes productivity and increases the cost of operations, as drivers must be paid for time spent making deliveries as well as time spent stalled or stopped in traffic. Additionally, congestion results in decreased fuel efficiency and increased vehicle maintenance costs resulting from stop-and-go traffic conditions. Congestion also contributes to societal costs such as decreases in air quality and increases in the cost of consumer goods. - 6/12/2007

Congestion pricing - sometimes called value pricing - is a way of harnessing the power of the market to reduce the waste associated with traffic congestion. Congestion pricing works by shifting purely discretionary rush hour highway travel to other transportation modes or to off-peak periods, taking advantage of the fact that the majority of rush hour drivers on a typical urban highway are not commuters. By removing a fraction (even as small as 5%) of the vehicles from a congested roadway, pricing enables the system to flow much more efficiently, allowing more cars to move through the same physical space. Similar variable charges have been successfully utilized in other industries - for example, airline tickets, cell phone rates, and electricity rates. There is a consensus among economists that congestion pricing represents the single most viable and sustainable approach to reducing traffic congestion. - 4/9/2007

In September 2004, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) published updates to the work zone regulations at 23 CFR 630 Subpart J. The updated Rule is referred to as the Work Zone Safety and Mobility Rule and applies to all State and local governments that receive Federal-aid highway funding. Transportation agencies are required to comply with the provisions of the Rule by October 12, 2007. The changes made to the regulations broaden the former Rule to better address the work zone issues of today and the future. For further information and guidance materials, please check out the Final Rule on Work Zone Safety and Mobility, http://www.ops.fhwa.dot.gov/wz/resources/final_rule.htm, under the Work Zone Mobility and Safety Program web site. - 1/24/2007

Ramp metering is the use of a traffic signal(s) deployed on a ramp to control the rate at which vehicles enter a freeway facility. By controlling the rate at which vehicles are allowed to enter a freeway, the flow of traffic onto the freeway facility becomes more consistent, smoothing the flow of traffic on the mainline and allowing more efficient use of existing freeway capacity. Ramp metering can be an effective tool to address congestion and safety concerns that occur at a specific point or along a stretch of freeway. Ramp metering can also improve overall system performance by increasing average freeway throughput and travel speed, and decreasing travel delay. Finally, ramp metering can lead to a reduction in fuel consumption and vehicle emissions. - 11/29/2006

Awareness of the effects of weather and emergency events on traffic operations, mobility and public safety has grown substantially in recent years. The Transportation Management Center (TMC) integration study is part of an ongoing FHWA research effort that seeks to document transportation operations across the country and identify strategies that can enhance the operational effectiveness of transportation management systems in general and TMCs in particular. The TMC Integration study documents how weather and emergency information and systems are being integrated into transportation operations now and the potential for applying practical, effective concepts and methods of integration in the future. It is a thesis of this study that integration of weather and emergency systems and information into transportation operations, coupled with effective deployment of ITS, will improve performance and offer benefits in increased public mobility, safety and security. (Source: Integration of Emergency and Weather Elements into Transportation Management Centers, Publication Number: FHWA-HOP-06-090) - 10/18/2006

The 2005 Urban Mobility Report reported road users in 85 U.S. urban areas incurred $63 billion in congestion costs in 2003, resulting in 2.3 billion gallons of wasted fuel and 3.7 billion hours of lost productivity. Congestion equates to decreased performance and, in turn, economic loss for businesses and trucking companies. Congestion either causes late deliveries or forces truckers to include additional travel time into their itineraries, particularly when making just-in-time deliveries. - 9/14/2006

In 2003, over 62,800 kilometers (39,000 miles) of highways in the United States had peak period congestion, and of these, over 10,900 kilometers (6,800 miles) were in rural areas. - 5/30/2006

The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, or MUTCD defines the standards used by road managers nationwide to install and maintain traffic control devices on all streets and highways. The signs, signals, and pavement markings that guide us are called traffic control devices. These devices are the language that communicates to drivers along the Nation's roadways. The MUTCD is published by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) under 23 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 655, Subpart F. - 4/26/2006

The Incident Command System (ICS) is a systematic tool used for the command, control, and coordination of an emergency response. ICS allows agencies to work together using common terminology and operating procedures for controlling personnel, facilities, equipment, and communications at a single incident scene. For more information, please check out the Simplified Guide to the Incident Command System for Transportation Professionals (Publication Number: FHWA-HOP-06-004), http://www.ops.fhwa.dot.gov/publications/ics_guide/index.htm. - 3/14/2006

What is Travel Time Reliability? - A formal definition for travel time reliability is: the consistency or dependability in travel times, as measured from day-to-day and/or across different times of the day. Travel time reliability is an increasing concern of travelers, shippers, and businesses. Recent advances in data collection mean that travel time reliability can now be quantified. The FHWA Office of Operations supports a national traffic monitoring program that incorporates reliability measures. This program tracks reliability measures like the buffer index and planning time index in more than 30 cities. For more information, please check out the Operations Performance Measurement Reliability Measures web page, http://www.ops.fhwa.dot.gov/perf_measurement/reliability.htm. - 2/7/2006

In September 2004, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) published updates to the work zone regulations at 23 CFR 630 Subpart J. The updated rule is referred to as the Work Zone Safety and Mobility Rule (Rule) and applies to all State and local governments that receive Federal-aid highway funding. Transportation agencies are required to comply with the provisions of the Rule by October 12, 2007. The changes made to the regulations broaden the former rule to better address the work zone issues of today and the future. For more information please visit the Work Zone Mobility and Safety Program web site, http://www.ops.fhwa.dot.gov/wz/index.asp - 1/6/2006

WHAT IS CONGESTION? Congestion is relatively easy to recognize - roads filled with cars, trucks, and buses, sidewalks filled with pedestrians. The definitions of the term congestion mention such words as "clog," "impede," and "excessive fullness." For anyone who has ever sat in congested traffic, those words should sound familiar. In the transportation realm, congestion usually relates to an excess of vehicles on a portion of roadway at a particular time resulting in speeds that are slower - sometimes much slower - than normal or "free flow" speeds. Congestion often means stopped or stop-and-go traffic. SOURCE: Traffic Congestion and Reliability: Trends and Advanced Strategies for Congestion Mitigation - 11/21/2005

As we experience increased travel on our roads, there is a growing need for efforts to preserve and improve safety and mobility. Roadway construction, operations, and maintenance are integral in these efforts. Effectively managing the work zone impacts of road construction and maintenance is a key part. In support of these efforts, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) published the Work Zone Safety and Mobility Rule (the Rule) on September 9, 2004 in the Federal Register (69 FR 54562). This Rule updates and renames the former regulation on "Traffic Safety in Highway and Street Work Zones" in 23 CFR 630 Subpart J. All State and local governments that receive Federal-aid highway funding are affected by this updated Rule, and are required to comply with its provisions no later than October 12, 2007. While the Rule applies specifically to Federal-aid highway projects, agencies are encouraged to apply the good practices that it fosters to other road projects as well. Source: Implementing the Rule on Work Zone Safety and Mobility (Publication Number: FHWA-HOP-05-065) - 10/18/2005

The term "managed lanes" has different meanings to different agencies. In some agencies the term is commonly thought of as high-occupancy toll (HOT) lanes. In other agencies a broader definition is customary, one in which a variety of management tools and techniques are combined in order to improve freeway efficiency and meet certain corridor and community objectives. This broader definition of "managed lanes" includes High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes, value priced lanes (including HOT lanes), and exclusive or special use lanes (such as express, bus-only, or truck-only lanes). Source: MANAGED LANES: A Cross-Cutting Study (Publication Number: FHWA-HOP-05-037) - 9/20/2005

American businesses and households depend on the reliable movement of goods. U.S. freight carriers moved over 15 billion tons worth more than $9 trillion in 1998. Trucks carried about 70 percent of the tonnage and nearly 80 percent of the value. In 2020, the volume of freight moved on the U.S. transportation system is expected to increase to 25 billion tons, worth about $30 trillion. Source: Freight Info - Measuring Travel Time in Freight-Significant Corridors, http://www.ops.fhwa.dot.gov/freight/time.htm. (Publication Number: FHWA-HOP-05-036) - 8/29/2005

Work zones on freeways are estimated to account for nearly 24 percent of non-recurring delay. A combination of recent studies indicate that approximately 50 percent of all highway congestion is attributed to non-recurring conditions, such as traffic incidents, weather, work zones, and special events. (U.S. Department of Energy, Temporary Losses of Highway Capacity and Impacts on Performance, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL/TM-2002/3). May 2002.) - 7/26/2005

The individual cost of congestion exceeded $900 per driver in 1997, resulting in over $72 billion in lost wages & wasted fuel. - 7/5/2005

Congestion continues to grow in America’s urban areas. Despite a slow growth in jobs and travel in 2003, congestion caused 3.7 billion hours of travel delay and 2.3 billion gallons of wasted fuel, an increase of 79 million hours and 69 million gallons from 2002 to a total cost of more than $63 billion. - 5/26/2005

In 2004, almost 15 million calls were made to "511" - a call every 2 seconds. On December 23, 2004, Kentucky's "511" service received almost 125,000 calls - 3 calls every 2 seconds. - 5/26/2005

Freight is carried via an extensive network of roads, railroad, waterways, and pipelines. Road infrastructure has increased slowly over the past two decades despite a large increase in the volume of traffic. Between 1980 and 2002, route miles of public roads increased by 3 percent compared with a 101 percent increase in vehicle miles traveled. Miles of railroad dropped by more than 20 percent over this same period, while rail shipments (measured in ton-miles) increased by 64 percent. - 4/7/2005

Traffic congestion caused by incidents affects the safety and mobility of all travelers. Major incidents can affect thousands of vehicles in an entire highway corridor or across a major portion of an urban area. Traffic incidents cause secondary incidents that also require response from the same agencies already engaged in the primary incident. Secondary incidents are not just crashes but also include engine stalls, overheating, and running out of fuel. Approximately 20 percent of all incidents are secondary incidents. - 3/4/2005

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is committed to a long-term, comprehensive, four-part approach to mitigating highway congestion. (1) Proper maintenance of the current road and bridge system. (2) New construction of roads, bridges, and nonhighway infrastructure should be considered where appropriate, particularly to relieve bottlenecks and to reduce conflicts between modes. (3) Transportation policies must encourage an appropriate balance between different modes, with highways and is seen as an integral element of the transportation system as a whole. (4) Transportation systems management and operations strategies must be used to maximize the capacity of the infrastructure already in place. - 1/31/2005

21st century technologies, referred to as intelligent transportation system (ITS) technologies, have been researched, deployed, and tested to some degree for more than 10 years. These technologies provide information about the transportation system and support development of tools that traffic professionals and travelers never had before. The technologies can be generally grouped into six types: information gathering, information sharing, control, vehicle-based, vehicle to roadside to home base, and payment. The Operations Story provides further information on what the Office of Operations is doing to support 21st century operations using 21st century technologies - http://www.ops.fhwa.dot.gov/aboutus/one_pagers/opstory.htm. - 1/7/2005

It has been estimated that approximately half of the congestion experienced by Americans happens virtually in the same location and at the same time every day, it is "recurring." Traffic demand exceeds the available capacity of the system and there are simply more vehicles than available space on the road. However, the other half of the delay results from unexpected events such as crashes, fog, snow, and work zones. The three main causes of non-recurring congestion are: traffic incidents ranging from flat tires to overturned trucks with hazardous materials (25 percent of congestion), work zones (10 percent of congestion), and adverse weather (15 percent of congestion). - 12/6/2004

Safety belt use in the United States has reached 80% according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), http://www.nhtsa.gov, 2004 survey. - 11/24/2004

Between 1982 and 2002, vehicle miles traveled increased by 79 percent, while highway lane miles only increased 3.0 percent during the same period. (Highway Statistics, Federal Highway Administration) - 11/10/2004

On a typical day in 2002, about 43 million tons of goods valued at about $29 billion moved nearly 12 billion ton-miles on the nation's interconnected transportation network. This represents an increase from about 37 million tons, valued at $20 billion, and traveling about 10 billion ton-miles in 1993. For more information, visit the Bureau of Transportation Statistics Freight Transportation web page at http://www.bts.gov/directory/freight_transportation/. - 10/6/2004

NOAA is predicting 12-15 tropical storms this season, with 6-8 becoming hurricanes, and 2-4 of these becoming major hurricanes (category 3 or higher). This predicted activity reflects a likely continuation of increased hurricane activity that began in 1995. For information on how this can impact the roads and how road weather management strategies can mitigate these impacts visit http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/weather - 8/30/2004

Results from the 2001 National Household Travel Survey, sponsored by BTS and the Federal Highway Administration, show that the daily non-occupational travel of all people in the United States totaled about 4 trillion miles, an average of 14,500 miles per person per year. On a daily basis, the average person traveled 40 miles, 88 percent of it in a personal vehicle. - 6/14/2004

In 2000, over 68,400 kilometers (42,500 miles) of highways in the United States were congested, and of these, over 9,600 kilometers (6,000 miles) were in rural areas. - 4/30/2004

In 2002, there were 1,181 work zone fatalities; this figure represents 2.8% of all roadway fatalities for the year. - 3/12/2004

Almost three out of four business trips are less than 250 miles and only one out of 14 business trips is more than 1,000 miles according to the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) (findings from the NHTS can be found at the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, www.bts.gov). - 1/6/2004

During the Christmas/New Year's travel period, long-distance travel grows as much as 23 percent compared to the rest of the year, according to a new National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) report from the U.S. Department of Transportation's Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS). - 12/23/2003

More than 6 million crashes occur each year on U.S. highways, and about 30 percent of those crashes are at intersections. - 12/16/2003

The 2001 National Household Travel Survey show that daily travel in the United States totaled about 4 trillion miles, an average of 14,500 miles per person annually. On a daily basis, Americans averaged 4 trips per day, totaling on average 40 miles of travel - most of it (35 miles) in a personal vehicle. - 12/1/2003

The National Household Travel Survey found that the Thanksgiving holiday period (Tuesday through Sunday) is among the most heavily traveled for long-distance trips - during this six-day holiday travel period, the number of long distance trips to and from a destination 50 miles or more rises by 54 percent, compared to the average for the remainder of the year. - 11/17/2003

The average daily one-way commute to work in the United States takes just over 26 minutes, according to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics' Omnibus Household Survey. - 11/3/2003

In 2001, almost 220,000 red light running crashes occurred in intersections. These crashes resulted in as many as 180,000 injuries and almost 900 fatalities and exacted a toll in excess of $12 billion on the U.S. economy. - 10/15/2003

From 1975 through 2001, it is estimated that safety belts saved 147,246 lives, including 12,144 lives saved in 2001. If ALL passenger vehicle occupants over age 4 wore safety belts, 21,311 lives (that is, an additional 9,167) could have been saved in 2001. - 9/26/2003

Congestion results in 5.7 billion person hours of delay annually in the United States. - 7/23/2003